Tom Tryon


Actor
Tom Tryon

About

Also Known As
Thomas Tryon
Birth Place
Hartford, Connecticut, USA
Born
January 14, 1926
Died
September 04, 1991
Cause of Death
Stomach Cancer

Biography

Tall, ruggedly handsome leading man of the 1950s and 60s who after a 16-year career gave up acting in 1971 to write the best-selling novels "Crowned Heads" and "Harvest Home." After beginning in a stock theatre company as a set painter and assistant manager, and later becoming a production assistant with NBC-TV, the Yale-educated Tryon entered film in 1955 with "Scarlet Hour." He appeare...

Family & Companions

Ann Noyes
Wife
Married in June 1955; divorced in 1958.

Bibliography

"By the Rivers of Babylon"
Tom Tryon (1992)
"The Adventures of Opal and Cupid"
Tom Tryon (1992)
"The Wings of the Morning"
Tom Tryon (1990)
"All That Glitters"
Tom Tryon, Alfred A. Knopf (1986)

Notes

"When I began writing all that I had going for me was that I could type 80 words per minute, I could spell and I liked words. But in doing it, I found that the real reward was the writing itself, working at it day by day and finally accomplishing something--that was it. To have a book published is one of the most exciting things that can happen to you. Infinitely more rewarding than acting." --Thomas Tryon, quoted in his obituary in The New York Times, September 5, 1991.

Among his ancestors was William Tryon, a Tory who was Governor of New York before and during the American Revolution.

Biography

Tall, ruggedly handsome leading man of the 1950s and 60s who after a 16-year career gave up acting in 1971 to write the best-selling novels "Crowned Heads" and "Harvest Home." After beginning in a stock theatre company as a set painter and assistant manager, and later becoming a production assistant with NBC-TV, the Yale-educated Tryon entered film in 1955 with "Scarlet Hour." He appeared in mostly forgettable fare including "I Married a Monster from Outer Space" (1958) (as a stone-faced alien), and as the title character in the 1958 Walt Disney TV series "Texas John Slaughter." The height of his acting career was the starring role in Otto Preminger's "The Cardinal" (1963). In 1971, Tryon wrote the highly popular, supernatural thriller "The Other," which he adapted to the screen the following year, and then switched full time to his eventually more successful writing career. His novel "Harvest Home" was made into a 1978 TV movie "The Dark Secret of Harvest Home," and his "Crowned Heads" was adapted in part for the 1978 Billy Wilder film, "Fedora."

Life Events

1943

Enlisted in the US Navy at age 17 and spent three years as a radio specialist in the South Pacific during WWII

1952

Broadway debut as understudy in the musical, "Wish You Were Here"

1955

TV acting debut, "The Way of the World"

1955

Film debut, "Scarlet Hour"

1955

Moved to California

1958

Appeared in title role of Walt Disney TV series, "Texas John Slaughter"

1962

Cast opposite Marilyn Monroe in the never-completed film, "Something's Got to Give"

1971

Acted in final film, "The Nacro Men"

1971

First novel published, "The Other"

1972

Began writing full time

1972

Wrote first screenplay, adapting the "The Other"

1978

Novel, "Crowned Heads" adapted in part as Billy Wilder film, "Fedora"

Videos

Movie Clip

In Harm's Way - Twelve Bat Blind Ships Pearl Harbor, December 7th, 1941, one admiral (Franchot Tone) overrules another (Dana Andrews), orders conveyed to Capt. Torrey (John Wayne) and Cmdr. Eddington (Kirk Douglass), at sea, Carroll O'Connor supporting, in Otto Preminger's In Harm's Way, 1965.
I Married A Monster From Outer Space - Marge Follows Bill Troubled Marge (Gloria Talbott) follows husband Bill (Tom Tryon) on one of his evening strolls, where by special effects she becomes convinced he has changed, in I Married A Monster From Outer Space, 1958.
I Married A Monster From Outer Space - Breeding Purposes Marge (Gloria Talbott) in a pivotal conversation with husband Bill (Tom Tryon), leading him to concede that he's an alien and his cohorts aim to mate with human females in I Married A Monster From Outer Space, 1958.
I Married A Monster From Outer Space - Opening Credits Opening title credits for director Gene Fowler Jr.'s forthright I Married A Monster From Outer Space, 1958, starring Tom Tryon and Gloria Talbott.
I Married A Monster From Outer Space - Honeymoon Efforts by Marge (Gloria Talbott) notwithstanding, Bill (Tom Tryon) seems not to get the point of the honeymoon, for reasons that become apparent under lightning, in I Married A Monster From Outer Space, 1958.
I Married A Monster From Outer Space - Got the Time? Valerie Allen plays a doomed working girl as Bill (Tom Tryon) and fellow under-cover aliens (Alan Dexter, Robert Ivers) tangle with barkeep Grady (Maxie Rosenbloom) in I Married A Monster From Outer Space, 1958.
I Married A Monster From Outer Space - Bachelor Party Bill (Tom Tryon) leaves buddies (Peter Baldwin, Alan Dexter, Robert Ivers) at his bachelor party then has something more than a traffic accident in an early sequence from I Married A Monster From Outer Space, 1958.

Trailer

Family

Arthur Lane Tryon
Father
Haberdasher.
Elizabeth Tryon
Mother
A Lane Tryon
Brother
William Tryon
Brother

Companions

Ann Noyes
Wife
Married in June 1955; divorced in 1958.

Bibliography

"By the Rivers of Babylon"
Tom Tryon (1992)
"The Adventures of Opal and Cupid"
Tom Tryon (1992)
"The Wings of the Morning"
Tom Tryon (1990)
"All That Glitters"
Tom Tryon, Alfred A. Knopf (1986)
"Crowned Heads"
Tom Tryon, Alfred A. Knopf (1976)
"Lady"
Tom Tryon, Alfred A. Knopf (1974)
"Harvest Home"
Tom Tryon, Alfred A. Knopf (1973)
"The Other"
Tom Tryon, Alfred A. Knopf (1971)
"The Night of the Moonbow"
Tom Tryon

Notes

"When I began writing all that I had going for me was that I could type 80 words per minute, I could spell and I liked words. But in doing it, I found that the real reward was the writing itself, working at it day by day and finally accomplishing something--that was it. To have a book published is one of the most exciting things that can happen to you. Infinitely more rewarding than acting." --Thomas Tryon, quoted in his obituary in The New York Times, September 5, 1991.

Among his ancestors was William Tryon, a Tory who was Governor of New York before and during the American Revolution.

Awarded the Prix Femina de Belgique (1964)