Peter Bogdanovich


Director
Peter Bogdanovich

About

Also Known As
Derek Thomas
Birth Place
Kingston, New York, USA
Born
July 30, 1939

Biography

The Peter Bogdanovich story is a Hollywood tale through and through, replete with memorable associations and fantastic success, along with various ups and downs. Bogdanovich was a teenage actor in NYC and directed and produced an Off-Broadway production of Clifford Odets' "The Big Knife" at age 20. He worked as a film critic for such magazines as Film Culture, Movie and Esquire and began...

Family & Companions

Polly Platt
Wife
Production designer. Married in 1962; divorced in 1970; worked on his movies "Targets" through "Paper Moon"; mother of Bogdanovich's two children.
Cybill Shepherd
Companion
Actor. Together for eight years; relationship began during filming of "The Last Picture Show".
Dorothy Stratten
Companion
Model. Murdered by husband after he discovered her relationship with Bogdanovich; subject of Bob Fosse's biopic "Star 80" (1983); acted in "They All Laughed".
Louise Beatrice Hoogstraten
Wife
Actor. Born c. 1970; married on December 30, 1988; half-sister of Dorothy Stratten; credited in two movies as L B Straten; separated on February 16, 2001; she filed for divorce in March 2001.

Bibliography

"Peter Bogdanovich's Movie of the Week: 52 Classic Forms for One Full Year"
Peter Bogdanovich, Ballantine (1999)
"Who the Devil Made It?: Conversations with Robert Aldrich, George Cukor, Allan Dwan, Howard Hawks, Alfred Hitchcock, Chuck Jones, Fritz Lang, Joseph H. Lewis, Sidney Lumet, Leo McCarey, Otto Preminger, Don Siegel, Josef von Sternberg, Frank Tashlin, Edgar G. Ulmer, Raoul Walsh"
Peter Bogdanovich (editor and complier), Alfred A. Knopf (1997)
"A Moment with Miss Gish"
Peter Bogdanovich, Saint Teresa Press (1995)
"This Is Orson Welles"
Orson Welles and Peter Bogdanovich; Jonathan Rosenbaum (editor), HarperCollins (1992)

Notes

"I always looked at them [Bogdanovich and Polly Platt] like a replay of the old saying about Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers: 'He gave her class, she gave him sex.' With Peter and Polly, it was: 'He gave her the nerve, she gave him all her best ideas.'" --an unidentified former friend of the couple, quoted in Movieline, c. 1995.

"I think [Fritz] Lang said he was advised don't have an affair with an actress. And Lang said, 'I didn't listen.' And I thought when I was doing the interview, I didn't know what was in store. That was five years before "The Last Picture Show" (and the affair with Cybill Shepherd). Well, it's an occupational hazard--you're creating somebody in a way." --Peter Bogdanovich to the Los Angeles Times, May 15, 1997.

Biography

The Peter Bogdanovich story is a Hollywood tale through and through, replete with memorable associations and fantastic success, along with various ups and downs. Bogdanovich was a teenage actor in NYC and directed and produced an Off-Broadway production of Clifford Odets' "The Big Knife" at age 20. He worked as a film critic for such magazines as Film Culture, Movie and Esquire and began interviewing directors in the early '60s, writing monographs for the Metropolitan Museum of Art on Howard Hawks, Orson Welles and Alfred Hitchcock and publishing elsewhere the results of his talks with other luminaries like John Ford, Fritz Lang and Allan Dwan. Critics compared his breakout movie, "The Last Picture Show" (1971), to "Citizen Kane." "What's Up, Doc?" (1972) was his tribute to the screwball comedies of Howard Hawks. Starring Barbra Streisand and Ryan O'Neal, "What's Up, Doc?" was a huge success, just the prescription for a country weary of the Vietnam War. Bogdanovich followed with the Depression-era comedy-drama "Paper Moon" (1973), which marked the peak of his filmmaking fame. "Nickelodeon" (1976), recreating the early days of motion pictures, was also a success, but personal tragedy sidelined him for a time following the murder of companion Dorothy Stratten. He returned in 1985 with "Mask," which opened to good reviews, and was followed by "Texasville" (1990), a sequel to "The Last Picture Show," and "Noises Off" (1992), adapted from the hit stage play. Bogdanovich continued to care about and seek out directors from the early days of Hollywood, compiling a storehouse of anecdotal information about the pioneering days of Hollywood which found its way into "Who the Devil Made It?," a huge and valuable collection of his interviews with 16 great Hollywood directors that was published in 1997.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

The Great Buster: A Celebration (2018)
Director
She's Funny That Way (2015)
Director
Runnin' Down a Dream: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers (2007)
Director
The Mystery of Natalie Wood (2004)
Director
The Cat's Meow (2001)
Director
A Saintly Switch (1999)
Director
Naked City: A Killer Christmas (1998)
Director
Rescuers: Stories of Courage: Two Women (1997)
Director
The Price of Heaven (1997)
Director
To Sir With Love II (1996)
Director
The Thing Called Love (1993)
Director
Noises Off (1992)
Director
Texasville (1990)
Director
Illegally Yours (1988)
Director
Mask (1985)
Director
They All Laughed (1981)
Director
Saint Jack (1979)
Director
Nickelodeon (1976)
Director
At Long Last Love (1975)
Director
Paper Moon (1973)
Director
What's Up, Doc? (1972)
Director
Directed by John Ford (1971)
Director
The Last Picture Show (1971)
Director
Targets (1968)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

IT Chapter Two (2019)
Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché (2018)
Himself
The Great Buster: A Celebration (2018)
Narrator
The Other Side of the Wind (2018)
Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story (2017)
Himself
Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story (2017)
Self
While We're Young (2015)
Hitchcock/Truffaut (2015)
Himself
You Are Here (2014)
Pasadena (2013)
Casting By (2013)
The Healer (2012)
Corman's World: Exploits of a Hollywood Rebel (2011)
Himself
Abandoned (2010)
Queen of the Lot (2010)
Humboldt County (2008)
No Subtitles Necessary: Laszlo & Vilmos (2008)
The Doorman (2008)
Himself
Broken English (2007)
The Fifth Patient (2007)
Dedication (2007)
The Dukes (2007)
'Tis Autumn: The Search for Jackie Paris (2006)
Searching for Orson (2006)
Narrator
Infamous (2006)
The Definition of Insanity (2004)
A Constant Forge: The Life and Art of John Cassavetes (2001)
Himself
The Independent (2000)
Himself
Rated X (2000)
Highball (2000)
Claire Makes It Big (1999)
Festival in Cannes (1999)
Coming Soon (1999)
The Shoe Store (1998)
Himself
54 (1998)
Who Is Henry Jaglom? (1997)
Himself
Mr. Jealousy (1997)
Dr Poke
Howard Hawks: American Artist (1997)
Ben Johnson: Third Cowboy On the Right (1996)
Himself
Orson Welles: The One-Man Band (1995)
Narrator
Hollywood Mavericks (1990)
Himself
With Orson Welles: Stories From A Life (1989)
Bacall On Bogart (1988)
Saint Jack (1979)
Opening Night (1977)
Lost, Lost, Lost (1975)
F for Fake (1973)
Directed by John Ford (1971)
Himself, interviewer
Lions Love (1969)
Targets (1968)
Sammy Michaels
The Trip (1967)
The Wild Angels (1966)

Writer (Feature Film)

The Great Buster: A Celebration (2018)
Writer
The Great Buster: A Celebration (2018)
Screenplay
She's Funny That Way (2015)
Screenplay
Texasville (1990)
Screenplay
They All Laughed (1981)
Screenplay
Saint Jack (1979)
Screenplay
Nickelodeon (1976)
Screenplay
At Long Last Love (1975)
Screenplay
What's Up, Doc? (1972)
Story
The Last Picture Show (1971)
Screenwriter
Directed by John Ford (1971)
Writer
Targets (1968)
Screenwriter
Targets (1968)
Story

Producer (Feature Film)

The Other Side of the Wind (2018)
Executive Producer
The Great Buster: A Celebration (2018)
Producer
Orson Welles: The One-Man Band (1995)
Producer
Noises Off (1992)
Executive Producer
Texasville (1990)
Producer
Illegally Yours (1988)
Producer
The City Girl (1984)
Executive Producer
At Long Last Love (1975)
Producer
What's Up, Doc? (1972)
Producer
Targets (1968)
Producer

Editing (Feature Film)

The Last Picture Show (1971)
Editing
Targets (1968)
Film Editor

Music (Feature Film)

They All Laughed (1981)
Song

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

The Wild Angels (1966)
Assistant to the Director

Special Thanks (Feature Film)

Jackie Brown (1997)
Special Thanks To

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché (2018)
Other
Corman's World: Exploits of a Hollywood Rebel (2011)
Other
The Doorman (2008)
Other
A Constant Forge: The Life and Art of John Cassavetes (2001)
Other
The Shoe Store (1998)
Other
Who Is Henry Jaglom? (1997)
Other
Ben Johnson: Third Cowboy On the Right (1996)
Other
Hollywood Mavericks (1990)
Other

Director (Special)

The American Film Institute Salute to John Ford (1973)
Segment Director
Directed By John Ford (1971)
Director

Cast (Special)

This Is Orson Welles (2015)
Commemoration: Howard Hawks' Rio Bravo (2007)
Himself
Boffo! Tinseltown's Bombs and Blockbusters (2006)
A Decade Under the Influence (2003)
Himself
Jeff Bridges: Building Bridges (2002)
New York at the Movies (2002)
River Phoenix (2002)
It Conquered Hollywood: The Story of American International Pictures (2001)
Narrator
The O'Neals: The E! True Hollywood Story (2001)
Interviewee
If We Picked the Winners (2000)
Co-Host
Intimate Portrait: Madeline Kahn (2000)
The Making of Hitchcock's Favorite Film (2000)
Himself
Burt Reynolds: The E! True Hollywood Story (2000)
Interviewee
On Cukor (2000)
John Ford: An American Icon (1999)
Hitchcock, Selznick & the End of Hollywood (1999)
Intimate Portrait: Laura Dern (1999)
Dial H For Hitchcock: The Genius Behind the Showman (1999)
Interviewee
75 Years of Laughter (1998)
Interviewee
American Comedy Honors (1997)
Performer
Life's Greatest Holiday Stories (1997)
Preminger -- Anatomy of a Filmmaker (1996)
Himself
The Battle Over Citizen Kane (1996)
Ballyhoo: The Hollywood Sideshow! (1996)
Orson Welles: What Went Wrong? (1992)
Picture This: The Times of Peter Bogdanovich in Archer City, Texas (1991)
Himself
John Cassavetes (1990)
John Wayne Standing Tall (1989)
James Stewart: A Wonderful Life (1987)

Writer (Special)

Directed By John Ford (1971)
Screenplay

Special Thanks (Special)

Directed By John Ford (1971)
Screenplay

Misc. Crew (Special)

A Decade Under the Influence (2003)
Other
Directed By John Ford (1971)
Other

Cast (Short)

The Maltese Falcon: One Magnificent Bird (2006)
Himself

Director (TV Mini-Series)

Hustle: The Pete Rose Story (2004)
Director

Cast (TV Mini-Series)

Bella Mafia (1997)

Life Events

1956

Performed with American Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Connecticut

1958

Acted with New York Shakespeare Festival

1958

Began writing film criticism for publications including <i>The New York Times</i>, <i>Esquire</i> and <i>Film Culture</i>

1959

Directed and co-produced the Off-Broadway staging of "The Big Knife"

1961

Wrote monographs for the Museum of Modern Art Film Library on Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock and Howard Hawks

1964

Moved to California

1966

Hired as second unit director by Roger Corman for "Wild Angels"; claims to have done rewrites (uncredited), location scouting and editing; was hired after Corman read some of his film criticism

1966

First feature film credit (as additional sequence director and narrator), "Voyage to the Planet of Prehistoric Women" (credited as Derek Thomas)

1968

Feature directing and producing debut, "Targets," starring Boris Karloff and executive produced by Corman (also wrote and acted)

1971

Release of first documentary, "Directed by John Ford" (commissioned by the American Film Institute)

1971

Won acclaim for directing "The Last Picture Show"; received Oscar nominations for Best Director and Best Screenplay (shared with Larry McMurtry)

1972

Produced and directed "What's Up, Doc?" co-starring Ryan O'Neal and Barbra Streisand

1973

Again collaborated with O'Neal for "Paper Moon" (produced and directed), also co-starred a 10-year-old Tatum O'Neal who picked up a Supporting Actress Oscar; was the Directors Company's first offering

1974

Provided companion Cybil Shepard with a starring vehicle, "Daisy Miller"; film received lackluster critical reception

1976

Wrote and directed the heartfelt valentine to early days of moviemaking, "Nickelodeon"; third film with Ryan O'Neal; second with Tatum O'Neal

1979

Made a movie version of Paul Theroux's novel "Saint Jack"

1981

Released "They All Laughed"after Dorothy Stratten's murder; wrote screenplay and contributed music, in addition to directing; distributed film himself after failing to find a distributor due to the negative publicity surrounding the Stratten murder

1984

Published the memoir, <i>The Killing of the Unicorn: Dorothy Stratten</i>

1985

Directed the well received drama "Mask" co-starring Cher and Eric Stoltz

1986

Founded Crescent Moon Productions, Inc.

1990

Returned to "Last Picture Show" territory with the sequel "Texasville" (produced, directed and scripted), was a critical and box office failure

1992

Translated the door-slamming British sex farce from the stage to the screen as director of "Noises Off"

1993

Directed "The Thing Called Love," about a country singer-songwriter who wants to make it big in Nashville; one of River Phoenix's last roles

1995

Helmed segments of the Showtime anthology series' "Picture Windows" and "Fallen Angels"

1996

Directed a television sequel to 1967 feature film "To Sir With Love" (CBS) with Sidney Poitier reprising his role

1997

Helmed another CBS movie, "The Price of Heaven"

1998

Appeared as the leader of therapy group in "Mr. Jealousy"; co-starred and produced by Eric Stoltz

1998

Had a cameo appearance in the feature "54"

2000

Returned to acting, playing the recurring role of Dr. Melfi's (Lorraine Bracco) psychotherapist in the HBO series "The Sopranos"; also directed a fifth season episode of the series

2001

Returned to directing features with "The Cat's Meow" (released theatrically in 2002)

2003

Had a supporting role as a fictional version of himself in the Showtime comedy series "Out of Order"

2006

Cast in the Truman Capote biopic "Infamous"

2007

Appeared in Zoe Cassavetes' directorial debut, "Broken English"

Photo Collections

The Last Picture Show - Lobby Cards
Here are a few Lobby Cards from The Last Picture Show (1971). Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.

Videos

Movie Clip

Last Picture Show, The (1971) - That's A Roughneck For You Outside what amounts to a whole-town Christmas party (in novelist and co-screenwriter Larry McMurtry’s fictional 1951 Anarene, Texas) Jacy (Cybill Shepherd) frustrates jock boyfriend Duane (Jeff Bridges), contriving an excuse allowing her to slip away with Lester (Randy Quaid) to a promising country-club party in a bigger town, Peter Bogdanovich directing, in The Last Picture Show, 1971.
Nickelodeon (1976) - Ask For A German Bagel Ambitious Floridian Buck (Burt Reynolds), following a goofy lead to his second New York gig, enters a bakery that turns out to be a low-rent movie company (Gustav and Bertil Unger the twin proprietors), which gets raided by their bigger rivals, in Peter Bogdanovich's Nickelodeon, 1976.
Peter Bogdanovich On Orson Welles -- (TCM Original) TCM Classic Film Festival Director and author Peter Bogdanovich on The Magnificent Ambersons, 1942, and his long friendship with Orson Welles, from Saturday's screening at the TCM Classic Film Festival.
Saint Jack (1979) - Open, Always A Good Investment Opening with a pan mighty close to 360 degrees, director Peter Bogdanovich, back in the orbit of old friend producer Roger Corman, buys himself a big slice of Singapore, and introduces Ben Gazzara as the title character and his relations with gofer Gopi (Joseph Noël), in Saint Jack, 1979, from Paul Theroux’s novel and screenplay with Bogdanovich and Howard Sackler.
Saint Jack (1979) - Good Lover Bad Husband Ben Gazzara (the title character, a benevolent American ex-pat pimp in Singapore) takes care of an older friend helping him finance his own new brothel, then has an interview with a prospective professional (Monika Subramanian), in Peter Bogdanovich’s Saint Jack, 1979, with the popular Louis Armstrong recording of Oscar Peterson’s “Basin Street Blues.”
Saint Jack (1979) - Nothing To Do With The Animal At the Singapore airport Ben Gazzara (title character), executing an errand for his Chinese businessman boss, works his contacts and picks up English Leigh (Denholm Elliott), Andrew Chua driving the cab, Peter Bogdanovich directing from the script he co-wrote with novelist Paul Theroux and Howard Sackler, in Saint Jack, 1979.
Nickelodeon (1976) - That Crab Is Pure Genius! Lawyer Harrigan (Ryan O'Neal), swept into the entourage of early-movie magnate Cobb (Brian Keith), becoming a screenwriter (supplanting Arnold Soboloff, and Don Calfa as "Waldo") then meeting Kathleen (superodel Jane Hitchcock in her only major movie role), in Peter Bogdanovich's Nickelodeon, 1976.
Nickelodeon (1976) - Did You Say Court? From a prologue about early cinema, befuddled lawyer Harrigan (Ryan O'Neal), Jack Perkins his client, before the judge (Sidney Armus), then fleeing down an alley into the movie business, and a quick bit by Brian Keith, in Peter Bogdanovich's Nickelodeon, 1976.
Last Picture Show, The (1971) - She Was Just A Girl High schooler Sonny (Timothy Bottoms), pal Billy (Sam Bottoms) in tow, with mentor Sam "The Lion" (Ben Johnson), reconciled after a disagreement, fishing outside town, in 1951 Texas, in Peter Bogdanovich's The Last Picture Show, 1971.
Last Picture Show, The (1971) - Is It Something Bad? Texas high school senior Sonny (Timothy Bottoms) brings his football coach's lonely wife Ruth (Cloris Leachman), whom he's just met, home after a visit to the doctor for an unspecified ailment, in Peter Bogdanovich's The Last Picture Show, 1971.
Last Picture Show, The (1971) - Too Rough For Me Opening scenes, Sonny (Timothy Bottons) in sleepy Anarene, TX, 1951, picks up pal Billy (brother, Sam Bottoms) and visits Sam (Ben Johnson) at the pool hall, who comments on last night's football game, in Peter Bogdanovich's The Last Picture Show, 1971.
Last Picture Show, The (1971) - Trashy Behavior Texas teen Sonny (Timothy Bottoms) and pals are ashamed, bringing mute Billy (Sam Bottoms) back to town after buying a prostitute for him, called out by pool hall and theater owner Sam (Academy Award winner Ben Johnson), in The Last Picture Show, 1971, Peter Bogdanovich directing, from Larry McMurtry's novel.

Trailer

Promo

Family

Borislav Bogdanovich
Father
Post-impressionist painter.
Herma Bogdanovich
Mother
Antony Bogdanovich
Brother
Died in 1938 from burns sustained when mother accidentally spilled scalding soup on him.
Antonia Bogdanovich
Daughter
Photographer, actor. Born c. 1967; worked on "Texasville".
Alexandra Welles Bogdanovich
Daughter
Actor. Born c. 1970.

Companions

Polly Platt
Wife
Production designer. Married in 1962; divorced in 1970; worked on his movies "Targets" through "Paper Moon"; mother of Bogdanovich's two children.
Cybill Shepherd
Companion
Actor. Together for eight years; relationship began during filming of "The Last Picture Show".
Dorothy Stratten
Companion
Model. Murdered by husband after he discovered her relationship with Bogdanovich; subject of Bob Fosse's biopic "Star 80" (1983); acted in "They All Laughed".
Louise Beatrice Hoogstraten
Wife
Actor. Born c. 1970; married on December 30, 1988; half-sister of Dorothy Stratten; credited in two movies as L B Straten; separated on February 16, 2001; she filed for divorce in March 2001.

Bibliography

"Peter Bogdanovich's Movie of the Week: 52 Classic Forms for One Full Year"
Peter Bogdanovich, Ballantine (1999)
"Who the Devil Made It?: Conversations with Robert Aldrich, George Cukor, Allan Dwan, Howard Hawks, Alfred Hitchcock, Chuck Jones, Fritz Lang, Joseph H. Lewis, Sidney Lumet, Leo McCarey, Otto Preminger, Don Siegel, Josef von Sternberg, Frank Tashlin, Edgar G. Ulmer, Raoul Walsh"
Peter Bogdanovich (editor and complier), Alfred A. Knopf (1997)
"A Moment with Miss Gish"
Peter Bogdanovich, Saint Teresa Press (1995)
"This Is Orson Welles"
Orson Welles and Peter Bogdanovich; Jonathan Rosenbaum (editor), HarperCollins (1992)
"Picture Shows: The Life and Films of Peter Bogdanovich"
Andrew Yule, Limelight Editions (1992)
"Bogdanovich's Picture Shows"
J Harris Thomas, Scarecrow Press (1990)
"The Killing of the Unicorn: Dorothy Stratten (1960-1980)"
Peter Bogdanovich, William Morrow (1984)
"Pieces of Time"
Peter Bogdanovich, Arbor House (1973)
"Allan Dwan - The Last Pioneer"
Peter Bogdanovich, Praeger (1971)
"Fritz Lang in America"
Peter Bogdanovich, Praeger (1969)
"John Ford"
Peter Bogdanovich, University of California Press (1968)
"The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock"
Peter Bogdanovich, Film Library of the Museum of Modern Art (1963)
"The Cinema of Howard Hawks"
Peter Bogdanovich, Film Library of the Museum of Modern Art (1962)
"The Cinema of Orson Welles"
Peter Bogdanovich, Film Library of the Museum of Modern Art (1961)

Notes

"I always looked at them [Bogdanovich and Polly Platt] like a replay of the old saying about Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers: 'He gave her class, she gave him sex.' With Peter and Polly, it was: 'He gave her the nerve, she gave him all her best ideas.'" --an unidentified former friend of the couple, quoted in Movieline, c. 1995.

"I think [Fritz] Lang said he was advised don't have an affair with an actress. And Lang said, 'I didn't listen.' And I thought when I was doing the interview, I didn't know what was in store. That was five years before "The Last Picture Show" (and the affair with Cybill Shepherd). Well, it's an occupational hazard--you're creating somebody in a way." --Peter Bogdanovich to the Los Angeles Times, May 15, 1997.

" ... The generation that we're dealing with in my book, which covers 16 directors who were born between 1885 and 1924, grew up either with no films or silent films. Silent film was a medium in which the goal was to convey everything visually without dialogue and without titles."When sound came in, the whole question of 'how do you convey this fleeting thought, this plot point, this nuance of character visually' became, 'What kind of dialogue can we write?' There's the difference right there. It's only because the great veterans of the silent era--most of them--continued well into the talking era that the talkies from '29 to '61 or '62 had as much visual power and impact as they did. Despite the fact that sound or dialogue came to dominate, the most effective moments in all their films are still silent moments, and they knew that." --Bogdanovich in Moviemaker, January 1998.