Shelley Winters


Actor
Shelley Winters

About

Also Known As
Shelley Winter, Shirley Schrift, Miss Shelley Winters
Birth Place
St Louis, Missouri, USA
Born
August 18, 1920
Died
January 14, 2006
Cause of Death
Heart Failure

Biography

Over a six-decade (and counting) career, Brooklyn-born Shelley Winters has proven to be a highly prolific, galvanic presence on stage and screen. As a teenager, she auditioned for the coveted role of Scarlett O'Hara in her thick "Noo Yawk" accent, prompting director George Cukor to suggest she consider college. Undaunted, Winters persisted and landed an understudy job for the 1940 Broadw...

Photos & Videos

The Poseidon Adventure - Movie Posters
Saskatchewan - Movie Posters
Saskatchewan - British Front-of-House Stills

Family & Companions

Paul Meyer
Husband
Textile salesman. Married in October 1943; divorced in 1946.
Vittorio Gassman
Husband
Italian actor. Married on April 28, 1952; divorced in 1954.
Anthony Franciosa
Husband
Actor. Married on May 4, 1957; divorced in November 1960.

Bibliography

"Shelley II: The Middle of My Century (The Best of Times, the Worst of Times)"
Shelley Winters, Simon & Schuster (1989)
"Shelley, Also Known as Shirley"
Shelley Winters (1980)

Notes

In the 1940s when both were struggling actresses, Winters and Marilyn Monroe shared an apartment

She donated her 1959 Oscar to the Anne Frank Home in Amsterdam.

Biography

Over a six-decade (and counting) career, Brooklyn-born Shelley Winters has proven to be a highly prolific, galvanic presence on stage and screen. As a teenager, she auditioned for the coveted role of Scarlett O'Hara in her thick "Noo Yawk" accent, prompting director George Cukor to suggest she consider college. Undaunted, Winters persisted and landed an understudy job for the 1940 Broadway production of "The Time of Your Life." The following year, she made her Broadway debut in "The Night Before Christmas." A voluptuous bottle blonde, the actress soon caught the attention of talent scouts and was put under contract by Columbia Pictures in 1943. Underutilized, Winters auditioned for and landed a role in "Knickerbocker Holiday" (1944) at United Artists upsetting studio head Harry Cohn who eventually dropped her option.

After Columbia released her, George Cukor came to Winters' rescue, casting her in a major part in "A Double Life" (1947). The film proved a breakthrough, offering her a meaty role as a buxom waitress who falls for an actor (Ronald Coleman) gearing up to play Othello. Additionally, it provided Winters with the first of her many memorable on-screen death scenes. Before signing a seven-year contact with Universal on strength of her work, she returned to Broadway to play Ado Annie (the girl who can't say no) in the hit stage musical "Oklahoma!."

Once back in Hollywood and working at Universal, Winters became typecast as, in her words, "the bad blonde bimbo usually going up against the sweet brunette." She fared slightly better as the tarty wife of a slow-witted mechanic in 1949's "The Great Gatsby" and cut a fine figure as a dance hall girl torn between Charles Drake and James Stewart in the fine Western "Winchester '73" (1950). Winters fought hard to land the role of the mousy factory worker who falls for a cad in George Stevens' "A Place in the Sun" (1951). The director initially did not want to cast her because of her brassy screen persona. Winters met with him, dressed down, without make-up. Stevens was impressed enough but asked her to test for the role which the actress managed to avoid. The director eventually gave her the part and elicited one of her finest screen portrayals which earned her a Best Actress Oscar nomination. The downside was that it created a new screen persona for Winters: that of the frowsy, blowsy harridan. She embodied these characteristics in such acclaimed films as "Executive Suite" (1954) and "The Big Knife" (1955). Charles Laughton also tapped into that vein when he cast her as the lusty widow of a bank robber who falls victim to a charismatic con (Robert Mitchum) in the superb "Night of the Hunter" (also 1955).

Feeling a need to reinvigorate her career, Winters took four years away from Hollywood to study at the Actors Studio and return to Broadway as the wife of a drug addict in "A Hatful of Rain" (1956). When she ventured back to L.A., she embarked on a career as a character player with roles like the loquacious Mrs. Van Daan in George Stevens' screen adaptation of "The Diary of Anne Frank" (1959), for which she picked up a Best Supporting Actress Oscar. Winters made an indelible impression as the pathetically lovelorn Charlotte Haze in "Lolita" (1962). The 60s saw her undertake a string of memorable roles, the best being her Oscar-winning turn as the bigoted Southern mother of a blind girl in "A Patch of Blue" (1965).

Since the late 60s, however, her work has been in substandard vehicles, partly from her seemingly endless stream of projects. Winters had lent her considerable talents to roles that bordered on camp ("Who Slew Auntie Roo?" and "What's the Matter With Helen?" both 1971) to memorable (her Oscar-nominated turn as an elderly former swimming champion in "The Poseidon Adventure" in 1972 and the Machiavellian agent in "S.O.B." in 1981). Among her more recent work was the accompanist to a motley group of tap dancers in "Stepping Out" (1991) and a lovely cameo as the wife of the dying John Gielgud in Jane Campion's "The Portrait of a Lady" (1996). Perhaps ironically, though, despite accolades, status as one of the leading teachers and practitioners of "the Method," over 100 films and numerous stage credits and two volumes of memoirs, Winters became best known to an entirely new generation for her six-year (1991-97) recurring role as Nana Mary on the hit ABC sitcom "Roseanne."

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

Once Upon a Time in Little Italy (1999)
Professor Summers
Gideon (1998)
Mrs. Munck (1996)
The Portrait of a Lady (1996)
Mrs Touchett
Raging Angels (1995)
Back Fire! (1995)
Jury Duty (1995)
The Silence Of The Hams (1994)
A Century Of Cinema (1994)
Heavy (1994)
Dolly
The Pickle (1993)
Stepping Out (1991)
Superstar: The Life and Times of Andy Warhol (1990)
Herself
Touch of a Stranger (1990)
An Unremarkable Life (1989)
Purple People Eater (1988)
Hello Actors Studio (1987)
Herself
Marilyn Monroe: Beyond the Legend (1986)
Interviewee
The Delta Force (1986)
Edie Kaplan
Over The Brooklyn Bridge (1984)
Becky Sherman
Witchfire (1984)
Lydia
Deja Vu (1984)
Olga Nabokov
Ellie (1984)
Cora
Fanny Hill (1983)
Very Close Quarters (1983)
Galina
My Mother, My Daughter (1981)
Mother
S.O.B. (1981)
Eva Brown
Acting: Lee Strasberg and The Actors Studio (1981)
Herself
Looping (1981)
Carmen
The Magician of Lublin (1979)
Elizabeta
The Visitor (1979)
Jane Phillips
Elvis (1979)
City on Fire (1979)
The Initiation of Sarah (1978)
King Of The Gypsies (1978)
An Average Man (1977)
Amalia Vivaldi
Tentacles (1977)
Pete's Dragon (1977)
Lena Gogan
Journey Into Fear (1976)
Next Stop, Greenwich Village (1976)
The Tenant (1976)
Diamonds (1975)
Zelda Shapiro
Poor Pretty Eddie (1975)
That Lucky Touch (1975)
Diana Steedeman
The Sex Symbol (1974)
Big Rose (1974)
Blume in Love (1973)
Cleopatra Jones (1973)
The Devil's Daughter (1973)
The Poseidon Adventure (1972)
Belle Rosen
The Adventures of Nick Carter (1972)
What's the Matter with Helen? (1971)
Helen [Hill]
Who Slew Auntie Roo? (1971)
Mrs. [Rosie] Forrest
Revenge (1971)
A Death of Innocence (1971)
Elizabeth Cameron
Something to Hide (1971)
Gabriella
Flap (1970)
Dorothy Bluebell
Bloody Mama (1970)
Kate "Ma" Barker
How Do I Love Thee? (1970)
Lena Mervin
The Mad Room (1969)
Mrs. Armstrong
Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell (1969)
Shirley Newman
The Scalphunters (1968)
Kate
Wild in the Streets (1968)
Mrs. Flatow
Enter Laughing (1967)
Mrs. Kolowitz
Harper (1966)
Fay Estabrook
Alfie (1966)
Ruby
A Patch of Blue (1965)
Rose-Ann D'Arcey
Time of Indifference (1965)
Lisa
The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965)
Woman of no name [see note]
A House Is Not a Home (1964)
Polly Adler
Wives and Lovers (1963)
Fran Cabrell
The Balcony (1963)
Madam Irma
The Chapman Report (1962)
Sarah Garnell
Lolita (1962)
Charlotte Haze
The Young Savages (1961)
Mary Di Pace
Let No Man Write My Epitaph (1960)
Nellie Romano
Odds Against Tomorrow (1959)
Lorry
The Diary of Anne Frank (1959)
Mrs. Petronela Van Daan
Cash on Delivery (1956)
Myrtle La Mar
The Treasure of Pancho Villa (1955)
Ruth Harris
Mambo (1955)
Tony Burns
The Night of the Hunter (1955)
Willa Harper
I Died a Thousand Times (1955)
Marie Garson
The Big Knife (1955)
Dixie Evans
I Am a Camera (1955)
Natalie Landauer
Playgirl (1954)
Fran [Davis]
Tennessee Champ (1954)
Sarah Wurble
Executive Suite (1954)
Eva Bardeman
Saskatchewan (1954)
Grace [Markey]
Phone Call from a Stranger (1952)
Binky Gay, also known as Bianca Carr
Meet Danny Wilson (1952)
Joy Carroll
Untamed Frontier (1952)
Jane Stevens
My Man and I (1952)
Nancy
A Place in the Sun (1951)
Alice Tripp
The Raging Tide (1951)
Connie Thatcher
Frenchie (1951)
Frenchie Fontaine
Behave Yourself! (1951)
Kate Denny
He Ran All the Way (1951)
Peg Dobbs
Winchester '73 (1950)
Lola Manners
South Sea Sinner (1950)
Coral
The Great Gatsby (1949)
Myrtle Wilson
Take One False Step (1949)
Catherine Sykes
Johnny Stool Pigeon (1949)
Terry [Stewart]
Cry of the City (1948)
Brenda
A Double Life (1948)
Pat Kroll
Larceny (1948)
Tory
Red River (1948)
Girl with wagon train
Killer McCoy (1947)
Woman in automobile
The Gangster (1947)
Hazel
Living in a Big Way (1947)
Junior League girl
Two Smart People (1946)
Princess
Abie's Irish Rose (1946)
Bridesmaid
Tonight and Every Night (1945)
Bubbles
A Thousand and One Nights (1945)
Handmaiden
The Fighting Guardsman (1945)
Nanette
Escape in the Fog (1945)
Taxi driver
Sailor's Holiday (1944)
Gloria Flynn
Dancing in Manhattan (1944)
Margie
Together Again (1944)
Girl
She's a Soldier Too (1944)
"Silver" Rankin
Knickerbocker Holiday (1944)
Ulda Tienhoven
There's Something About a Soldier (1943)
Norma
What a Woman! (1943)
Actress

Producer (Feature Film)

Witchfire (1984)
Associate Producer

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Superstar: The Life and Times of Andy Warhol (1990)
Other
Hello Actors Studio (1987)
Other
Acting: Lee Strasberg and The Actors Studio (1981)
Other

Cast (Special)

Jack Palance: From Grit to Grace (2001)
On Cukor (2000)
The 70th Annual Academy Awards (1998)
Performer
Marlon Brando, Wild One (1994)
Street Scenes: New York on Film (1992)
AFI Salute to Sidney Poitier (1992)
Performer
Miracle on 44th Street: A Portrait of the Actors Studio (1991)
Montgomery Clift: His Place in the Sun (1989)
Broadway Dreamers: The Legacy of the Group Theatre (1989)
George Stevens: A Filmmaker's Journey (1984)
Herself
Parade of Stars (1983)
Bob Hope Special: Bob Hope's Women I Love - Beautiful but Funny (1982)

Misc. Crew (Special)

George Stevens: A Filmmaker's Journey (1984)
Other

Cast (TV Mini-Series)

Weep No More My Lady (1992)
Alice in Wonderland (1985)
Rudolph & Frosty's Christmas in July (1979)
Voice
The French Atlantic Affair (1979)
Frosty's Winter Wonderland (1976)
Voice

Life Events

1938

Auditioned for the role of Scarlett O'Hara in "Gone With the Wind"; George Cukor reportedly told her she should attend college

1940

Stage debut as understudy in "The Time of Your Life"

1941

Made her Broadway debut in "The Night Before Christmas."

1943

Signed to a contract by Columbia Pictures

1943

Film acting debut in "What a Woman!"

1944

Appeared in "Knickerbocker Holiday", billed as Shelley Winter

1947

Played Ado Annie on Broadway in the musical "Oklahoma!"

1947

Appeared in the film noir "A Double Life."

1948

Played small role in "Red River", starring John Wayne and Montgomery Clift

1948

Signed seven-year contract with Universal

1951

Earned praise for her role in "A Place in the Sun."

1955

Portrayed the promiscuous shopgirl Crystal Allen in NBC version of "The Women"

1955

Co-starred in the thriller "The Night of the Hunter."

1955

Starred in "A Hatful of Rain" on Broadway.

1959

Received first Academy Award as Best Supporting Actress for her performance as Mrs Van Daan in the film version of "The Diary of Anne Frank", directed by George Stevens

1962

Played Charlotte, mother to the title character in "Lolita."

1962

Succeeded Bette Davis in the role of Maxine Faulk in Tennessee Williams' "The Night of the Iguana"

1964

Appeared in featured role in the Actors Studio film version of "Three Sisters", starring Geraldine Page

1964

Received Emmy for appearance in "Two Is the Number", a drama special aired as part of "Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre" (NBC)

1965

Co-starred in the romantic drama "A Patch of Blue."

1970

Played Minnie Shean Marx in "Minnie's Boys", the unsuccessful musical biography of the Marx Brothers

1970

Starred in the Roger Corman film "Bloody Mama"; first time working with Robert De Niro

1971

TV-movie debut in ABC's "Revenge"

1972

Won acclaim for her performance in "The Poseidon Adventure."

1973

Debut as playwright with "One Night Stands of a Noisy Passenger", a series of three one-act plays; hand-picked Robert De Niro for one of the roles

1973

Played a cameo role in the landmark blaxploitation film "Cleopatra Jones."

1974

Starred as Rose Winters (a character named after her real-life mother) in the CBS TV-movie "Big Rose", an unsold series pilot

1976

Acted the role of the Concierge in Roman Polanski's thriller "The Tenant"

1977

Co-starred in the fantastical family movie "Pete's Dragon."

1978

Co-starred on Broadway in "The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds."

1979

Played Gladys Presley in the acclaimed ABC biopic "Elvis", starring Kurt Russell and directed by John Carpenter

1981

Cast as a duplicitous agent in Blake Edwards' satirical "S.O.B."

1986

Appeared in the action movie "The Delta Force."

1991

Appeared with Liza Minnelli in the comedy "Stepping Out."

1991

Took on the recurring role of the title character's grandmother on the sitcom "Roseanne."

1995

Cast as Pauly Shore's mother in the lame comedy "Jury Duty"

1995

Co-starred in "Heavy"

1996

Played small role of Mrs Touchette in Jane Campion's "The Portrait of a Lady"

1996

Had supporting role in Diane Ladd's TV directorial debut, the Showtime movie "Mrs. Munck"

1999

Acted in "La Bomba", featuring ex-husband Vittorio Gassman and his son Alessandro

1999

Played a retirement home resident in "Gideon's Web"; shown at the Cannes Film Festival market

Photo Collections

The Poseidon Adventure - Movie Posters
The Poseidon Adventure - Movie Posters
Saskatchewan - Movie Posters
Saskatchewan - Movie Posters
Saskatchewan - British Front-of-House Stills
Saskatchewan - British Front-of-House Stills
Saskatchewan - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Saskatchewan - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Winchester '73 - Movie Posters
Winchester '73 - Movie Posters
Executive Suite - Group Publicity Stills
Here is a series of publicity stills taken of the all-star cast of Executive Suite (1954). Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
A Place in the Sun - Lobby Cards
Here are a few Lobby Cards from A Place in the Sun (1951), directed by George Stevens. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Alfie - Movie Poster
Here is the American One-Sheet Movie Poster from Alfie (1966), starring Michael Caine. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Lolita - Peter Sellers Scene Stills
Here are several scene stills from Stanley Kubrick's Lolita (1962), all of them featuring Peter Sellers as Clare Quilty.
A Patch of Blue - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are a few photos taken during the making of A Patch of Blue (1965).
The Night of the Hunter - Pressbook
Here is the campaign book (pressbook) for The Night of the Hunter (1955), directed by Charles Laughton. Pressbooks were sent to exhibitors and theater owners to aid them in publicizing the film's run in their theater.
Lolita - Pressbook
Here is the campaign book (pressbook) for MGM's Lolita (1962), directed by Stanley Kubrick. Pressbooks were sent to exhibitors and theater owners to aid them in publicizing the film's run in their theater.
Poor Pretty Eddie - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for Poor Pretty Eddie (1975), starring Michael Christian, Leslie Uggams, and Shelley Winters. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Behave Yourself! - Lobby Cards
Here are several Lobby Cards from RKO's Behave Yourself! (1951), starring Shelley Winters and Farley Granger. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Executive Suite - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for Executive Suite (1954). One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.

Videos

Movie Clip

Diary Of Anne Frank, The (1959) - Have You Seen My Shoes? Life in the attic apartment, Anne (Millie Perkins) first writing and narrating, then taunting Peter (Richard Beymer), his mother (Shelley Winters) and her father (Joseph Schildkraut) supporting, in George Stevens' The Diary Of Anne Frank, 1959.
Diary Of Anne Frank, The (1959) - Bring Only What You Can Carry Delivered by the hosts (Douglas Spencer, Dody Heath) and introduced to the hidden family (including Joseph Schildkraut, Shelley Winters, Millie Perkins as the title character and Lou Jacobi as Van Daan), dentist Dussell (Ed Wynn) brings harrowing news of Amsterdam, in George Stevens’ The Diary Of Anne Frank, 1959.
Diary Of Anne Frank, The (1959) - Was It A Very Bad Dream? A dream sequence from screenwriters Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett, from their play and directed by George Stevens, Millie Perkins as the title character, in Amsterdam ca. 1944, imagining scenes of German concentration camps that have been described only by hearsay, Gusti Huber as her mother, in The Diary Of Anne Frank, 1959.
Flap (1970) - Dorothy Bluebell No dialogue and maybe some stereotyping, as Anthony Quinn (title character “Flapping Eagle”) and pals (Claude Akins, Tony Bill), flush with cash, arrive at the brothel run by Dorothy (Shelley Winters, her first scene), in Flap, 1970, directed by Carol Reed from a Clair Huffaker novel.
Blume In Love (1973) - I Hope The Plane Crashes! Susan Anspach as Nina, wife of the divorce-lawyer title character (George Segal), in her job at the California welfare office, in writer-director Paul Mazursky’s non-linear narrative, meeting Kris Kristofferson as Elmo, then a clever edit to Shelley Winters as an aggrieved client, early in Blume In Love, 1973.
Odds Against Tomorrow (1959) - Where The Money Comes From First scene for Shelley Winters as "Lorry," waking as boyfriend Slater (Robert Ryan), worried that she's paying all the bills, is leaving to scout a bank job, in Robert Wise's Odds Against Tomorrow, 1959.
Cleopatra Jones (1973) - See You Around, Super Honkie Confrontation here between brassy LA heroin trafficker “Mommy” (Shelley Winters) and her top distributor Doodlebug (Antonio Fargas), who wants to cut a new deal, and feels sure she can handle the threat posed by the federal agent title character, in Cleopatra Jones< 1973.
Phone Call From A Stranger (1952) - You're All Married Binky (top-billed Shelley Winters), nervous about the weather before her first airplane flight, makes a second approach to Gary Merrill, whom we know is leaving his wife and traveling under an assumed name, when they’re joined by Keenan Wynn and Michael Rennie, with extensive exposition, in Jean Negulesco’s Phone Call From A Stranger, 1952, produced and written by Nunnally Johnson from an I.A.R. Wylie novelette.
Chapman Report, The (1962) - Taking Those Diet Pills Arrived home from the introductory talk by the folks conducting the sex survey, Sarah (Shelley Winters) with husband Frank (Harold J. Stone), and in flashback revealing her affair with Fred (Ray Danton), in The Chapman Report, 1962, directed by George Cukor.
Poseidon Adventure, The (1972) - Six Hundred Pound Swordfish Priest Gene Hackman leads survivors toward the hull of the flipped ocean liner, Roddy McDowall the injured waiter, Shelley Winters and Jack Albertson the retirees, Pamela Sue Martin a frightened teen, Carol Lynley the lounge singer, Ernest Borgnine the surly cop, Stella Stevens his increasingly disrobed wife, in The Poseidon Adventure, 1972.
Pete's Dragon (1977) - Happiest Home In These Hills The opening, in which one of the two title characters seems invisible, introducing Sean Marshall as Pete, and Shelley Winters, leading the Gogans (Charles Tyner, Gary Morgan and Jeff “Kenickie” Conaway!), his evil adoptive family, song by Al Kasha and Joel Hischhorn, in Disney’s Pete’s Dragon, 1977.
Winchester '73 - Shiloh And Bull Run Lin and High Spade (James Stewart, Millard Mitchell) continuing their trek at night, encounter Indians, then Cavalry commanded by Wilkes (Jay C. Flippen), also acquaintance Lola (Shelley Winters) and her beau Steve (Charles Drake), trouble brewing, in Anthony Mann's Winchester '73, 1950.

Trailer

Diary of Anne Frank, The (1959) -- (Original Trailer) Theatrical trailer for producer-director George Stevens’ adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hacket, based on the original diary, The Diary Of Anne Frank, 1959, starring Millie Perkins.
Winchester '73 - (Re-issue Trailer) A man (James Stewart) combs the West in search of his stolen rifle. Co-starring Shelley Winters. Directed by Anthony Mann.
Bloody Mama (1970) Original Trailer Original trailer with twisted content right up front, and commentary resembling critical praise for producer-director Roger Corman, for Bloody Mama, 1970, from American International Pictures, with Shelley Winters, Robert De Niro and Bruce Dern.
S.O.B. (1981) -- (Original Trailer) Emphasis on the writer-director, his wife Julie Andrews, his company of Hollywood veteran pals, and Robert Preston getting the best lines, the original trailer for Blake Edwards’ indulgent satire, S.O.B., 1981.
Cleopatra Jones (1973) -- (Original Trailer) Made for TV trailer does little justice to the big-budget Warner Bros. “Blaxploitation” feature Cleopatra Jones, 1973, starring Tamara Dobson, which made enough money to justify an even more expensive sequel.
Tentacles - (Original Trailer) A giant octopus attacks a seaside resort in Tentacles (1977) starring John Huston and Shelley Winters.
Stepping Out - (Original Trailer) A Broadway burn-out (Liza Minnelli) turns a tap-dancing class into a life-changing experience for all involved in Stepping Out (1991).
Harper - (Original Trailer) A broken-down private eye (Paul Newman) sets out to find a rich woman's missing husband in Harper (1966).
Greatest Story Ever Told, The - (Original Trailer) The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965) is an epic re-telling of the life of Christ, directed by George Stevens and starring Max Von Sydow, Dorothy McGuire, Claude Rains and many more
Scalphunters, The - (Original Trailer) A trapper (Burt Lancaster) and his educated slave (Ossie Davis) track an outlaw band in Sydney Pollack's The Scalphunters (1968).
Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell - (Original Trailer) Gina Lollobrigida leads three U.S. veterans to believe each is the father of her child in Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell (1968).
Alfie - (U.S. Trailer) What's it all about? Ask Alfie (1966), Michael Caine in one of his greatest roles as a love-em-and-leave-em lothario.

Promo

Family

Jonas Schrift
Father
Clothing designer.
Rose Schrift
Mother
Singer.
Vittoria Gassman
Daughter
Physician. Born c. 1953.

Companions

Paul Meyer
Husband
Textile salesman. Married in October 1943; divorced in 1946.
Vittorio Gassman
Husband
Italian actor. Married on April 28, 1952; divorced in 1954.
Anthony Franciosa
Husband
Actor. Married on May 4, 1957; divorced in November 1960.

Bibliography

"Shelley II: The Middle of My Century (The Best of Times, the Worst of Times)"
Shelley Winters, Simon & Schuster (1989)
"Shelley, Also Known as Shirley"
Shelley Winters (1980)

Notes

In the 1940s when both were struggling actresses, Winters and Marilyn Monroe shared an apartment

She donated her 1959 Oscar to the Anne Frank Home in Amsterdam.

In her memoirs, Winters recounts her many love affairs, including those with Errol Flynn, Marlon Brando, Burt Lancaster, Adlai Stevenson, Sean Connery and William Holden, among others

"She is eccentric, highly gifted, unique, unusual, creative--and off-the-wall. Working with Shelley is extraordinarily challenging. She is extremely difficult to work with. I found that not to be helpful for my work. She said I was better because she was difficult. I say it would have been easier or better for my health to have had a little less turmoil on the set." --Debbie Reynolds, co-star of "What's the Matter With Helen?", quoted in LOS ANGELES TIMES, April 9, 1995

"I think that because Shelley was a pretty, zaftig blonde and worked in the era of where those movie role proliferated, she played a lot of not-so-birght roles, victims and floozies--and yet somehow, you always knew that there was a strength there. She never seemed to feel she had to adopt a masculine style in order to show that she was strong." --Gloria Steinem quoted in LOS ANGELES TIMES, April 9, 1995

"I'll tell you, I'm a little confused about why there;s all this interest in me. In 'Mrs. Doubtfire', Robin Williams says he wants to get older, and Harvey Fierstein says 'Like Shirley MacLaine or Shelley Winters?' Then, in 'The Adventures of Prsicilla, Queen of the Desert'. one of those men says ,'Take that off. Who do you think you are, Shelley Winters?' [Laughs] Now, I haven't been a babe for a long time, you know. And there's a wonderful picture called 'Swimming With Sharks'; under the titles, this agent trying to tell these young producers who I am, trying to get me a part. Nothing was really insulting, except one of them said I looked older, but I think I prefer to look older than have things operated on. . . . Why, all of a sudden am I public domain. I mean, I've been here all the time!" --Shelley Winters in INTERVIEW, May 1966

"The ONLY love scene I ever tried to do was in 'Lolita' with James Mason. I had to lower my robe and snuggle up to him in bed. I couldn't do it. I knocked him out of bed and broke his glasses." --Winters in PREMIERE, January 1995

"I've got four Oscar nominations and two Oscars, and guess what? Peole know me from 'Roseanne', where I play her grandmother." --Winters to PEOPLE, December 16, 1996

Winters was honored with a lifetime achievement award at the Hollywood Film Festival in August 1998.

She was quoted in THE NEW YORK TIMES in July 1998 as admitting she had been lying about her age for years and that in reality she was born in 1920 not 1922 as all the record books list.