Pierre Braunberger


Producer

About

Birth Place
Paris, FR
Born
July 29, 1905
Died
November 16, 1990

Biography

Began his film career as an actor but had moved behind the camera by the age of 20, producing Rene Clair's avant-garde short "Entr'acte" in 1924. Braunberger's first feature as a producer was "La fille de l'eau" (1925), the first of several collaborations with Jean Renoir. Braunberger is remarkable not simply for the length and productivity of his career, but for the imagination and dari...

Biography

Began his film career as an actor but had moved behind the camera by the age of 20, producing Rene Clair's avant-garde short "Entr'acte" in 1924. Braunberger's first feature as a producer was "La fille de l'eau" (1925), the first of several collaborations with Jean Renoir. Braunberger is remarkable not simply for the length and productivity of his career, but for the imagination and daring he showed in backing projects such as Luis Bunuel's banned surrealist classic "L' Age d'Or" (1930) and early New Wave films by Chris Marker, Alain Resnais and Jean-Luc Godard. He was awarded an honorary Cesar (the French Oscar) in 1980.

Life Events

1920

Began travels "to learn about the cinema"; worked in production and post-production in Germany and England

1922

Film acting debut

1923

Worked in US for a little over a year in various assistant positions, e.g. On the Hollywood film "Monsieur Beaucaire"

1924

First film as producer, Rene Clair's avant-garde short "Entr'acte"

1925

First feature as producer and first collaboration with Jean Renoir, "La fille de l'eau"

1926

Organized production (uncredited) for Renoir's third film, "Nana"

1929

Founded "Societe du Cinema du Pantheon"

1945

Formed "Pantheon" production company

1951

Sole directorial effort (also writer, producer), "La course de taureaux"

1989

Produced last film, "Knights of the Round Table"

Videos

Movie Clip

Shoot The Piano Player (1960) - I Ran Into This Streetlight Obscurity and misdirection from the start of Francois Truffaut's second feature, as we discover Chico (Albert Remy), running from thugs then chatting up a stranger (Alex Joffe) is not the hero, but only the brother of "Charlie" (Charles Aznavour), in Shoot The Piano Player, 1960.
Shoot The Piano Player (1960) - Is Art Tatum Talented? Still on the first evening, having just been told by the bar owner that she fancies him, waitress Lena (Marie DuBois) asks pianist "Charlie" (Charles Aznavour) for a loan, American jazz artists in his internal monologue, in Francois Truffaut's Shoot The Piano Player, 1960.
Shoot The Piano Player (1960) - Show Him The Package Waking up in his flat with Clarisse (Michele Mercier), musician "Charlie" (Charles Aznavour) sends little brother Fido (Richard Kanayan) to school, then realizes the thugs chasing his older brother are waiting outside, in Francois Truffaut's Shoot The Piano Player, 1960.
Shoot The Piano Player (1960) - Like Digging A Well We're still just learning the relationship between hero "Charlie" (Charles Aznavour) at the keyboard and Chico (Albert Remy) who fled into the bar after losing his pursuers, Michele Mercier the attentive Clarisse, in Francois Truffaut's Shoot The Piano Player, 1960, from a David Goodis novel.
La Chienne (a.k.a. The Bitch) (1931) - You Spoil Me, Darling Some time into their affair, far-from-wealthy bureaucrat LeGrand (Michel Simon) ends an evening with his mistress Lulu (Janie Parèse), sending her up to the apartment he pays for, furnished with his own paintings, still unaware that she’s giving his money to her boyfriend and de facto pimp Dèdè (Georges Flamant), in Jean Renoir’s La Chienne, a.k.a. The Bitch, 1931.
La Chienne (a.k.a. The Bitch) (1931) - Men Are Such Bores Jean Renoir directing his second sound feature, at a Paris art-scene salon, prostitute Lulu (Janie Parèse), who’s posing as fictional Clara, a suddenly popular painter, in a dancing-fight with her pimp-partner Dèdè (Georges Flamant) works with cohorts Alexandre Rignault, Pierre Desty and Lucien Mancini to schmooze a new customer (Jean Gehret), in La Chienne, a.k.a. The Bitch, 1931.
La Chienne (a.k.a. The Bitch) (1931) - You Call That Passion? Following his first meeting with Paris streetwalker Lulu, cashier LeGrand (Michel Simon), known around his office as a boring fellow with a domineering wife, returns home to her (Madeleine Berubet), angered over his timing and his painting hobby, in director Jean Renoir’s celebrated second sound feature, La Chienne, a.k.a. The Bitch, 1931.
La Chienne (a.k.a. The Bitch) (1931) - Get Your Claws In This Guy From director Jean Renoir, shooting on location in Paris, the first scene (following an earlier introduction) for Lulu (Janie Marèse) and Dèdè (Georges Flamant), meeting LeGrand (Michel Simon), the notoriously dull guy who chose not to attend the after-party following a company banquet, early in La Chienne, a.k.a. The Bitch, 1931.
La Chienne (a.k.a. The Bitch) (1931) - Open, A Stirring Social Drama The opening credits to Jean Renoir’s sensational second sound feature (he first made a quick farcical comedy, to show producers his ability with the new medium), then a framing device, using puppets to introduce his stars, Michel Simon, Janie Marese and Georges Flamant, in La Chienne, a.k.a. The Bitch, 1931.
Day In The Country, A (1936) - Feed Them To The Parisians! Opening from the 1946 release of a picture shot by Jean Renoir in 1936, the Dufour family arrives in the countryside from Paris, observed by denizens including Henri and Rodolphe (Georges Saint-Saens, Jacques Borel) and the director himself as innkeeper Poulain, in A Day In The Country (a.k.a. Un Partie De Campagne).
Day In The Country, A (1936) - I Call It My Private Office Nearing a climax in Jean Renoir’s somewhat unfinished idyllic rural short feature, local Henri (Georges Saint-Saens) romancing Parisian Henriette (Sylvia Bataille), and friend Rodolphe (Jacques Borel) her mother (Jeanne Marken), in A Day In The Country (a.k.a. Un Partie De Campagne),1936.
Day In The Country, A (1936) - I'm Sure They'd Love To Meet Us Parisian picnickers Henriette (Sylvia Bataille) and her mother (Jeanne Marken) being sussed by locals Henri (Georges Saint-Saens) and Rodolphe (Jacques Borel), the director Jean Renoir serving lunch, in A Day In The Country (a.k.a. Un Partie De Campagne), 1936, from a Guy de Maupassant story.

Family

Francoise Reichenbach
Nephew
Filmmaker.

Bibliography