Gene Towne


Biography

During his Hollywood career, Gene Towne wrote a variety of screenplays. Towne's film career started with such writing credits as "Loose Ankles" (1930), "Strictly Modern" (1930) and "Goldie" (1931). He also appeared in "Business and Pleasure" (1932) with Will Rogers, "I Love That Man" (1933) and "Song of the Eagle" (1933). In the latter half of his career, Towne wrote the comedy "S...

Biography

During his Hollywood career, Gene Towne wrote a variety of screenplays. Towne's film career started with such writing credits as "Loose Ankles" (1930), "Strictly Modern" (1930) and "Goldie" (1931). He also appeared in "Business and Pleasure" (1932) with Will Rogers, "I Love That Man" (1933) and "Song of the Eagle" (1933). In the latter half of his career, Towne wrote the comedy "Stand-In" (1937) with Leslie Howard, the Henry Fonda crime flick "You Only Live Once" (1937) and the Irene Dunne musical comedy "Joy of Living" (1938). He also appeared in the romance "Eternally Yours" (1939) with Loretta Young. Towne last wrote the Phil Silvers comedy adaptation "Top Banana" (1954). Towne passed away in March 1979 at the age of 75.

Filmography

 

Writer (Feature Film)

Top Banana (1954)
Screen version by
Swiss Family Robinson (1940)
Screenwriter
Tom Brown's School Days (1940)
Adapted and Screenplay
Eternally Yours (1939)
Original Screenplay
Joy of Living (1938)
Screenwriter
History Is Made at Night (1937)
Screenwriter
Stand-In (1937)
Screenwriter
You Only Live Once (1937)
Screenwriter
Ali Baba Goes to Town (1937)
Story
The Case Against Mrs. Ames (1936)
Screenwriter
Professional Soldier (1936)
Contract Writer
Mary Burns, Fugitive (1935)
Original Screenplay
Every Night at Eight (1935)
Screenwriter
Shanghai (1935)
Original Screenplay
The Girl Friend (1935)
Story
She Couldn't Take It (1935)
Story
Grand Exit (1935)
Story
This Is the Life (1935)
Story
The Personality Kid (1934)
Story
Song of the Eagle (1933)
Original Story
The Billion Dollar Scandal (1933)
Original story and Screenplay
Broadway Thru a Keyhole (1933)
Screenwriter
I Love That Man (1933)
Story and Screenplay
Business and Pleasure (1932)
Adaptation
Goldie (1931)
Adapted and dial
Good Sport (1931)
Original Story
Loose Ankles (1930)
Scen
The Czar of Broadway (1930)
Story
Strictly Modern (1930)
Scen
Loose Ankles (1930)
Dial
The Czar of Broadway (1930)
Cont
Strictly Modern (1930)
Story
The Czar of Broadway (1930)
Dial
Strictly Modern (1930)
Dial
Flying Romeos (1928)
Titles
Ladies' Night in a Turkish Bath (1928)
Adaptation
The Butter and Egg Man (1928)
Titles
Waterfront (1928)
Titles
Do Your Duty (1928)
Titles
Lady Be Good (1928)
Titles
Outcast (1928)
Titles
The Life of Riley (1927)
Titles

Producer (Feature Film)

Little Men (1941)
Producer
Little Men (1941)
Presented By
Swiss Family Robinson (1940)
Presented By
Tom Brown's School Days (1940)
Producer
Swiss Family Robinson (1940)
Producer

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Mary Burns, Fugitive (1935) — (Movie Clip) A Nice Gal Like You Dramatic prison intake sequence, accomplished shots and montage directed by William K. Howard, as title character Sylvia Sidney enters and meets cellmate Goldie (Pert Kelton), in Mary Burns, Fugitive, 1935, from Paramount and producer Walter Wanger, also starring Alan Baxter and Melvyn Douglas.
Loose Ankles (1930) - Two Wallas An especially buoyant opening, original song by Jack Meskill and Pete Wendling, Loretta Young and Inez Courtney as insouciant cousins Ann and Betty, various relatives gathering for the reading of a will, Otis Harlan as "The Major" presiding, in the early talkie Loose Ankles, 1930.
Loose Ankles (1930) - You Don't Mind Being Compromised? Timid Gil (Douglas Fairbanks Jr.) has answered an ad from wealthy Ann (Loretta Young) for an "unscrupulous" man, as she tries to stop her too-rich family from getting another inheritance by causing a public scandal, her maid (Daphne Pollard) helping, in Loose Ankles, 1930.
History Is Made At Night (1937) - Don't Struggle First appearance of Charles Boyer, no indication of who he might be, but in the next hotel room he overhears Irene (Jean Arthur) being threatened by her chauffeur (Ivan Lebedeff), hired by her husband (Colin Clive) to incriminate her, early in Frank Borzage's History Is Made At Night, 1937.
History Is Made At Night (1937) - More Dead Than The Male The day after his evening with Jean Arthur, we learn Charles Boyer (as "Paul") is headwaiter at the Paris restaurant where he entertained her, with chef Cesare (Leo Carrillo), diner Norton (George Meeker) and a timid waiter (Barlowe Borland), in Frank Borzage's History Is Made At Night, 1937.
History Is Made At Night (1937) - You'd Let Him Die? Irene (Jean Arthur) home from a Paris night out with a new beau, has forgotten he saved her by posing as a jewel thief, confronted by her villainous tycoon husband (Colin Clive) and a detective (Georges Renavent), in Frank Borzage's History Is Made At Night, 1937.
History Is Made At Night (1937) - I Hate Men Don't You? Director Frank Borzage's Byzantine plot has Paul (Charles Boyer) who, it seems, is a light-hearted jewel thief in full command of a Paris restaurant staff, entertaining Irene (Jean Arthur), whom he rescued from a husband determined to frame her, in History Is Made At Night, 1937.
Tom Brown's School Days (1940) - Story Of Rugby Prologue, then East (Freddie Bartholomew) joins Tom (Jimmy Lydon), and they together join a flashback regarding their beloved schoolmaster Dr. Arnold (Cedric Hardwicke), also his wife (Josephine Hutchinson), in the 1940 RKO version of Tom Brown's School Days.
Tom Brown's School Days (1940) - Shabby, Isn't It? New boy Tom (Jimmy Lydon) arrives at Rugby School, met by East (Freddie Bartholomew) and pals (Charles Smith, Dick Chandlee) and chef Sally (Polly Moran), then getting in trouble with "Old Grimey" (Barlowe Borland), in Tom Brown's School Days, 1940.
Stand-In (1937) - You're Smart But You're Young Introduction of finance whiz Atterbury Dodd (Leslie Howard), interrupted by Junior (J.C. Nugent), who informs him that his grandfather (Tully Marshall) has decided to sell the movie studio his company owns, in Stand-In, 1937.
Stand-In (1937) - Genius Of Colossal Exposition at the Hollywood studio where the star (Leslie Howard) is about to take over, C. Henry Gordon the scheming executive, Humphrey Bogart the beleaguered producer, Marla Shelton the fading star, Alan Mowbray her director, in early in Stand-In, 1937.
Stand-In (1937) - Cogs In The Machine Jaded producer Quintain (Humphrey Bogart) is recruited to give New York efficiency expert Dodd (Leslie Howard) a look around the movie studio, his acquaintance Lester (Joan Blondell), a stand-in, and the PR man (Jack Carson) popping up, in producer Walter Wanger's Stand-In, 1937.

Bibliography