Terence Young


Director
Terence Young

About

Birth Place
Shanghai, CN
Born
June 20, 1915
Died
September 08, 1994
Cause of Death
Heart Attack

Biography

Began his career as a screenwriter in the mid-1930s and, following WWII service, made his fiction directorial debut with "One Night With You" (1948). Young directed a number of routine British action films before hitting his stride in the 1960s with a series of James Bond extravaganzas, beginning with "Dr. No" (1962). His recent credits include "Inchon" (1982), one of the biggest commerc...

Biography

Began his career as a screenwriter in the mid-1930s and, following WWII service, made his fiction directorial debut with "One Night With You" (1948). Young directed a number of routine British action films before hitting his stride in the 1960s with a series of James Bond extravaganzas, beginning with "Dr. No" (1962). His recent credits include "Inchon" (1982), one of the biggest commercial disasters in the history of cinema.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

The Jigsaw Man (1984)
Director
Inchon (1982)
Director
Bloodline (1979)
Director
The Klansman (1974)
Director
Cold Sweat (1974)
Director
Le Guerriere dal seno nudo (1974)
Director
The Valachi Papers (1972)
Director
Red Sun (1971)
Director
The Christmas Tree (1969)
Director
Mayerling (1969)
Director
Wait Until Dark (1967)
Director
Triple Cross (1967)
Director
The Dirty Game (1966)
Director
Thunderball (1965)
Director
The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders (1965)
Director
From Russia With Love (1964)
Director
Duel of Champions (1964)
Director
Dr. No (1963)
Director
Immoral Charge (1962)
Director
Black Tights (1962)
Director
Too Hot To Handle (1961)
Director
Black Tights (1960)
Director
Tank Force (1958)
Director
Safari (1956)
Director
Zarak (1956)
Director
Storm Over the Nile (1956)
Director
That Lady (1955)
Director
Paratrooper (1954)
Director
Valley of the Eagles (1951)
Director
They Were Not Divided (1950)
Director
Corridor of Mirrors (1948)
Director
One Night With You (1948)
Director
Woman Hater (1948)
Director

Writer (Feature Film)

The Christmas Tree (1969)
Screenwriter
Mayerling (1969)
Screenwriter
Tank Force (1958)
Wrt by
The Bad Lord Byron (1948)
Screenwriter

Producer (Feature Film)

Where Is Parsifal? (1984)
Executive Producer

Production Companies (Feature Film)

Duel of Champions (1964)
Company

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Terror in the Aisles (1984)
Other

Cast (Short)

Vienna The Years Remembered (1968)
Himself

Director (TV Mini-Series)

The Poppy Is Also a Flower (1966)
Director

Life Events

1936

Began film career at British International Pictures; worked as scenarist, assistant director, dialogue director, often on films directed by B.D. Hurst

1944

Co-directing debut (with Hurst), the documentary "Men of Arnhem"

1948

Fiction feature directing debut, "One Night With You"; first of three films released that year

1966

US TV movie directing debut, "A Poppy is Also a Flower/Poppies Are Also Flowers"; anti-drug program produced by the United Nations; based on story by Ian Fleming

Videos

Movie Clip

Thunderball (1965) - Do I Seem Healthy? Perhaps the only scene in which Bond (Sean Connery) ever shouts "Help!", strapped to a traction table by the irritable Patricia (Molly Peters) in Thunderball, 1965.
Dr. No (1963) - Bond, James Bond At a London casino, Sean Connery is revealed in a most deliberate fashion in his very first appearance as James Bond, gaming with Sylvia Trench (Eunice Gayson) in Dr. No, 1963.
Thunderball (1965) - Credits, Title Song Tail end of the opening stunt leads to credit sequence for Thunderball, 1965, the fourth James Bond feature, title tune by John Barry and Don Black performed by Tom Jones.
Thunderball (1965) - Codename Thunderball Ken Adam's production design takes over as Moneypenny (Lois Maxwell) sends Bond (Sean Connery) to "the conference room" where M (Bernard Lee) and the Home Secretary (Roland Culver) preside in Thunderball, 1965.
Thunderball (1965) - The Little Fish I Throw Back Series of telling events as 007 (Sean Connery) greets Leiter (Rick von Nutter), discovers underling Quist (Bill Cummings) in his suite, and sends him back to Largo (Adolfo Celi) in Thunderball, 1965.
From Russsia With Love (1964) -- Things Are Shaping Up Nicely With his notably competent colleague, MI-6 Istanbul station chief Kerim Bey (Pedro Armendariz), who is irritated after his office was bombed, James Bond (Sean Connery) enters the (actual!) Basilica Cistern to eavesdrop on the Russian neighbors, noticing Krilencu (Fred Haggerty), in the second 007 feature, From Russia With Love, 1964.
From Russsia With Love (1964) -- Theme, Kronsteen Only the second iteration of the James Bond theme, with the memorable belly-dancer titles, leading to Venice, a fictional chess tournament but the game based on a real Soviet championship match, with SPECTRE man Kronsteen (Vladek Sheybal) coming out on top, in From Russia With Love, 1964, starring Sean Connery.
Thunderball (1965) - Opening, Bouvar Funeral Opening stunt from Thunderball finds 007 (Sean Connery) attending a "funeral," killing a guy in a dress then escaping via what must be the silliest gadget-based look in the Connery-James Bond canon.
Thunderball (1965) - You Seem To Be Unbeatable Chemin De Fer in the Bahamas with Largo (Adolfo Celi) occasions testy conversation and an escape with Domino (Claudine Auger) for 007 (Sean Connery) in Thunderball, 1965.
From Russia With Love (1964) - Grant, That's Excellent Opening of the second James Bond feature From Russia With Love, 1964, and the first pre-credit action sequence, featuring 007 (Sean Connery) being stalked by Spectre agent Grant (Robert Shaw), sort of.
From Russia With Love (1964) - My Friends Call Me Tania 007 (Sean Connery) orders room service then comes upon Tatiana (Daniela Bianchi), the infatuated Russian cypher clerk, for the first time in the second James Bond feature From Russia With Love, 1964.
Dr. No (1963) - Opening, Three Blind Mice Opening title sequence for the first James Bond feature Dr. No, 1963, starring Sean Connery, and introducing three Jamaican "blind mice" who are up to no good.

Trailer

Bibliography