Alfred Abel


Actor
Alfred Abel

About

Also Known As
Alfred Peter Abel
Birth Place
Germany
Born
March 12, 1879
Died
December 12, 1937

Biography

Alfred Abel made his mark in the world of entertainment when he worked on the Rudolf Klein-Rogge mystery "Dr. Mabuse, the Gambler" (1922). In 1913, he made his film acting debut in "Sodoms Ende." In 1928, he appeared in "Art of Love." In 1938, he played his final film role in "Mrs. Sylvelin."...

Biography

Alfred Abel made his mark in the world of entertainment when he worked on the Rudolf Klein-Rogge mystery "Dr. Mabuse, the Gambler" (1922). In 1913, he made his film acting debut in "Sodoms Ende." In 1928, he appeared in "Art of Love." In 1938, he played his final film role in "Mrs. Sylvelin."

Life Events

1913

Made his film acting debut in "Sodoms Ende"

Videos

Movie Clip

Great Man Votes, The (1939) - The Color Of Thy Giblets! We’re still figuring out the background of “Pop” Vance (John Barrymore), a drunken, widowed and brainy night watchman, whose son and daughter have gotten into some scrapes at school, when their teacher (Katharine Alexander as Miss Billow) visits, revealing new angles, in RKO’s The Great Man Votes, 1939, directed by Garson Kanin.
Hail The Conquering Hero (1944) - Home To The Arms Of Mother Seamless opening scene from writer-director Preston Sturges, introducing Woodrow (Eddie Bracken) crying in his beer, and Marines led by Heffelfinger (William Demarest), in Hail The Conquering Hero, 1944.
Diner (1982) - Cleopatra On A Plate Eddie (Steve Guttenberg) is discussing his upcoming marriage with home-from-college Billy (Tim Daly) when they're approached by nutty Methan (Tait Ruppert, working from Ernest Lehman's script for The Sweet Smell Of Success) at the pool hall in Barry Levinson's Diner, 1982.
Barretts Of Wimpole Street, The (1934) -- Your Brave And Lovely Verses London, 1845, Anabel and Henrietta (Katharine Alexander, Maureen O’Sullivan) persuade their invalid poet sister Elizabeth Barrett (Norma Shearer) to receive admiring fellow poet Robert Browning (Fredric March), calling for the first time, in MGM’s The Barretts Of Wimpole Street, 1934.
Metropolis (1926) - Club Of The Sons The opening of the still very broad narrative, director Fritz Lang exploiting outrageous sets and various instances of the famous "Schufftan Process" matte effect developed for the film, and the first look at Freder (Gustav Frolich), in Metropolis, 1926.
Deathdream (a.k.a. Dead Of Night, 1972) - I Have Some Sad News After a murky Vietnam combat prologue, we join John Marley, Lynn Carlin and Anya Ormsby as father, mother and sister of serviceman Andy, until Army officer Arthur Bradley intrudes, in Deathdream, (a.k.a. Dead Of Night),1972, from writer Alan Ormsby and director Bob Clark.
Deathdream (a.k.a. Dead Of Night, 1972) - Pretty Rough Over There Awakened by noises downstairs, Charlie, Christine and daughter Cathy (John Marley, Lynn Carlin, Anya Ormsby) discover brother Andy (Richard Backus), back from Vietnam the very night they got a telegram confirming his death, in Deathdream, (a.k.a. Dead Of Night), 1972.
Deathdream (a.k.a. Dead Of Night, 1972) - Kill Any Guys? (Warning to dog lovers!) Vietnam vet Andy (Richard Backus) hasn’t called his girlfriend, may have murdered a trucker, and now removes any hope that he’s okay, when his father (John Marley) brings the neighbor kids around, in Bob Clark’s Deathdream, (a.k.a. Dead Of Night), 1972.
Deathdream (a.k.a. Dead Of Night, 1972) -- (Original Trailer) Produced for the alternate title, the original trailer for the first horror collaboration by director Bob Clark and writer Alan Ormsby, with Richard Backus, John Marley and Lynn Carlin, Deathdream, (a.k.a. Dead Of Night), 1972.
Hatchet For The Honeymoon - It's Only A Hothouse It's not entirely clear why policeman Russell (Jesus Puente) is visiting serial killer and bridal fashion-house chief John (Stephen Forsyth) at his estate, but they speculate, then meet the newly-hired model Helen (Dagmar Lassander), early in Mario Bava's Hatchet For The Honeymoon, 1970.
Hatchet For The Honeymoon - Do Not Disturb After an abstract opening with nearly elevator music, director and cinematographer Mario Bava is far from orthodox introducing his killer and leading man (Stephen Forsyth), in this English-dubbed version of his Spanish-Italian "Giallo," Hatchet For The Honeymoon, 1970.
Hatchet For The Honeymoon - I Know I Must Kill Cutting from the opening murder on a real train, the hero, fashion-house proprietor John (Stephen Forsyth) with his toys, then very composed narration and the introduction of his troublesome wife (Laura Betti), in Italian director Mario Bava's Hatchet For The Honeymoon, 1970.

Bibliography