William Bowers


Playwright, Screenwriter

About

Also Known As
William J. Bowers
Birth Place
Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA
Born
January 17, 1916
Died
March 27, 1987
Cause of Death
Respiratory Failure

Biography

Specialized in comedy westerns and also turned out several thrillers. Bowers produced the last film that he wrote, the superior Western parody "Support Your Local Sheriff!" (1969)....

Biography

Specialized in comedy westerns and also turned out several thrillers. Bowers produced the last film that he wrote, the superior Western parody "Support Your Local Sheriff!" (1969).

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

The Godfather Part II (1974)

Writer (Feature Film)

The Wild Wild West Revisited (1979)
Screenwriter
Kate Bliss and the Ticker Tape Kid (1978)
Screenplay
Sidekicks (1974)
Screenplay
The Gun and the Pulpit (1974)
Screenwriter
Support Your Local Sheriff! (1969)
Screenwriter
The Ride to Hangman's Tree (1967)
Screenwriter
Way ... Way Out (1966)
Screenwriter
Advance to the Rear (1964)
Screenwriter
The Last Time I Saw Archie (1961)
Screenwriter
-30- (1959)
Screenwriter
Alias Jesse James (1959)
Screenwriter
-30- (1959)
Screenplay
The Sheepman (1958)
Screenwriter
Imitation General (1958)
Screenwriter
The Law and Jake Wade (1958)
Screenwriter
My Man Godfrey (1957)
Screenwriter
The Best Things in Life Are Free (1956)
Screenwriter
5 Against the House (1955)
Screenwriter
Tight Spot (1955)
Screenwriter
She Couldn't Say No (1954)
Screenwriter
Split Second (1953)
Screenwriter
Cry Danger (1951)
Screenwriter
The Mob (1951)
Screenwriter
Mrs. O'Malley and Mr. Malone (1950)
Screenwriter
Convicted (1950)
Screenwriter
The Gunfighter (1950)
Screenwriter
The Gunfighter (1950)
Story
The Gal Who Took the West (1949)
Story and Screenplay
Abandoned (1949)
Additional Dialogue
The Countess of Monte Cristo (1948)
Screenwriter
River Lady (1948)
Screenwriter
Larceny (1948)
Screenwriter
Black Bart (1948)
Screenwriter
The Web (1947)
Screenwriter
Something in the Wind (1947)
Screenwriter
Ladies' Man (1947)
Story
Night and Day (1946)
Screenwriter
The Fabulous Suzanne (1946)
Original Story
The Notorious Lone Wolf (1946)
Story
Sing Your Way Home (1945)
Screenwriter
Higher and Higher (1943)
Additional Dialogue
The Adventures of a Rookie (1943)
Original story and Adapted
Seven Days' Leave (1942)
Original Screenplay
My Favorite Spy (1942)
Screenwriter

Producer (Feature Film)

Mobile Two (1975)
Producer
Support Your Local Sheriff! (1969)
Producer

Music (Feature Film)

-30- (1959)
Composer
-30- (1959)
Theme Lyrics

Writer (Special)

More Wild Wild West (1980)
From Story
More Wild Wild West (1980)
Writer

Special Thanks (Special)

More Wild Wild West (1980)
From Story
More Wild Wild West (1980)
Writer

Life Events

1942

First film credit as co-writer of "My Favorite Spy"

1969

Final film writing credit, also first film as producer, "Support Your Local Sheriff!"

Videos

Movie Clip

Seven Days' Leave (1942) - Can't Get Out Of This Mood Following complex machinations, G-I Johnny (Victor Mature) is about to confess to heiress Terry (Lucille Ball) that his romancing is motivated partly by a big inheritance, not realizing she’s way ahead of him, we cut to Ginny Simms with the Freddy Martin Orchestra, and another Jimmy McHugh/Frank Loesser tune, in RKO’s Seven Days’ Leave, 1942.
Advance To The Rear (1964) - The Whole Purpose Of This War Union Captain Heath (Glenn Ford) is upbraided by his superior, by-the-book career officer and General Brackenby (Melvyn Douglas), for rocking the boat by taking prisoners, when fighting ensues, and he has a further chat with his goofy Sergeant Davis (Alan Hale Jr.), early in the MGM Civil War comedy Advance To The Rear, 1964.
Advance To The Rear (1964) The War Won't Last Forever Briefly with Whit Bissell as Union Captain Queeg, Melvyn Douglas as Col. Brackenby and Glenn Ford as Lt. Heath, who’ve just been demoted together for screwing up and are being shipped west, meet Joan Blondell as Easy Jenny and Stella Stevens as dishy Martha Lou, whom we know to be a top Confederate spy, in the Civil War comedy Advance To The Rear, 1964.
-30- (1959) - Leaving Girls Around Closer to a love scene, or anything intimate or personal, than any producer, director and star Jack Webb (as editor Sam Gatlin) ever played on (TV’s) Dragnet(1951-1959), his young second wife Peggy (Whitney Blake) visits the newsroom, rain still falling, their topics hot then heavy, in the newspaper drama -30-, 1959.
-30- (1959) - The Woman's Angle Neurotic but determined newsroom writer Jan (Nancy Valentine) is baffled when her assault on night-shift editor Sam Gatlin (producer and director Jack Webb) succeeds, city editor Bathgate (Willian Conrad) concurring, in -30-, 1959.
-30- (1959) - Conditions That Prevail Opening scene, city editor Bathgate (William Conrad) toying with copy boy Collins (David Nelson, Ozzie and Harriet's son), veteran colleagues smirking, from director, producer and star Jack Webb's -30-, 1959tbd
Convicted (1950) - Murder Was Not Your Intent Glenn Ford as Joe who accidentally killed a big-shot’s son in a bar fight, gets sentenced as his lame employer-hired lawyer (Roland Winters) gets chewed out by the compassionate D-A Knowland (Broderick Crawford), Griff Barnett his sad father, Dorothy Malone, 13 years Crawford’s junior, as his daughter, Millard Mitchell the other convict on the train, in Convicted, 1950.
Convicted (1950) - They Call It Yammering Ex-D-A Knowland (Broderick Crawford) is unflappable on his first day as prison warden, ignoring head guard Douglas (Carl Benton Reid) and aide Mackay (Ed Begley), confronting his new charges including Tex (John Doucette) and Luigi (Peter Virgo), in Convicted, 1950, starring Glenn Ford.
Convicted (1950) - I Said Prosecute Not Persecute Glenn Ford as Joe, sent up for accidentally killing a guy in a bar fight, now in trouble for slugging a guard, with Broderick Crawford as Knowland, the D-A who prosecuted him, now warden of the prison, consoling him about his father’s death and introducing his fetching daughter-assistant (Dorothy Malone), in Convicted, 1950
Cry Danger (1951) - All The Big Shots From opening credits revealing nothing but trains, star Dick Powell emerges, we soon learn, from a stretch in prison, greeted by cop Gus (Regis Toomey) and alibi DeLong (Richard Erdman), in Cry Danger, 1951, directed by Robert Parrish, also starring Rhonda Fleming.
Cry Danger (1951) - Better Grab Me Quick Settling in at an LA trailer park, newly cleared convict Rocky (Dick Powell) with his landlord (Jay Adler) when we discover why he's there, Nancy (Rhonda Fleming), the wife of his still-jailed also-innocent friend, arriving, early in Cry Danger, 1951.
Cry Danger (1951) - I Want To See The Man Sprung from prison and working to free his also-framed buddy, Rocky (Dick Powell) meets a cigarette girl (Gloria Saunders), and pays a second visit to bookie Castro (William Conrad), who gave him a race tip instead of the loot he denies ever having had, in Cry Danger, 1951.

Trailer

Seven Days' Leave - (Original Trailer) A G.I. (Victor Mature) must marry an heiress (Lucille Ball) whom he's never met to get $100,000, all in a Seven Days' Leave (1942).
Night and Day - (Original Trailer) Fanciful biography of songwriter Cole Porter (Cary Grant), who rose from high society to find success on Tin Pan Alley.
Gunfighter, The - (Re-issue Trailer) The fastest gun in the West (Gregory Peck) tries to escape his reputation in The Gunfighter (1950).
Assignment - Paris - (Original Trailer) Dana Andrews is a foreign correspondent searching for leads in Communist Hungary in Assignment - Paris (1952).
Advance To The Rear - (Original Trailer) Civil War rejects are sent to the West, supposedly out of harm's way in Advance To The Rear (1964) starring Glenn Ford and Stella Stevens.
Sing Your Way Home - (Original Trailer) A war correspondent (Jack Haley) assembles young European entertainers to put on a show for the troops in Sing Your Way Home (1945) directed by Anthony Mann.
5 Against the House - (Original Trailer) Four college buddies plot to rob a Reno casino in 5 Against the House (1955).
Split Second - (Original Trailer) Escaping convicts hold hostages in a ghost town, not realizing it's an A-bomb site in Split Second (1953).
She Couldn't Say No (1954) - (Original Trailer) An heiress decides to pass out anonymous gifts in a small town in She Couldn't Say No (1954), starring Jean Simmons and Robert Mitchum.
Mrs. O'Malley And Mr. Malone - (Original Trailer) A lawyer and a widow encounter murder on a train in Mrs. O'Malley and Mr. Malone (1950) starring James Whitmore and Marjorie Main.
Cry Danger - (Re-release Trailer) Innocent ex-con Dick Powell sets out to find the real criminals in Cry Danger (1951).
Mob, The - (Original Trailer) Police detective Broderick Crawford fakes a suspension so he can go undercover in The Mob (1951).

Bibliography