Cesare Zavattini


Screenwriter

About

Birth Place
Italy
Born
September 29, 1902
Died
October 13, 1989
Cause of Death
Stroke

Biography

Central architect of Italian neorealist cinema who laid down the blueprint for the movement with writings ranging from screenplays and novels to theory and poetry.After an uneventful screenwriting debut with "Daro un Milione" (1935), Zavattini, a committed Marxist, began to formulate his vision of a cinema of truth, free of artificiality and pretense, which would concern itself with the ...

Bibliography

"Straparole/Extra Words"
Cesare Zavattini (1967)
"Toto the Good"
Cesare Zavattini

Biography

Central architect of Italian neorealist cinema who laid down the blueprint for the movement with writings ranging from screenplays and novels to theory and poetry.

After an uneventful screenwriting debut with "Daro un Milione" (1935), Zavattini, a committed Marxist, began to formulate his vision of a cinema of truth, free of artificiality and pretense, which would concern itself with the problems of everyday people. He collaborated with another key figure of the movement, Vittorio De Sica, as early as "Teresea Venerdi" (1941), but it was with "The Children are Watching Us" (1943), about a young boy who experiences the separation of his parents, that the foundations for the movement were laid. Zavattini and De Sica went on collaborate on such classic films as "Shoeshine" (1946), "Bicycle Thieves" (1948), "Miracle in Milan" (1950) "Umberto D" (1952), "The Roof" (1956) and "Two Women" (1960).

Zavattini also wrote several books (some of which were turned into films) as well as screenplays for other directors, among them Alessandro Blasetti ("Four Steps in the Clouds" 1942), Rene Clement ("The Walls of Malpaga" 1949) and Luchino Visconti ("Bellissima" 1951). At the age of 80 he directed his first film, the surrealistic "The Truth" (1982).

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

La Veritaaa' (1982)
Director
Love in the City (1953)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

Strand: Under the Dark Cloth (1989)
Himself
La Veritaaa' (1982)
Antonio

Writer (Feature Film)

The Boom (2017)
From Story
The Boom (2017)
Screenplay
Un homme et son chien (2009)
Story By
A Walk in the Clouds (1995)
From Story
A Walk in the Clouds (1995)
Story By
The Garden of the Finzi-Continis (1987)
Screenplay
La Veritaaa' (1982)
Screenwriter
Un Cuore Semplice (1978)
Screenplay
The Children of Sanchez (1978)
Screenplay
Ligabue (1978)
Screenwriter
Una Breve Vacanza (1973)
Screenplay
We'll Call Him Andrea (1972)
Screenplay
Sunflower (1970)
Screenwriter
A Place for Lovers (1969)
Screenwriter
The Witches (1968)
Screenplay for "A Night Like Any Other"
The Witches (1968)
Story & Screenplay for "The Witch Burned Alive"
Woman Times Seven (1967)
Screenwriter
A Young World (1966)
Original Screenplay & dial
After the Fox (1966)
Screenwriter
The Doll That Took the Town (1965)
Screenwriter
Lipstick (1965)
Screenwriter
Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1964)
Screenplay for "Anna"
Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1964)
Screenplay for "Mara"
The Condemned of Altona (1963)
Screenplay (see note)
Boccaccio '70 (1962)
Devised by
Boccaccio '70 (1962)
Screenplay for "The Raffle"
Arturo's Island (1962)
Screenwriter
Two Women (1961)
Screenwriter
The Roof (1959)
Screenplay
The Awakening (1958)
Screenwriter
The Awakening (1958)
From Story
The Gold of Naples (1957)
Screenplay
The Virtuous Bigamist (1957)
From Original Screenplay ("Four Steps In The Clouds")
The Sign of Venus (1955)
Screenplay
Indiscretion of an American Wife (1954)
Screenwriter
Ali-Baba (1954)
Screenplay
Siamo Donne (1953)
Screenwriter
Love in the City (1953)
Screenwriter
Love in the City (1953)
From Story ("Tentato Suicidio"--"When Love Fails")
Umberto D. (1952)
From Story
Umberto D. (1952)
Screenplay
Bellissima (1951)
From Story
Miracle in Milan (1951)
From Story
Miracle in Milan (1951)
Screenplay
Bellissima (1951)
Story By
The Walls of Malapaga (1949)
From Story
The Walls of Malapaga (1949)
Screenplay
The Bicycle Thief (1948)
Screenplay
Shoeshine (1946)
Screenplay
The Children are Watching Us (1944)
Screenplay
Quattro Passi fra la Nuvole (1942)
Screenwriter

Producer (Feature Film)

Love in the City (1953)
Producer

Music (Feature Film)

La Veritaaa' (1982)
Music

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Strand: Under the Dark Cloth (1989)
Other
Ligabue (1978)
Other

Life Events

1935

Screenwriting debut with "Daro un Milione"

1941

First collaboration with Vittorio De Sica, "Teresa Venerdi"

1982

Film directing debut with "La Verita/The Truth"

Videos

Movie Clip

Umberto D. (1952) - Quiet Morning In Rome Following opening credits and a dedication to his father, director Vittorio De Sica introduces his title character, a professor and non-actor, Carlo Battisti, in post-war Rome, in Umberto D., 1952.
Umberto D. (1952) - Sentimental To Me Having sneaked away from his bed where he's feigning illness, Carlo Battisti (title character) sells his prized books, then enlists Maria (Maria Pia Casillo) to urge the landlady (Lina Gennari) to accept partial payment, in Vittorio De Sica's Umberto D., 1952.
Bicycle Thieves (1948) -- This Isn't A Pizzeria Antonio (Lamberto Maggiorani) decides he and Bruno (Enzo Staiola) deserve a break, expressing confidence he'll get his bike and his job back, in Vittorio De Sica's Bicycle Thieves, 1948.
Bicycle Thieves (1948) -- Open, Ricci Opening sequence and news of a job for Antonio (Lamberto Maggiorani), from Vittorio De Sica's neo-realist landmark, cast entirely with non-professional actors, Bicycle Thieves, 1948, from a novel by Luigi Bartolini.
Bicycle Thieves (1948) -- Three Doubles Three Singles Maria (Lianella Carell) figures out how to get the bicycle out of hock, rescuing Antonio (Lamberto Maggiorani) from his misery, in Vittorio De Sica's Bicycle Thieves, 1948.
Bicycle Thieves (1948) - You Look Like A Cop! Young Bruno (Enzo Staiola), Antonio (Lamberto Maggiorani) and Maria (Lianella Carell) prepare for the first day on the new job, in Vittorio De Sica's Bicycle Thieves, 1948.
Bicycle Thieves (1948) -- A Boy Is Drowning! Antonio (Lamberto Maggiorani) takes out his frustration on Bruno (Enzo Staiola) as they chase the old man who knows the thief, in Vittorio De Sica's Bicycle Thieves, 1948.
Two Women (1960) - Those Men Will Come Back Now on foot on their trek from wartime Rome to her rural home province, mother Cesira (Sophia Loren) and daughter Rosetta (Eleanora Brown) are also fleeing local fascist militia brigands, meeting a passerby as Allied aircraft roar overhead, in Vittorio De Sica’s drama of the “Marocchinate” war crime campaign, Two Women, 1960.
Two Women (1960) - Those Germans Aren't So Bad Fleeing Allied bombs in Rome, Cesira (Sophia Loren) and daughter Rosetta (Eleanora Brown), decide to walk when the train can't go on, amusing German soldiers, in Vittorio De Sica's drama of the war crime campaign known as the “Marocchinate,” Two Women, 1960.
Two Women (1960) - To A New World Cesira (Sophia Loren), Rosetta (Eleanora Brown) and their Marxist friend Michele (Jean-Paul Belmondo), are the only villagers willing to feed two English soldiers, in Vittorio De Sica's Two Women, 1960.
Umberto D. (1952) - For A Hole Like Thisi! Carlo Battisti (title character) returns home to find the landlady (Lina Gennari) is renting out his room by the hour, seeking support from servant Maria (Maria Pia Casillo), early in director Vittorio De Sica's Umberto D., 1952.
Gold Of Naples (1954) - At Your Service The celebrated Italian comic “Toto” is the father, Lianella Carrell his wife, griping about the racketeer who’s been dominating their home for ten years when he (Pasquale Cennamo) appears, demonstrating his power over the family, in the first vignette in Vittorio De Sica’s Gold Of Naples, 1954.

Trailer

Bibliography

"Straparole/Extra Words"
Cesare Zavattini (1967)
"Toto the Good"
Cesare Zavattini