Douglas Slocombe


Director Of Photography

About

Birth Place
London, England, GB
Born
February 10, 1913
Died
February 22, 2016
Cause of Death
Undisclosed

Biography

A celebrated English cinematographer, Douglas Slocombe received his training as both a photo-journalist and as a newsreel cameraman during WWII, filming the German invasion of Poland and Holland. After the war, he joined Ealing Studios, where unlike many directors of photography he did not rise through the ranks. Slocombe used his newsreel training to basically learn on the job, shooting...

Biography

A celebrated English cinematographer, Douglas Slocombe received his training as both a photo-journalist and as a newsreel cameraman during WWII, filming the German invasion of Poland and Holland. After the war, he joined Ealing Studios, where unlike many directors of photography he did not rise through the ranks. Slocombe used his newsreel training to basically learn on the job, shooting such acclaimed films as "Kind Hearts and Coronets" (1949), "The Lavender Hill Mob" (1952) and "The Man in the White Suit" (1955). For much of his career, he worked with the same camera operator, Chic Waterson. An elegant craftsman whose trademark was the detail of his shots, Slocombe later contributed to landmark British features of the 1960s including "The L-Shaped Room" (1962) and Joseph Losey's "The Servant" (1963). For John Huston's "Freud" (1962), Slocombe had to work in five distinct styles to represent what was occurring onscreen: there was the strict narrative, a distinct style for flashbacks, one for dream sequences, another for nightmares and yet another for memories. His extraordinary success was honored with a British Academy Award. Despite his excellent, crisp work on such efforts as "The Lion in Winter" (1968), Slocombe earned his first Oscar nomination for "Travels With My Aunt" (1972). He brought to life the Roaring Twenties in Jack Clayton's "The Great Gatsby" (1974) and earned a second Academy nod for "Julia" (1977). That same year, he began an association with wunderkind Steven Spielberg, shooting additional footage in India for "Close Encounters of the Third Kind." While Slocombe did fine work for other (sometimes mediocre) films, some of his best work was for Spielberg's Indiana Jones trilogy. He garnered his third Academy Award nomination for "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (1981) and went on to bring a unified look to the sequels "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" (1984) and his last feature "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" (1989). Douglas Slocombe died in his native London on February 22, 2016. He was 103 years old.

Filmography

 

Cinematography (Feature Film)

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989)
Director Of Photography
Water (1986)
Director Of Photography
Lady Jane (1986)
Director Of Photography
Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984)
Director Of Photography
Never Say Never Again (1983)
Director Of Photography
The Pirates of Penzance (1983)
Director Of Photography
Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)
Director Of Photography
Nijinsky (1980)
Director Of Photography
The Lady Vanishes (1979)
Director Of Photography
Lost And Found (1979)
Director Of Photography
Caravans (1978)
Director Of Photography
Nasty Habits (1977)
Director Of Photography
Julia (1977)
Director Of Photography
The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With the Sea (1976)
Director Of Photography
The Bawdy Adventures Of Tom Jones (1976)
Director Of Photography
Rollerball (1975)
Director Of Photography
Love Among the Ruins (1975)
Director Of Photography
Hedda (1975)
Director Of Photography
That Lucky Touch (1975)
Director Of Photography
The Maids (1974)
Director Of Photography
The Destructors (1974)
Director Of Photography
The Great Gatsby (1974)
Director Of Photography
Jesus Christ Superstar (1973)
Director Of Photography
Travels with My Aunt (1972)
Director of Photography
Murphy's War (1971)
Director of Photography
The Music Lovers (1971)
Director of Photography
The Buttercup Chain (1971)
Director of Photography
The Italian Job (1969)
Director of Photography
The Lion in Winter (1968)
Director cine
Boom! (1968)
Lighting Camera
Fathom (1967)
Director of Photography
The Fearless Vampire Killers; or, Pardon Me but Your Teeth Are in My Neck (1967)
Director of Photography
Robbery (1967)
Director of Photography
Promise Her Anything (1966)
Director of Photography
The Blue Max (1966)
Director of Photography
A High Wind in Jamaica (1965)
Director of Photography
The Servant (1964)
Director of Photography
The Third Secret (1964)
Director of Photography
Guns at Batasi (1964)
Director of Photography
The L-Shaped Room (1963)
Director of Photography
Wonderful To Be Young! (1962)
Director of Photography
Freud (1962)
Director of Photography
The Mark (1961)
Director of Photography
Scream of Fear (1961)
Director of Photography
The Boy Who Stole a Million (1960)
Director Of Photography
Davy (1958)
Director of Photography
All at Sea (1958)
Director of Photography
Tread Softly Stranger (1958)
Director Of Photography
Decision Against Time (1957)
Director of Photography
The Smallest Show on Earth (1957)
Director Of Photography
Ludwig II (1955)
Director Of Photography
The Lavender Hill Mob (1952)
Cinematographer
Mandy (1952)
Cinematographer
The Man in the White Suit (1951)
Director Of Photography
Saraband for Dead Lovers (1948)
Cinematographer
It Always Rains on Sunday (1947)
Director Of Photography
The Captive Heart (1946)
Director Of Photography
Lights Out in Europe (1940)
Danzig and Polish Photographer

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)
Photography
Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949)
Photography

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989)
Dp/Cinematographer
Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984)
Dp/Cinematographer
Never Say Never Again (1983)
Dp/Cinematographer
Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)
Dp/Cinematographer
Nijinsky (1980)
Dp/Cinematographer
The Great Gatsby (1974)
Dp/Cinematographer
The Destructors (1974)
Dp/Cinematographer
Ludwig II (1955)
Other

Cast (Special)

Forever Ealing (2002)
Himself

Life Events

1945

Shot first film, "Dead of Night"

1945

Became director of photography at Ealing Studios

1949

Served as director of photography on "Kind Hearts and Coronets"

1952

Was cinematographer for "The Lavender Hill Mob"

1962

Won particular attention for his work on "Freud", directed by John Huston

1967

Shot Roman Polanski's "The Fearless Vampire Killers"

1971

Worked with Ken Russell on "The Music Lovers"

1972

Earned Oscar nomination for "Travels with My Aunt"

1974

Won praise for his lush cinematographic work on "The Great Gatsby"

1977

Received second Academy Award nomination for his work on "Julia", helmed by Fred Zinnemann

1977

Began first collaboration with Steven Spielberg, additional photography on India sequences of "Close Encounters of the Third Kind"

1981

Was director of photography on Spielberg's "Raiders of the Lost Ark"; garnered third Oscar nomination

1983

Shot the James Bond film "Never Say Never Again"

1984

Was cinematographer on the second installment of the trilogy "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom", directed by Spielberg

1986

Shot Trevor Nunn's "Lady Jane"

1989

Earned last feature credit on "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade", directed by Spielberg

Videos

Movie Clip

Fearless Vampire Killers, The (1967) - Opening,That Night Clever title sequence and first shots from The Fearless Vampire Killers; or, Pardon Me but Your Teeth Are in My Neck, 1967, absent that studio generated sub-title, starring director Roman Polanski, Sharon Tate and Jack MacGowran.
Fearless Vampire Killers, The (1967) - Garlic, My Boy, Garlic! Professor Abronsius (Jack MacGowran) is frozen solid on arrival at a Transylvanian Inn, but is aroused along with aide Alfred (Director Roman Polanski) when they see tell-tale signs, in The Fearless Vampire Killers, 1967.
Julia (1977) - I Am Paris In a flashback, young Lillian Hellman and friend Julia (Susan Jones and Lisa Pelikan) grow up (into Jane Fonda and Vanessa Redgrave) and Hellman's reverie resumes, in Fred Zinnemann's Julia, 1977.
Julia (1977) - Be A Coal Miner Gruff boyfriend Dashiell Hammett (Jason Robards Jr.), impatient with troubled writer Lillian Hellman (Jane Fonda) at the beach house, early in Fred Zinnemann's Julia, 1977.
Julia (1977) - A Perfect Time Of Life Jane Fonda playing the author of the underlying novel, Lillian Hellman's Pentimento, recalling the departure of the title character (Vanessa Redgrave) for Europe, in Fred Zinnemann's Julia, 1977.
Rollerball (1975) - He Shoots He Scores! From the lengthy opening sports-action sequence, the Houston team, led by Jonathan-E (James Caan), with buddy Moonpie (John Beck) puts away Madrid, then hits the showers talking Tokyo, from Norman Jewison's Rollerball, 1975.
Fearless Vampire Killers, The (1967) - You've Seen My Dress? Director Roman Polanski featuring himself (as "Alfred") in several complex shots, as he discovers Sarah (Sharon Tate) and the frozen-again Professor Abronsius (Jack MacGowran) in The Fearless Vampire Killers, 1967.
Mark, The (1961) -- That's The Blue Boy Still mysterious as Fuller (Stuart Whitman), having taken a room in an un-named English city, chats with landlady Mrs. Cartwright (Brenda De Banzie) and husband (Maurice Denham), some emphasis on a print of a famous painting, early in The Mark, 1961, co-starring Rod Steiger and Maria Schell.
Mark, The (1961) -- She Knows You've Been In Prison We've just learned from boss Clive (Donald Wolfit) that our protagonist Fuller (Stuart Whitman) has been in prison and was hired on his doctors' recommendation, his crime still not revealed, when executive assistant Mrs. Leighton (Maria Schell) is introduced, in The Mark, 1961.
Mark, The (1961) -- This Is Called Group Therapy We still don't know what crime Fuller (Stuart Whitman) committed, as he visits his Doc McNally (Rod Steiger), as a condition of his parole, having taken a new job in a new town, with a somewhat revealing flashback, in The Mark, 1961.
Travels With My Aunt (1972) - Perhaps You Find Religion Toting the ashes of the woman he believed to be his mother, Henry (Alec McCowen) is hustled away by his previously-thought-dead "Aunt" Augusta (Maggie Smith) to her London flat where he meets her live-in "Wordsworth," (Louis Gossett Jr.), early in George Cukor's Travels With My Aunt, 1972.
Travels With My Aunt (1972) - That Sort Of Scandal Tending dahlias in suburban London, bank manager Henry (Alec McCowen) takes a call from aunt Augusta (Maggie Smith) warning that police may be seeking her boyfriend's contraband mingled with the ashes of his newly-deceased mother, in Travels With My Aunt, 1972, from the Graham Greene novel.

Trailer

Close Encounters of the Third Kind - (Special Edition Trailer) This is the theatrical trailer for the "Special Edition" of Steven Spielberg's 1977 sci-fi classic starring Richard Dreyfuss and Melinda Dillon.
Lavender Hill Mob, The - (Original Trailer) An overlooked gold transporter with twenty years service plots to steal a million pounds of gold in the comedy The Lavender Hill Mob (1951) starring Alec Guinness.
Decision Against Time - (Original Trailer) A test pilot (Jack Hawkins) thinks back on his past as he fights to survive a burning plane in Decision Against Time (1957).
Davy - (Original Trailer) The Goon Show's Harry Secombe stars as a musical-hall entertainer who defies family tradition to audition for the opera.
Italian Job, The (1969) - (Original Trailer) Michael Caine blows the bloody doors off in the original heist thriller, The Italian Job (1969).
Fearless Vampire Killers, The - (Original Trailer) A bumbling professor tracks vampires in the wilds of Eastern Europe in Roman Polanski's horror-comedy The Fearless Vampire Killers (1967).
Rollerball - (Original Trailer) The star of a bloodthirsty future sport tries to clean up the game before it kills him in Rollerball (1975) starring James Caan.
L-Shaped Room, The - (U.S. Trailer) An unmarried, pregnant French woman (Leslie Caron) takes up residence in a British boarding house in The L-Shaped Room (1962).
Scream of Fear - (Original Trailer) A wheelchair-bound heiress (Susan Strasberg) doubts her sanity when she sees her dead father's body around the family estate in Scream of Fear (1961).

Family

George Slocombe
Father
Journalist. Based in Paris; managed to interview both Hitler and Mussolini; was also instrumental in obtaining the release of Gandhi from jail.

Bibliography