Harry Waxman


Director Of Photography

About

Birth Place
London, England, GB
Born
April 03, 1912

Biography

Entered films as a darkroom assistant at age 14, served with the Film Unit of the RAF during WWII and graduated to theatrical features with the RAF-produced "Journey Together" (1945).Waxman collaborated on such fine British films as "Brighton Rock" (1946) and "The Day the Earth Caught Fire" (1962) and also contributed to a number of American films during a career that spanned nearly four...

Biography

Entered films as a darkroom assistant at age 14, served with the Film Unit of the RAF during WWII and graduated to theatrical features with the RAF-produced "Journey Together" (1945).

Waxman collaborated on such fine British films as "Brighton Rock" (1946) and "The Day the Earth Caught Fire" (1962) and also contributed to a number of American films during a career that spanned nearly four decades.

Filmography

 

Cinematography (Feature Film)

The Uncanny (1977)
Cinematographer
A Bridge Too Far (1977)
Camera Operator
Journey Into Fear (1976)
Director Of Photography
The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976)
Director Of Photography
Vampyres (1974)
Cinematographer
Digby, the Biggest Dog in the World (1974)
Cinematographer
The Wicker Man (1974)
Cinematographer
Blue Blood (1973)
Director Of Photography
Endless Night (1972)
Director Of Photography
Flight of the Doves (1971)
Director of Photography
Cry of the Penguins (1971)
Cinematographer
There's a Girl in My Soup (1970)
Director of Photography
The Beast In The Cellar (1970)
Cinematographer
Twisted Nerve (1969)
Director of Photography
The Trygon Factor (1969)
Director of Photography
Danger Route (1968)
Director of Photography
The Anniversary (1968)
Director of Photography
The Family Way (1967)
Director of Photography
Khartoum (1966)
2nd unit Photographer
The Nanny (1965)
Director of Photography
She (1965)
Director of Photography
Go-Go Big Beat! (1965)
Photographer for "Mods and Rockers"
The Bargee (1964)
Cinematographer
Fury at Smuggler's Bay (1963)
Director of Photography
Stolen Hours (1963)
Director of Photography
Sword of Lancelot (1963)
Director of Photography
The Day the Earth Caught Fire (1962)
Director of Photography
I Thank a Fool (1962)
Director of Photography
Man in the Moon (1961)
Director of Photography
The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (1961)
Director of Photography
The Secret Partner (1961)
Director of Photography
Swiss Family Robinson (1960)
Director of Photography
Third Man on the Mountain (1959)
Director of Photography
Nor The Moon By Night (1959)
Director Of Photography
Sapphire (1959)
Director Of Photography
Innocent Sinners (1957)
Cinematographer
Robbery Under Arms (1957)
Director Of Photography
The Baby And The Battleship (1956)
Director Of Photography
The Hornet's Nest (1955)
Cinematographer
The Sleeping Tiger (1954)
Director of Photography
The Detective (1954)
Director Of Photography
The Lady and the Bandit (1951)
Scenes Photographer in England
Green Grow the Rushes (1951)
Director Of Photography
Waterfront (1950)
Director Of Photography
Brighton Rock (1947)
Director Of Photography
Journey Together (1945)
Cinematographer

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

Flash Gordon (1980)
Photography
The 39 Steps (1978)
Additional Photography

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976)
Dp/Cinematographer

Life Events

1945

First film as director of photography, "Journey Together"

Videos

Movie Clip

Pink Panther Strikes Again, The - Does Your Dog Bite? That's Graham Stark, pal of Peter Sellers and a regular in the series, as the "idiot" clerk at a Swiss hotel in a famous gag with "Inspector Clouseau," from The Pink Panther Strikes Again, 1976.
Pink Panther Strikes Again, The - 40 Winks Satisfied that man-servant Cato (Burt Kwouk) is not lurking, and unaware of Dreyfus (Herbert Lom) stalking from downstairs, Clouseau (Peter Sellers) settles in for a nap in The Pink Panther Strikes Again 1976.
Detective, The (1954) - A Forest Of Priests Summoned before the bishop (Cecil Parker) and policeman Wilkins (John Horsley), amateur sleuth Father Brown (Alec Guinness) is told of the plan to protect a valuable cross from theft, in The Detective 1954, based on the first of G.K. Chesterton's "Father Brown" stories.
Detective, The (1954) - Go Up And Look Toward The Sea Father Brown (Alec Guinness), who has taken it upon himself to transport a valuable old cross to Rome to prevent its' theft, boards the London train, casually meeting a handsome bearded priest (Peter Finch), early in The Detective, 1954, from a G.K. Chesterton story.
Detective, The (1954) - After Saint Ignatius Opening scene, introducing Alec Guinness in his only appearance as G.K. Chesterton's "Father Brown," from the best-known movie adaptation of the popular short stories, released in the the U.S. as The Detective, 1954, co-starring Peter Finch.
Flight Of The Doves (1971) - Always Going On About Ireland Opening introduces Jack Wild as Finn and Helen Raye as younger sister Derval, their idyll interrupted by their comical mean stepfather whom they call “Uncle” Toby (William Rushton), in director Ralph Nelson’s Flight Of The Doves, 1971, from the story by Walter Macken, co-starring Ron Moody.
Flight Of The Doves (1971) - If The Children Are Not Found Introduced in legal papers in the previous scene as the sole rival to the orphan kid heroes for their grandfather’s legacy, Ron Moody (known for playing Fagin in Oliver!, 1968), appears as night club actor “Hawk” Dove, doing a Jekyll & Hyde routine, early in Flight Of The Doves, 1971.
Flight Of The Doves (1971) - You Don't Have To Be Irish To Be Irish Just fanfare, Ralph Nelson directing, also credited with the lyric as Alph Elson, the music by composer Roy Budd, young stars Jack Wild and Helen Raye romping with local extras and bands, shooting at Phoenix Park in Dublin, in Flight Of The Doves, 1971.
Flight Of The Doves (1971) - We Might Have Made It Disguised now in opposite genders, English runaways Finn and Derval (Jack Wild, Helen Raye) have evaded capture again but think they’re done for and will never reach their Irish grandmother, when good fortune strikes, Dorothy McGuire greeting them, near the climax in Flight Of The Doves, 1971.
Flight Of The Doves (1971) - The Far Off Place English runaways Finn and Derval (Jack Wild, Helen Raye) captured by friendly Irish tinkers, Barry Keegan and as his daughter, Dana, the English-born Irish pop singer who had just won the Eurovision Song Contest, her song here by prodigy Roy Budd and Brendan O’Dbuil, in Flight Of The Doves, 1971.
I Thank A Fool (1962) - My Wife Is An Invalid De-certified doctor Christine (Susan Hayward), using a new name, after a prison term for mercy-killing, seeking a new line of work, is shocked to find the prospective employer who sought her out is Dane (Peter Finch), who prosecuted her, now seeking care for his wife (Diane Cilento) in I Thank A Fool, 1962.
I Thank A Fool (1962) - He Wanted Me To Under cross-ex by British prosecutor Dane (Peter Finch, in the wig), Canadian doctor Christine Allison (Susan Hayward) grows indignant as she doesn't quite admit to euthanizing her lover, in I Thank A Fool, 1962.

Trailer

Bibliography