Irving Starr


Biography

Filmography

 

Producer (Feature Film)

The Half-Breed (1952)
Producer
Battles of Chief Pontiac (1952)
Producer
Slightly French (1949)
Producer
Johnny Allegro (1949)
Producer
The Gallant Blade (1948)
Producer
The Cockeyed Miracle (1946)
Producer
Something for the Boys (1944)
Producer
Four Jills in a Jeep (1944)
Producer
Swing Fever (1944)
Producer
Bataan (1943)
Producer
Harrigan's Kid (1943)
Producer
Fingers at the Window (1942)
Producer
The Affairs of Martha (1942)
Producer
Sunday Punch (1942)
Producer
Time Out for Rhythm (1941)
Producer
Our Wife (1941)
Associate Producer
Music in My Heart (1940)
Producer
Inside Information (1939)
Producer
The Last Warning (1939)
Producer
The Witness Vanishes (1939)
Producer
Mystery of the White Room (1939)
Producer
The Last Express (1938)
Producer
Gambling Ship (1938)
Producer
The Lady in the Morgue (1938)
Producer
Danger on the Air (1938)
Producer
The Black Doll (1938)
Producer
Marriage Forbidden (1937)
Associate Producer
The Westland Case (1937)
Producer
Nobody's Fool (1936)
Associate Producer
Border Brigands (1935)
Producer
The Crimson Trail (1935)
Producer
Stone of Silver Creek (1935)
Producer
Rocky Rhodes (1934)
Producer
Phantom Thunderbolt (1933)
Supervisor
Drum Taps (1933)
Supervisor
The Lone Avenger (1933)
Supervisor
Fargo Express (1932)
Supervisor
Tombstone Canyon (1932)
Supervisor
Come On, Tarzan (1932)
Supervisor

Production Companies (Feature Film)

His Night Out (1935)
Company

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Return of the Gunfighter (1967)
Assistant

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Fingers At The Window (1942) - You Must Not Forgive Chicago is all-but shut down due to a wave of unsolved axe murders so actor Oliver (Lew Ayres), still in costume, saunters home after his play closed, and a bird-shop owner (Charles Waggenheim) is visited by not-quite seen Basil Rathbone, and Laraine Day happens by, early in MGM’s Fingers At The Window, 1942.
Time Out For Rhythm (1941) - Did Anyone Ever Tell You? Rollicking start, with Rosemary Lane belting a Sammy Cahn-Saul Chaplin original, Richard Lane her agent Mike at the bar with Harvard man Rudy Vallee, then fisticuffs when Princeton arrives, Allen Jenkins the piano player, in Columbia’s Time Out For Rhythm, 1941.
Time Out For Rhythm (1941) - The Boogie-Woogie Man Quite the novelty number, after a time-lapse montage in which Rudy Vallee and Richard Lane have become big-time agents, a number sung by Pee Wee Hunt, with the Glen Gray (Casa Loma) Band, composition by Sammy Cahn and Saul Chaplin, Franz/Frank Planer on camera but no credit for special or photographic effects, in the Columbia variety vehicle Time Out For Rhythm, 1941.
Time Out For Rhythm (1941) - A-Twiddlin' My Thumbs Ann Miller, first-billed among many in a Columbia variety feature, crushes a Sammy Cahn-Saul Chaplin tune, dance by LeRoy Prinz, as the maid for a singer that agents Rudy Vallee and Allen Jenkins hope to lure back, in B>Time Out For Rhythm, 1941.
Swing Fever (1943) - You're So Indifferent Kay Kyser introduces the song, Lena Horne as herself, with You're So Indifferent, by Sammy Fain and Mitchell Parish, edited so that it could be removed by theater owners in the South, as was MGM's regular practice at the time, in Swing Fever, 1943.
Music In My Heart (1940) - Punchinello Celebrating their engagement, with a reprise of a Bob Wright-Chet Forrest original, this is the only musical bit in the picture for Rita Hayworth, as Manhattanite Patricia, because it’s really a vehicle for Tony Martin, as singer Bob, support from Edith Fellows, George Tobias and George Humbert, in Music In My Heart, 1940.
Music In My Heart (1940) - It's A Blue World Star Tony Martin as singer Bob, with an Academy Award-nominated Bob Wright-Chet Forrest tune, which charted for 14 weeks, has won a radio gig, and we cut away to listener Rita Hayworth, who’s back with her millionaire boyfriend (Alan Mowbray), because she thinks Tony deceived her, which we’ll soon learn he hasn’t, near the end of Columbia’s Music In My Heart, 1940.
Music In My Heart (1940) - You Catching The Boat? We've already met Tony Martin as English singer Bob, happily rushing to a Manhattan dock because he's being deported after a big breakthrough performance, and now he meets Rita Hayworth as Patricia, also headed to the boat, Don Brodie the winning cabbie, in Columbia's Music in My Heart, 1940.
Four Jills In A Jeep (1943) - You Look Like Somebody I've Seen Just arrived on a base in England, in a story supposedly based on their own real experience on USO tours, Kay Francis, sparky Martha Raye, blonde Carole Landis and Mitzi Mayfair get collected by their minder Eddie (Phil Silvers), and meet handsome flier Ted (John Harvey), early in Four Jills In A Jeep, 1943.
Four Jills In A Jeep (1943) - How Blue The Night Joining a number from Dick Haymes, playing a soldier, song an original by Jimmy McHugh and Harold Adamson, Mitzi Mayfair as herself on the USO Tour in Europe, also Dick’s love interest, in 20th Century-Fox’s Four Jills In A Jeep, also starring Carole Landis, Martha Raye and Kay Francis.
Four Jills In A Jeep (1943) - Miss Betty Grable Could be some Betty Grable fans were disappointed with this reserved appearance, introduced in a USO-Radio show, Kay Francis acting as M-C, Jimmy Dorsey’s band, song by Jimmy McHugh and Harold Adamson, early in 20th Century-Fox’s Four Jills In A Jeep, 1943, also starring Carole Landis, Martha Raye and Mitzi Mayfair.
Swing Fever (1943) - That Symphonietta Guy Kay Kyser is the bumbling Southerner in a New York composing house whose sheet music has been snatched, appealing to the secretary (Pamela Blake) with a weird trick until the camera gets stopped by 21-year old MGM contract player, Ava Gardner, in a bit part, in Swing Fever, 1943.

Bibliography