Jule Styne


Composer

About

Also Known As
Julius Kerwin Stein, Jules Styne
Birth Place
London, England, GB
Born
December 31, 1905
Died
September 20, 1994
Cause of Death
Heart Failure

Biography

Brilliant, prolific tunesmith who, over the course of a nearly 75-year long career, composed 2000 songs, published 1500 of them and had somewhere around 200 of them become enormous hits or later song standards.Jule (pronounced JOO-lee) Styne was playing solo piano with the Chicago Symphony at age eight, worked during the Jazz Age in bands which also featured the up-and-coming likes of Be...

Family & Companions

Ethel Rubinstein
Wife
Married on August 9, 1926; divorced in 1951; originally from Chicago.
Margaret Ann Bissett Brown
Wife
Actor, model. Married on June 4, 1962; born in England; survived him.

Bibliography

"Jule: The Story of Composer Jule Styne"
Theodore Taylor (1979)

Notes

Co-produced, with Sammy Cahn, the revival of "Pal Joey" which won the New York Film Drama Critics Circle Award in 1951/52

In 1959 Styne received the following tribute, which was read aloud and entered into the Congressional Record: "The lives of Americans throughout our land as well as the lives of the people throughout the corners of the world have been enriched by the artistry and genius of Jule Styne."

Biography

Brilliant, prolific tunesmith who, over the course of a nearly 75-year long career, composed 2000 songs, published 1500 of them and had somewhere around 200 of them become enormous hits or later song standards.

Jule (pronounced JOO-lee) Styne was playing solo piano with the Chicago Symphony at age eight, worked during the Jazz Age in bands which also featured the up-and-coming likes of Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller and Charlie Spivak, and entered films in the 1930s as an arranger and vocal coach for Alice Faye and Shirley Temple at 20th Century-Fox. Styne next worked for Republic Pictures on melodies for various B musicals, and in the early 40s began his famous, though never exclusive, partnership with lyricist Sammy Cahn. Some of Styne and Cahn's biggest hits during the 40s and 50s were sumptuous romantic ballads, many of which Frank Sinatra helped propel to the top of the weekly Hit Parade. One example was the lovely "I Fall in Love Too Easily" from the film "Anchors Aweigh" (1945), while another, the lush title song from the feature "Three Coins in the Fountain," also won an Oscar as Best Song in 1954.

The early Styne songs, full of wartime longing and nostalgia, often seem atypically softer and gentler than his later sharp, showbizzy Broadway anthems like "Everything's Coming Up Roses" and "Let Me Entertain You" from "Gypsy" (1959), or "Don't Rain on My Parade" from "Funny Girl" (1964). Even a later ballad like "People" (from "Funny Girl"), which became a song standard for Barbra Streisand, has more brass than, say, "It's Magic," a rich number from the film "Romance on the High Seas" (1948) which became another signature tune for an equally feisty song stylist, Doris Day. Still, the sense of rhythmic and melodic flow remained a constant, as did the craftsmanship of a song's syncopation and drive as well as the sensitivity to lyrics and emotion. If Styne often did not have the star clout on Broadway in the 50s that Jerome Kern, Irving Berlin and Cole Porter did a generation earlier, it was partly because, as he himself realized, "I am the greatest collaborator there is," often letting a show's star or a musical's lyricist set much of the tone for his work.

Although Styne wrote a number of classic songs especially for film, including "(It Seems to Me) I've Heard That Song Before" from "Youth on Parade" (1942) and "I'll Walk Alone" from "Tonight and Every Night" (1945) and lent his talent for infectious, buoyant melodies to such film scores as "Anchors Aweigh" (1945), "The Kid From Brooklyn" (1946) and "It Happened in Brooklyn" (1947), he preferred writing for the stage. He first took a crack at writing a full Broadway score with "High Button Shoes" (1947)--the result, with choreography by Jerome Robbins, was a Broadway landmark. His encore triumph came in collaboration with snappy, witty lyricist Leo Robin, "Gentleman Prefer Blondes" (1949), which gave Carol Channing an enduring theme song with the delicious "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend."

Styne would collaborate with Robin on the bright score for the Betty Grable film "Meet Me After the Show" (1951) and the less successful feature remake "My Sister Eileen" (1955) and would create tunes with Cahn for "The West Point Story" (1950), but around mid-decade he firmly decided to commit his songwriting energies to Broadway rather than to film. His work with Cahn came to an end as a result, but a recurring collaboration with the playful, inventive duo of Betty Comden and Adolph Green began with a revue "Two on the Aisle" (1951) and would later include the charming "Bells Are Ringing" (1956). Through the late 60s, Styne's genius for writing slam-bang Broadway hits for strong leading women came to the fore; one not only links Channing with "Gentleman" and Streisand with "Funny Girl" but also Judy Holliday with "Bells," Mary Martin with "Peter Pan" (1954, featuring the famous "Never Never Land") and Ethel Merman with "Gypsy" (1959, which includes the powerhouse anthem "Rose's Turn").

Although Styne always felt he had more creative freedom on Broadway, most of his major musicals were eventually adapted for the big screen. Beginning in 1957 with a musicalization of "Ruggles of Red Gap" he also began writing (and later producing) TV musical programs as well. The 60s had its leaner moments ("Do Re Mi," "Subways Are for Sleeping," both 1960 Broadway shows) but, besides "Funny Girl," this era also saw Styne finally win Tony Awards for his high energy "Hallelujah, Baby!" (1967). He continued with shows like "Sugar" (1972) and "Lorelei" (1974) and created tunes for the Broadway musical rendition of "The Red Shoes" (1993) less than two years before he died.

A stocky, feisty man much loved in showbiz circles for his sputtered, incomplete sentences, his wit, adaptability and showmanship, Styne was a lively interview subject and sometime performer up until the end. The creator of songs ranging from the joyous "Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!" and "Make Someone Happy" to the heartbreaking melancholy of "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry" to the triumph of "Just in Time" received many deserved honors before his death at age 88.

Filmography

 

Music (Feature Film)

Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) (2020)
Song
Playing with Fire (2019)
Song
The Incredibles 2 (2018)
Song
Captain America: Civil War (2016)
Song
Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)
Song
The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)
Song
Jack and Jill (2011)
Song
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011)
Song
Mr. Popper's Penguins (2011)
Song
Arthur Christmas (2011)
Song
Burlesque (2010)
Song
Julie & Julia (2009)
Song
Forgetting Sarah Marshall (2008)
Song
College Road Trip (2008)
Song
Sex and the City (2008)
Song
Evening (2007)
Song
Fred Claus (2007)
Song
Flags of Our Fathers (2006)
Song
Unaccompanied Minors (2006)
Song
The Family Stone (2005)
Song
Connie and Carla (2004)
Song
Bad Santa (2003)
Song
Under the Tuscan Sun (2003)
Song ("Saturday Night (Is The Loneliest Night Of The Week)")
Dummy (2002)
Music
Moulin Rouge! (2001)
Composer
Sweet November (2001)
Song
Town & Country (2001)
Song
The Wedding Planner (2001)
Song ("The Closer You Are")
Spy Game (2001)
Song ("Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow")
Hanging Up (2000)
Song
Small Time Crooks (2000)
Song
The Family Man (2000)
Song
Reindeer Games (2000)
Song
Drop Dead Gorgeous (1999)
Song
Mickey Blue Eyes (1999)
Song
American Beauty (1999)
Song
The Story of Us (1999)
Song
The Sixth Sense (1999)
Song ("I Fall In Love Too Easily")
Blast from the Past (1999)
Song ("It'S Been A Long, Long Time")
Superstar (1999)
Song
Home Alone 3 (1997)
Song
In & Out (1997)
Song
A Simple Wish (1997)
Song
The Long Kiss Goodnight (1996)
Song
While You Were Sleeping (1995)
Song ("Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow")
Gypsy (1993)
Music
Sleepless In Seattle (1993)
Song
Calendar Girl (1993)
Song
Life with Mikey (1993)
Song
School Ties (1992)
Song
For the Boys (1991)
Song
29th Street (1991)
Song
The Fisher King (1991)
Song
Coins In The Fountain (1990)
Song
The Fabulous Baker Boys (1989)
Song
Die Hard (1988)
Song
License to Drive (1988)
Song
Planes, Trains and Automobiles (1987)
Song
Rhosyn a Rhith (1987)
Song ("Everything'S Coming Up Roses")
Radio Days (1987)
Song
Hannah and Her Sisters (1986)
Song
Porky's II: The Next Day (1983)
Music
Shifshuf Naim (1981)
Music ("Three Coins In The Fountain")
Roar (1981)
Music ("It'S Been A Long Long Time")
Marilyn: The Untold Story (1980)
Theme Lyrics
Airplane! (1980)
Song
Blue Sunshine (1979)
Song
Thieves (1977)
Music
Farewell, My Lovely (1975)
Song
The Steagle (1971)
Composer
Going Home (1971)
Composer
Mr. Magoo's Holiday Festival (1970)
Composer
Funny Girl (1968)
Composer
The Cool Ones (1967)
Composer
What a Way To Go! (1964)
Composer
Gypsy (1962)
Composer
Bells Are Ringing (1960)
Composer
My Sister Eileen (1955)
Composer
How To Be Very, Very Popular (1955)
Composer
Three Coins in the Fountain (1954)
Composer
Living It Up (1954)
Composer
Cruisin' Down the River (1953)
Composer
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)
Composer
With a Song in My Heart (1952)
Composer
Macao (1952)
Composer
Meet Me After the Show (1951)
Composer
Two Tickets to Broadway (1951)
Composer
The Dakota Kid (1951)
Composer
Double Dynamite (1951)
Composer
Purple Heart Diary (1951)
Composer
Starlift (1951)
Composer
I'll Get By (1950)
Composer
The West Point Story (1950)
Composer
Dark City (1950)
Composer
It's a Great Feeling (1949)
Composer
The Golden Stallion (1949)
Composer
Malaya (1949)
Composer
Killer Diller (1948)
Composer
Glamour Girl (1948)
Composer
The Miracle of the Bells (1948)
Composer
Romance on the High Seas (1948)
Composer
Two Guys from Texas (1948)
Composer
Miss Tatlock's Millions (1948)
Composer
Ladies' Man (1947)
Composer
It Happened in Brooklyn (1947)
Composer
Cinderella Jones (1946)
Composer
Sing While You Dance (1946)
Composer
The Falcon's Alibi (1946)
Composer
The Kid from Brooklyn (1946)
Composer
The Gentleman Misbehaves (1946)
Composer
Sweetheart of Sigma Chi (1946)
Composer
Tars and Spars (1946)
Composer
Tell It to a Star (1945)
Composer
The Great Morgan (1945)
Composer
Behind City Lights (1945)
Composer
Blonde from Brooklyn (1945)
Composer
I Love a Bandleader (1945)
Composer
The Tiger Woman (1945)
Composer
Tonight and Every Night (1945)
Composer
Anchors Aweigh (1945)
Composer
The Fatal Witness (1945)
Composer
The Stork Club (1945)
Composer
Jam Session (1944)
Composer
Follow the Boys (1944)
Composer
The Yellow Rose of Texas (1944)
Composer
Janie (1944)
Composer
Carolina Blues (1944)
Composer
Rosie, the Riveter (1944)
Composer
You Can't Ration Love (1944)
Composer
Casanova in Burlesque (1944)
Composer
Knickerbocker Holiday (1944)
Composer
Step Lively (1944)
Composer
O, My Darling Clementine (1943)
Composer
Here Comes Elmer (1943)
Composer
Hit Parade of 1943 (1943)
Composer
The Powers Girl (1943)
Composer
Salute for Three (1943)
Composer
Shantytown (1943)
Composer
Tahiti Honey (1943)
Composer
Thumbs Up (1943)
Composer
The Heat's On (1943)
Composer
Swing Your Partner (1943)
Composer
Henry Aldrich Swings It (1943)
Composer
Let's Face It (1943)
Composer
Larceny with Music (1943)
Composer
Pistol Packin' Mama (1943)
Composer
Heart of the Rio Grande (1942)
Composer
Ridin' Down the Canyon (1942)
Composer
Sleepytime Gal (1942)
Composer
Ice-Capades Revue (1942)
Composer
Lady for a Night (1942)
Composer
Youth on Parade (1942)
Composer
Johnny Doughboy (1942)
Composer
Hi, Neighbor (1942)
Composer
Beyond the Blue Horizon (1942)
Composer
Call of the Canyon (1942)
Composer
Cowboy Serenade (1942)
Composer
The Old Homestead (1942)
Composer
Priorities on Parade (1942)
Composer
Sweater Girl (1942)
Composer
Back in the Saddle (1941)
Composer
Sis Hopkins (1941)
Composer
Nevada City (1941)
Composer
Puddin' Head (1941)
Composer
Rags to Riches (1941)
Composer
Sailors on Leave (1941)
Composer
Sheriff of Tombstone (1941)
Composer
Angels with Broken Wings (1941)
Composer
Doctors Don't Tell (1941)
Composer
Gauchos of Eldorado (1941)
Composer
In Old Cheyenne (1941)
Composer
Lady from Louisiana (1941)
Composer
The Singing Hill (1941)
Composer
Ridin' on a Rainbow (1941)
Composer
You're the One (1941)
Composer
Bad Man of Deadwood (1941)
Composer
Mountain Moonlight (1941)
Composer
Ice-Capades (1941)
Composer
New York Town (1941)
Composer
Rookies on Parade (1941)
Composer
Under Fiesta Stars (1941)
Composer
Down Mexico Way (1941)
Composer
Gangs of Sonora (1941)
Composer
Pals of the Pecos (1941)
Composer
Dancing on a Dime (1940)
Vocal Arrangements
Barnyard Follies (1940)
Composer
Melody Ranch (1940)
Composer
Girl from Havana (1940)
Composer
Sing, Dance, Plenty Hot (1940)
Composer
Hit Parade of 1941 (1940)
Composer
The House Across the Bay (1940)
Composer
Melody and Moonlight (1940)
Composer
Tail Spin (1939)
Vocal work
Pack Up Your Troubles (1939)
Composer
Stop--Look and Love (1939)
Composer
Sally, Irene and Mary (1938)
Vocal Supervisor
Kentucky Moonshine (1938)
Vocal Supervisor and Music Arrangements
In Old Chicago (1938)
Vocal Supervisor
Josette (1938)
Vocal Supervisor
Happy Landing (1938)
Vocal Supervisor
Straight Place and Show (1938)
Composer
Hold That Co-Ed (1938)
Composer
Thin Ice (1937)
Vocal Supervisor
Love and Hisses (1937)
Vocal Supervisor
This Is My Affair (1937)
Vocal Supervisor
Life Begins in College (1937)
Vocal Supervisor
You Can't Have Everything (1937)
Vocal Supervisor
Wake Up and Live (1937)
Vocal Supervisor
Rootin' Tootin' Rhythm (1937)
Composer

Cast (Special)

The Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts (1990)
Broadway Sings: The Music of Jule Styne (1987)

Producer (Special)

Panama Hattie (1954)
Producer

Music (Special)

The AMC Project: Gay Hollywood (2003)
Song
Diamonds! (2000)
Song ("Diamonds Are A Girls Best Friend")
Jane Russell (1997)
Music
Where Have You Gone, Joe DiMaggio? (1997)
Song
A Grand Night For Singing - Public Television's Gift to You (1996)
Music
Michael Feinstein & Friends (1991)
Song
Night of 100 Stars III (1990)
Song
Night of 100 Stars III (1990)
Song Performer
The Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts (1990)
Song
Harry Connick, Jr. & His Orchestra: Swinging Out With Harry (1990)
Song
Tony Bennett (1988)
Song
Broadway Sings: The Music of Jule Styne (1987)
Song ("Let Me Entertain You" "Sunday" "I Guess I'Ll Hang My Tears Out To Dry" "I Don'T Want To Walk Without You" "I'Ve Heard That Song Before" "People" "I'Ts Been A Long, Long Time" "Long Before I Knew You" "Five Minutes More" "I'Ll Walk Alone" "I Fall In Love Too Easily" "Just In Time" "Time After Time" "Captain Hook'S Waltz" "It'S A Perfect Relationship" "Little Girl From Little Rock" "Some People" "All I Need Is The Girl" "Funny Girl" "Music That Makes Me Dance")
Brooklyn Bridge (1982)
Theme Lyrics
Baryshnikov on Broadway (1980)
Song
Ruggles of Red Gap (1957)
Songs
High Button Shoes (1956)
Music

Music (TV Mini-Series)

Peter Pan Starring Cathy Rigby (2000)
Music
Mister Magoo's Christmas Carol (1962)
Songs

Life Events

1909

Went with family at age three to see legendary Scottish music hall entertainer Harry Lauder; surprised audience when he jumped up on stage and started singing a song (date approximate)

1912

Emigrated to the U.S. From London's East End with his family at age six

1914

Child prodigy who performed as piano soloist with Chicago Symphony at age eight; also performed with the St. Louis and Detroit symphonies before the age of ten

1922

Commissioned by teenaged Mike Todd to write first song, "The Moth and the Flame", at age 16 for a musical act Todd was putting together (date approximate)

1924

Graduated from high school and began playing piano with Edgar Benson's orchestra (date approximate)

1926

Composed a song, "Sunday", supposedly to impress a young woman, which went on to become his first hit

1931

Organized and led own band

1936

Moved to New York and got a job as conductor and vocal coach for Broadway singing star Harry Richman (date approximate)

1937

Went to Hollywood to work at 20th Century-Fox as music arranger and vocal coach for Alice Faye and Shirley Temple

1938

Collaborated on first film score, "Hold That Co-Ed"

1942

Began collaboration with lyricist Sammy Cahn (date approximate)

1942

Received first of eight Oscar nominations for Best Song, "It Seems I Heard That Song Before", from the Republic picture, "Youth on Parade"; song's lyrics written by Sammy Cahn

1944

Wrote first music for Broadway, contributing material to "Glad to See You"

1947

First Broadway musical, the landmark, "High Button Shoes", with lyrics by Cahn and choreography by Jerome Robbins

1949

Teamed up with lyricist Leo Robin for the successful Broadway musical, "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes"

1950

Debut as Broadway producer, "Make a Wish"

1951

First collaboration with lyricist-librettists Betty Comden and Adolph Green, "Two on the Aisle", a revue starring Dolores Gray and Bert Lahr

1953

Wrote the music for the Broadway musical, "Hazel Flagg"

1954

Added songs (in collaboration with Betty Comden and Adolph Green) to the successful Broadway musical, "Peter Pan", shortly before its opening

1954

Debut as TV producer, "Anything Goes"

1955

Composed songs for last original movie musicals, "How to Be Very, Very Popular" and "My Sister Eileen"; Styne's movie musicals hereafter would be adaptations of his Broadway successes

1956

Collaborated again with Comden and Green on the Broadway musical, "Bells Are Ringing"

1956

End of collaboration with lyricst Sammy Cahn, who went on to team up with composer James Van Heusen

1957

Composed first TV score, "Ruggles of Red Gap"

1957

Debut as TV producer, "Anything Goes"

1958

Wrote music for the Broadway musical, "Say, Darling"

1959

Collaborated once with Stephen Sondheim, who wrote the lyrics to Styne's music for the Broadway musical, "Gypsy"

1960

Had two less-than-successful Broadway shows, "Do Re Mi" and "Subways Are for Sleeping"

1962

Co-founded On Stage Productions (with Lester Osterman)

1964

Enjoyed another major Broadway hit with "Funny Girl"; also had another musical, "Fade Out, Fade In", which played a very respectable nine months

1967

Opened 18th Broadway musical, "Hallelujah, Baby!"

1968

Wrote music for Broadway show, "Darling of the Day"

1970

Wrote songs for Broadway musical, "Look to the Lillies"

1972

Wrote music for Broadway musical comedy, "Sugar"

1974

Wrote songs for Broadway show, "Lorelei"

1980

Wrote music for Broadway show, "One Night Stand"

1987

Received tribute at Broadway's St. James Theatre; broadcast on PBS as an installment of "Great Performances" called "Broadway Sings: The Music of Jule Styne"

1990

Performed his song, "Two Little Girls from Little Rock", written for "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes", alongside Carol Channing at the benefit show, "Night of 100 Stars III", staged at Radio City Music Hall

1993

Final Broadway show, "The Red Shoes", a musicalized revamp of the famous 1948 British film directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger; Styne wrote much, though not all, of the music; show closed shortly after opening

1994

Only weeks before his death, revised the score of "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" by including a new song, "A Ride on a Rainbow", for a revival to be staged at the Goodspeed Opera in East Haddam, CT

Videos

Movie Clip

Gypsy (1962) - Let Me Entertain You Early days, Karl Malden as Herbie (stage name Uncle Jocko) intervenes somewhat to do the right thing for young June (Suzanne Cupito) and Louise (Diane Pace), a Styne/Sondheim tune getting murdered, and Mama Rose (Rosalind Russell) storms in, 1920’s vaudeville, in Gypsy, 1962.
Anchors Aweigh (1945) - I Begged Her Returning to sailors' lodgings after their first night on leave, Doolittle (Frank Sinatra) forgetting to brag, Brady (Gene Kelly) correcting, into their Sammy Cahn-Jule Styne number, staged by Kelly and Jack Donohue, in Anchors Aweigh, 1945.
It Happened In Brooklyn (1947) - Johann Sebastian Bach De-mobbed Danny (Frank Sinatra) gets a lift from schoolteacher Anne (Kathryn Grayson), acting on orders from a street cop, then to her classroom for her first vocal, a lyric from the credited songwriters (presumably Sammy Cahn, maybe Jule Styne) to a famous Bach miniature composition, Invention No. 1, in It Happened In Brooklyn, 1947.
It Happened In Brooklyn (1947) - Whose Baby Are You? Frank Sinatra is depressed soldier Danny, about to ship home from England, exhorted by a brassy Army nurse (Gloria Grahame) to join the party, and meeting English Jamie (Peter Lawford, his future Rat Pack pal, for their first movie scene together) for a Sammy Cahn-Jule Styne tune, early in It Happened In Brooklyn, 1947.
Straight Place And Show (1938) - Rootin' Hootin' Tootin' Cowboys So far we’ve only met the high-society horse-owning foils to the headliners but here the stars are introduced at the track, Ritz Brothers Jimmy, Harry and Al running a kiddie show, with a specialty number by Sid Kuller, Ray Golden and Jule Styne, early in Straight Place And Show, 1938.
Living It Up (1954) - Money Burns A Hole In My Pocket Reporter Wally (Janet Leigh) in New York doesn’t want romantic doctor Steve (Dean Martin) to know she’s having his buddy-patient (Jerry Lewis) seen by experts, guides him into a song from the Broadway musical (Hazel Flagg) based on the movie Nothing Sacred, 1937, of which this movie is a remake, in Living It Up, 1954.
Living It Up (1954) - You're Gonna Dance With Me Now the toast of Manhattan because he’s supposed to be dying of radiation poisoning (in the remake of Nothing Sacred, 1937, and based on the Broadway musical version Hazel Flagg), MC Sid Tomak introduces Jerry Lewis as doomed Homer for a song by Jule Styne and Bob Hilliard, with Sheree North dancing in her movie debut, Dean Martin and Janet Leigh watching, in Living It Up, 1954.
Two Guys From Texas (1948) - Every Day I Love You Both the leading men will get a private musical interlude with Dorothy Malone as decorative dude rancher Joan, first Dennis Morgan (later Jack Carson) as Steve with a Sammy Cahn-Jule Styne original, later recorded by both Frank Sinatra and Vaughn Monroe, in Warner Bros., in Two Guys From Texas, 1948.
Two Guys From Texas (1948) - There's Music In The Land Opening for Warner Bros. the follow-up to Two Guys From Milwaukee (1946), also produced by Alex Gottlieb and directed by David Butler, real-life best-buddy Wisconsinites Jack Carson and Dennis Morgan as song and dance men about to be stranded, with a Sammy Cahn-Jule Styne original, greeted by Andrew Tombes, in Two Guys From Texas, 1948.
Two Guys From Texas (1948) - Hankerin' Dorothy Malone as dude ranch owner Joan, in blue this time, having encouraged Jack Carson as traveling entertainer Danny in his pursuit, despite earlier efforts by his more suave buddy (Dennis Morgan), also with a Sammy Cahn-Jule Styne tune, on the very same set, in Warner Bros., in Two Guys From Texas, 1948.
Hole in the Head, A (1959) - High Hopes Dad Tony (Frank Sinatra) and son Ally (Eddie Hodges) with Jimmy Van Heusen and Sammy Cahn's Academy Award-winning novelty hit song, a version of which became a theme for the Sinatra-backed Kennedy presidential campaign, in director Frank Capra's comeback, A Hole in the Head, 1959.
It's A Great Feeling (1949) - There's Nothing Rougher Than Love Judy (Doris Day) headed home on the train after failure in Hollywood, dreams a Frenchified Sammy Cahn/Jule Styne number, shared with her erstwhile advocates Jack Carson and Dennis Morgan, in Warner Bros.' It's A Great Feeling, 1949.

Trailer

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes - (Original Trailer) Gentlemen prefer Marilyn Monroe preferring diamonds in her most famous musical Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) directed by Howard Hawks.
Gypsy - (Original Trailer) A domineering mother (Rosalind Russell) pushes her two daughters to burlesque stardom in Gypsy (1962), with Natalie Wood playing the title role of Gypsy Rose Lee.
Macao -- (Original Trailer) The original theatrical trailer for Macao, 1952, in which Josef von Sternberg, the director of The Blue Angel (1930), tried his hand at a film noir mystery, with Robert Mitchum and Jane Russell.
Step Lively - (Original Trailer) Fly-by-night producers dodge bill collectors while trying for one big hit in Step Lively (1944) starring Frank Sinatra.
Two Guys From Texas - (Original Trailer) Two vaudevillians on the run from crooks try to pass themselves off as cowboys in Two Guys From Texas (1948) starring Dennis Morgan and Jack Carson.
Romance on the High Seas -- (Original Trailer) Singer Doris Day gets mixed up in a series of romantic problems during a Caribbean cruise in Romance on the High Seas (1948) featuring "It's Magic" and other songs by Jule Styne & Sammy Cahn.
Living It Up - (Black-and-white Trailer) Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis replace Fredric March and Carole Lombard from Nothing Sacred (1937) in the color remake Living It Up (1954).
Cinderella Jones - (Original Trailer) Joan Leslie has to find and marry a genius to inherit $10 million in Busby Berkeley's musical Cinderella Jones (1946).
Stork Club, The - (Original Trailer) New York's famous The Stork Club (1945) is the setting for this Betty Hutton musical about a hat check girl and a millionaire.
Tonight and Every Night - (Original Trailer) Rita Hayworth falls for an RAF pilot in a musical with eye-popping color, Tonight and Every Night (1945).
Bells Are Ringing - (Original Trailer) An answering-service operator gets mixed up in her clients' lives in the musical romance, Bells Are Ringing (1960), starring Judy Holliday and Dean Martin.
It's a Great Feeling -- (Original Trailer) When nobody at Warner Bros. will work with him, movie star Jack Carson decides to turn an unknown into his co-star in It's a Great Feeling (1949).

Family

Isadore Stein
Father
Produce merchant. Owned a butter-and-egg store.
Anna Stein
Mother
Claire Bregman
Sister
Younger sister; survived him.
Stanley Styne
Son
Mother Ethel Rubinstein.
Norton Styne
Son
Mother Ethel Rubinstein; survived him.
Nicholas Styne
Son
Agent. With APA; married to Kelly Schumann; mother, Margaret Brown; survived him.
Katharine Styne
Daughter

Companions

Ethel Rubinstein
Wife
Married on August 9, 1926; divorced in 1951; originally from Chicago.
Margaret Ann Bissett Brown
Wife
Actor, model. Married on June 4, 1962; born in England; survived him.

Bibliography

"Jule: The Story of Composer Jule Styne"
Theodore Taylor (1979)

Notes

Co-produced, with Sammy Cahn, the revival of "Pal Joey" which won the New York Film Drama Critics Circle Award in 1951/52

In 1959 Styne received the following tribute, which was read aloud and entered into the Congressional Record: "The lives of Americans throughout our land as well as the lives of the people throughout the corners of the world have been enriched by the artistry and genius of Jule Styne."

Styne was elected to Songwriters Hall of Fame (1972)

He was elected to the Theatre Hall of Fame (1981).

Styne was a board member for review of ASCAP (1963-64).