Tim Whelan


Director

About

Birth Place
Cannelton, Indiana, USA
Born
November 02, 1893
Died
August 12, 1957

Biography

Tim Whelan was an accomplished director with a unique attention to detail that really made his productions stand out from the norm. Whelan's career began with his screenplays being featured in comedy films such as "Safety Last" (1923) starring Harold Lloyd, "The Freshman" (1925) with Harold Lloyd and Jobyna Ralston and "Exit Smiling" (1926) with Beatrice Lillie and Jack Pickford. He a...

Biography

Tim Whelan was an accomplished director with a unique attention to detail that really made his productions stand out from the norm. Whelan's career began with his screenplays being featured in comedy films such as "Safety Last" (1923) starring Harold Lloyd, "The Freshman" (1925) with Harold Lloyd and Jobyna Ralston and "Exit Smiling" (1926) with Beatrice Lillie and Jack Pickford. He also appeared in "Tramp, Tramp, Tramp" (1926) with Harry Langdon and "Hook, Line and Sinker" (1930). He continued to work in film in the thirties, directing motion pictures like "It's a Boy" (1933), the Spencer Tracy crime picture "The Murder Man" (1935) and "Action For Slander" (1937). Nearing the end of his career, Whelan directed "Seven Days Leave" (1942) with Victor Mature, "Twin Beds" (1942) and the adaptation "Higher and Higher" (1943) with Michèle Morgan. He also appeared in the musical "Step Lively" (1944) with Frank Sinatra and the musical comedy "Swing Fever" (1944) with Kay Kyser. Whelan last directed the Claudette Colbert western "Texas Lady" (1955). Whelan passed away in August 1957 at the age of 64.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

The Mountain Road (1960)
Assistant Director
Texas Lady (1955)
Director
Rage at Dawn (1955)
Director
This Was a Woman (1948)
Director
Badman's Territory (1946)
Director
Swing Fever (1944)
Director
Step Lively (1944)
Director
Higher and Higher (1943)
Director
Twin Beds (1942)
Director
Nightmare (1942)
Director
Seven Days' Leave (1942)
Director
International Lady (1941)
Director
The Mad Doctor (1941)
Director
The Thief of Bagdad (1940)
Director
Clouds over Europe (1939)
Director
The Divorce of Lady X (1938)
Director
St. Martin's Lane (1938)
Director
Action for Slander (1938)
Director
Troopship (1937)
Director
Smash and Grab (1937)
Director
The Mill On The Floss (1937)
Director
Two's Company (1936)
Director
Murder Man (1935)
Director
The Perfect Gentleman (1935)
Director
It's a Boy (1934)
Director
Along Came Sally (1934)
Director
The Camels Are Coming (1934)
Director
Aunt Sally (1933)
Director
Adam's Apple (1928)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

The Perfect Gentleman (1935)
Usher

Writer (Feature Film)

The Mill On The Floss (1937)
Screenwriter
Smash and Grab (1937)
From Story
Two's Company (1936)
Screenwriter
Murder Man (1935)
Screenwriter
Murder Man (1935)
Story
Along Came Sally (1934)
Story
The Camels Are Coming (1934)
From Story
Out All Night (1933)
Original Story
Girl Crazy (1932)
Screenwriter
The Crooked Circle (1932)
Additional Dialogue
Hold 'Em Jail (1932)
Story
Everything's Rosie (1931)
Screenwriter
Peach-O-Reno (1931)
Adapted and dial
Peach-O-Reno (1931)
[Wrt] by
Hook, Line and Sinker (1930)
Screenwriter
The Fall Guy (1930)
Screenwriter
Hook, Line and Sinker (1930)
Story
The Fall Guy (1930)
Dial
Hook, Line and Sinker (1930)
Dial
Adam's Apple (1928)
From Story
My Best Girl (1927)
Adaptation
Tramp, Tramp, Tramp (1926)
Story
Exit Smiling (1926)
Scen
The Strong Man (1926)
Writer
Girl Shy (1924)
Story
Hot Water (1924)
Story
Safety Last! (1923)
Story

Producer (Feature Film)

Higher and Higher (1943)
Producer
Seven Days' Leave (1942)
Producer

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

The Sin of Harold Diddlebock (1947)
Scen, <I>The Freshman</I>

Life Events

1920

Screenwriting debut

1928

Directing debut with "Adam's Apple"

Videos

Movie Clip

Swing Fever (1943) - You're So Indifferent Kay Kyser introduces the song, Lena Horne as herself, with You're So Indifferent, by Sammy Fain and Mitchell Parish, edited so that it could be removed by theater owners in the South, as was MGM's regular practice at the time, in Swing Fever, 1943.
Seven Days' Leave (1942) - A Touch Of Texas G-I Johnny (Victor Mature), about to inherit big money on the condition that he marry a daughter of the Havelock-Allen family, with buddies Speak and Bitsy (Peter Lind Hayes, Arnold Stang) and lawyer Gildersleeve (Harold Peary) meets singing Mickey (Marcy McGuire, rehearsing a Jimmy McHugh/Frank Loesser tune with Freddy Martin’s group) and dishy Terry (Lucille Ball), in RKO’s Seven Days’ Leave, 1942.
Seven Days' Leave (1942) - Can't Get Out Of This Mood Following complex machinations, G-I Johnny (Victor Mature) is about to confess to heiress Terry (Lucille Ball) that his romancing is motivated partly by a big inheritance, not realizing she’s way ahead of him, we cut to Ginny Simms with the Freddy Martin Orchestra, and another Jimmy McHugh/Frank Loesser tune, in RKO’s Seven Days’ Leave, 1942.
Seven Days' Leave (1942) - You Speak My Language With Les Brown’s band playing at a G-I sendoff, the three ex-member buddies (Peter Lind Hayes as “Speak,” singer Buddy Clark as himself and Victor Mature as trumpeter Johnny) are asked to join, along with Vic/Johnny’s gal, Mapy Cortes, leading in a Jimmy McHugh/Frank Loesser original, in RKO’s Seven Days’ Leave, 1942, choreography by Chuck Walters.
Thief Of Bagdad, The (1940) - This Is No Dog Plenty of spectacle in the opening scene, introducing the evil magician Jaffar (Conrad Veidt) arriving in Basra, and the not-much-explained "Blind Man" (John Justin), in Alexander Korda's The Thief Of Bagdad, 1940.
Thief Of Bagdad, The (1940) - Free, Free, After Two Thousand Years Abu (Sabu), shipwrecked by his evil magician enemy, discovers a bottle, the not overly bright Djinn (Rex Ingram) inside, one of the more famous effects from producer Alexander Korda's The Thief Of Bagdad, 1940.
Murder Man, The (1935) - Very Fatally Dead In the press room at the precinct, crime beat reporters (William Demarest, Bobby Watson, Lucien Littlefield, Fuzzy Knight, and James Stewart as "Shorty") get word of a big time killing, early in The Murder Man, 1935.
Murder Man, The (1935) - Cynical Drunken Bum First appearance for the much sought after murder specialist reporter Steve Grey (Spencer Tracy), returned from a bender and visiting Mary (Virginia Bruce) and Robins (Robert Barrat) in the newsroom, in The Murder Man, 1935.
Murder Man, The (1936) - I'll Be At Sing Sing Advice columnist Mary (Virginia Bruce) drops in on vacationing crime reporter Steve (Spencer Tracy), not realizing Shorty (James Stewart) has arrived in her rumble seat with a message from their editor, in The Murder Man, 1935.
Everything's Rosie (1931) - I Couldn't Swipe A Piano First appearance for Anita Louise, age 16, as the title character, now grown-up Rosie, with Robert Woolsey (working without his comedy partner Bert Wheeler) as carnival snake-oil salesman Droop, ten years after he added her to his act, in RKO’s Everything’s Rosie, 1931.
Everything's Rosie (1931) - We've Been In Muddier Towns Now doing a gypsy schtick at the traveling carnival, Anita Louise, the title character, meets good-natured local law student Billy (John Darrow), while her partner (Robert Woolsey as Droop, now telling fortunes) processes an uncredited customer, in RKO’s Woolsey-without-Wheeler programmer Everything’s Rosie, 1931.
Freshman, The (1925) - Opening, College Yells Opening credits and introduction of producer and star Harold Lloyd (as budding college man "Harold Lamb), along with his parents, from the 1925 silent comedy hit The Freshman.

Bibliography