Simone Simon


Actor
Simone Simon

About

Birth Place
France
Born
April 23, 1911
Died
February 22, 2005

Biography

Delicately pretty French actress whose first stab at a Hollywood career (1936-38) proved inconclusive but who returned for another try, bolstered by her domestic success in Jean Renoir's "La Bete Humaine" (1938). Simon enjoyed better fortune the second time around, distinguishing herself as a vixen from hell (literally) in William Dieterle's "The Devil and Daniel Webster" (1941) and in t...

Photos & Videos

Cat People - Simone Simon Publicity Stills
La bete humaine - Movie Poster
Mademoiselle Fifi - Publicity Stills

Biography

Delicately pretty French actress whose first stab at a Hollywood career (1936-38) proved inconclusive but who returned for another try, bolstered by her domestic success in Jean Renoir's "La Bete Humaine" (1938). Simon enjoyed better fortune the second time around, distinguishing herself as a vixen from hell (literally) in William Dieterle's "The Devil and Daniel Webster" (1941) and in the atmospheric thrillers, "Cat People" (1942) and "Curse of the Cat People" (1944). She continued to appear in international productions--notably Max Ophuls's stylish erotic comedy, "La Ronde" (1950)--through the mid-1950s.

Life Events

1931

Screen debut, "Le Chanteur inconnu"

1936

Hollywood debut, "Girls' Dormitory"

Photo Collections

Cat People - Simone Simon Publicity Stills
Here are several stills of Simone Simon, taken to publicize RKO's Cat People (1942), produced by Val Lewton. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
La bete humaine - Movie Poster
Here is an original French poster for Jean Renoir's La bete humaine (1938), starring Jean Gabin and Simone Simon.
Mademoiselle Fifi - Publicity Stills
Here are a few photos taken to help publicize RKO's Mademoiselle Fifi (1944), starring Simone Simon and Kurt Kreuger. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
The Devil and Daniel Webster - Movie Poster
Here is the Window Card from RKO's The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941, released as All That Money Can Buy). Window Cards were 14x22 mini posters designed to be placed in store windows around town during a film's engagement. A blank space at the top of the poster featured theater and playdate infromation.
Cat People - Behind-the-Scenes Photo
Here is a photo taken behind-the-scenes during production of RKO's Cat People (1942), directed by Jacques Tourneur and starring Simone Simon.

Videos

Movie Clip

Cat People (1942) - That's What Makes Me Dangerous Increasingly troubled newlywed immigrant Irina (Simone Simon) is unaware that friend Alice (Jane Randolph) has nothing but benevolent intentions toward her worried husband Oliver (Kent Smith), thus a famous sequence from director Jacques Tourneur, in the original Cat People, 1942.
Devil And Daniel Webster, The (1941) - You're Not Dorothy The tantalizing Belle (Simone Simon) appears to Jabez (James Craig) at the birth of his first child then visits mother Mary (Ann Shirley) and Ma Stone (Jane Darwell) in The Devil And Daniel Webster, 1941.
Devil And Daniel Webster, The (1941) - What A Fine Fellow You Were Tumult as Jabez (James Craig) throws out Webster (Edward Arnold) and Mary (Ann Shirley) then encounters Belle (Simone Simon) and Scratch (Walter Huston) who's come to collect in The Devil And Daniel Webster, 1941, a.k.a. All That Money Can Buy.
Devil And Daniel Webster, The (1941) - Opening, It Could Even Happen To You The famously unusual opening credits for William Dieterle's The Devil And Daniel Webster, 1941, also known as All That Money Can Buy, from a story by Stephen Vincent Benet.
Mademoiselle Fifi (1944) - In Occupied France Opening from director Robert Wise and screenwriters Josef Mischel and Peter Ruric, from a Guy de Maupassant story, establishing France during the 1870 Prussian occupation, Charles Waldron a priest, Kurt Kreuger the improbably named title character, in Mademoiselle Fifi, 1944, starring Simone Simon.
Mademoiselle Fifi (1944) - Little Launderesses Or Liberals Introducing the protagonist, Simone Simon as laundress Elisabeth, catching a stage during the 1870 Prussian occupation of France with her social superiors (the bourgeoisie Alan Napier, Romaine Callender, Helen Freeman, Norma Varden, and Edmund Glover the priest), Jason Robards the voluble merchant, John Emery the agitator, in Mademoiselle Fifi, 1944.
Mademoiselle Fifi (1944) - More Than A Patriot Everybody happier as resourceful laundress Elisabeth (Simone Simon) has shared her plentiful poultry with her famished upper-class stage coach companions, congratulated especially by Norma Varden and Jason Robards Sr., during the 1870 Prussian occupation of France, in RKO’s Mademoiselle Fifi, 1944.
Mademoiselle Fifi - With Fifi Fellow travelers listen in as Prussian Lieutenant "Fifi" von Eyrick (Kurt Kreuger) attempts to bend Elizabeth (Simone Simon) to his will in Mademoiselle Fifi, 1944.
La Bete Humaine (1938) - You Men Are Disgusting Wild shifts of tone and content as conversation turns to confrontation between corrupt husband Robaud (Fernand Ledoux) and young wife Severine (Simone Simon), after her shopping trip, in Jean Renoir's La Bete Humaine, 1938.
La Bete Humaine (1938) - The Heat Was Unbearable Much tension as Robaud (Fernand Ledoux) and Severine (Simone Simon) commit a quick off-screen murder on a train, then realize off-duty engineer Lantier (Jean Gabin) is a witness, in Jean Renoir's La Bete Humaine, 1938.
Le Plaisir (a.k.a. House Of Pleasure) - Youth And Sardines From the narrating voice of the original author Guy de Maupassant, the introduction of the painter Jean (Daniel Gelin) and model Josephine (Simone Simon), in the third segment of director Max Ophuls' Le Plaisir, (a.k.a. House Of Pleasure) 1952.
La Ronde (1950) - But Behave Yourself! Soldier Franz (Serge Reggiani) has made it to the dance where we meet Marie, the housemaid (Simone Simon), unsure how to treat his advances, in two remarkable shots, in director Max Ophuls' La Ronde, 1950.

Trailer

Bibliography