Adrian Scott


Producer, Screenwriter

About

Birth Place
Arlington, New Jersey, USA
Born
February 06, 1912
Died
December 25, 1972

Biography

Magazine editor turned screenwriter who became a producer with RKO in 1943. Scott was responsible for such films as the Raymond Chandler adaptation, "Murder, My Sweet" (1944; from "Farewell My Lovely"), and the biting indictment of anti-Semitism, "Crossfire" (1947). His career was ended when he refused to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1947 and he served a y...

Family & Companions

Anne Shirley
Wife
Actor. Married 1945, divorced 1949; her last film was the Scott production "Murder, My Sweet" (1944).

Biography

Magazine editor turned screenwriter who became a producer with RKO in 1943. Scott was responsible for such films as the Raymond Chandler adaptation, "Murder, My Sweet" (1944; from "Farewell My Lovely"), and the biting indictment of anti-Semitism, "Crossfire" (1947). His career was ended when he refused to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1947 and he served a year in prison as one of the "Hollywood Ten." His fate was sealed by the damning testimony of Edward Dmytryk, who directed the majority of Scott's films.

Life Events

1940

Screenwriting debut, "Keeping Company"

1944

First film as producer, "Farewell My Lovely"

1947

Refused to testify before House Un-American Activities Committee; later sentenced to one year in prison

Videos

Movie Clip

Crossfire (1947) - Open, Murder Dark and dramatic opening to Edward Dmytryk's Crossfire, 1947, starring Robert Young, Robert Mitchum, Robert Ryan and Gloria Grahame, from a novel by Richard Brooks.
Crossfire (1947) - Nobody Likes Cops Mary Mitchell (Jacqueline White) and Washington D.C. cop Finlay (Robert Young), trying to help her recently discharged soldier murder-suspect husband, visit taxi-dancer Ginny (Gloria Grahame), who should be able to give him an alibi, in Edward Dmytryk's Crossfire, 1947.
Crossfire (1947) -- I Must Have The Wrong Place In the opening we saw two guys, maybe military, leaving an apartment after a fight, so now we see the guy’s dead, Robert Young a Washington, D.C. cop, Jacqueline Price the gal who reported it, and Robert Ryan as soldier lurking outside the door, in Edward Dmytryk’s celebrated Crossfire, 1947.
Deadline At Dawn (1946) - The Sailor Took It Blind "Sleepy" (Marvin Miller) having walked upstairs during credits, woozy Edna (Lola Lane) finds the money she owes him gone, from a story by Cornell Woolrich, script by Clifford Odets, the only film by noted stage director Harold Clurman, Deadline At Dawn, 1946, starring Susan Hayward.
Deadline At Dawn (1946) - It Rhymes With Moon Savvy New York taxi-dancer June (Susan Hayward) has volunteered to accompany small-town on-leave sailor Alex (Bill Williams) as he tries to return a bundle of cash he thinks he must have stolen while drunk, in Deadline At Dawn, 1946, from a Cornell Woolrich story.
Deadline At Dawn (1946) - Let's Melt Some Ice Together Sailor Alex (Bill Williams), secretly afraid he’s committed a murder while drunk, is reluctant to part with kindly cabbie Gus (Paul Lukas), but meets taxi-dancer June (Susan Hayward) back at the scene, both discovering they still haven’t found evidence clearing him, in Deadline At Dawn, 1946.
Murder, My Sweet (1944) - Are You Familiar With Jade? Raymond Chandler's famous P-I Marlowe (Dick Powell) narrating, as Anne (Anne Shirley) introduces him to her father Grayle (Miles Mander) and his wife Helen (Claire Trevor) for a talk about stolen jade, in Murder, My Sweet, directed by Edward Dmytryk.
Murder, My Sweet (1944) - The Smoke Didn't Move Fake psychic and jewel thief Amthor (Otto Kruger) tricking thug Moose (Mike Mazurki) into throttling P-I Marlowe (Dick Powell), whom he earlier hired to find his girlfriend, who then enters his second semi-conscious episode, in Murder, My Sweet, 1944, directed by Edward Dmytryk, from a Raymond Chandler novel.
Murder, My Sweet (1944) - You're A Private Eye Temporarily blinded P-I Philip Marlowe (Dick Powell) begins the flashback, with director Edward Dmytryk's famous introduction of Moose Malone (Mike Mazurki), early in Murder, My Sweet, 1944, from Raymond Chandler's Farewell, My Lovely.
Murder, My Sweet (1944) - You Do Your Own Typing? Anne Shirley (as "Ann Grayle"), posing as a reporter, not fooling P-I Marlowe (Dick Powell), who's determined to find out who killed his client, in Murder, My Sweet, 1944, from Raymond Chandler's Farewell, My Lovely.
Murder, My Sweet (1944) - A Black Pool Opened Up Flinty P-I Marlowe (Dick Powell) expresses distaste as he agrees to help foppish Marriott (Douglas Walton) execute a trade, in Edward Dmytryk's Murder,My Sweet, 1944, from a Raymond Chandler novel.
Deadline At Dawn (1946) - Marry John Barrymore Hung-over on-leave sailor Alex (Bill Williams) in Manhattan, having awakened not knowing how he got $1,400 in cash, meets taxi-dancer June (Susan Hayward) who's been dealing with a client (Edgar Caldwell) and a bouncer (Edward Gargan), in Deadline At Dawn, 1946.

Trailer

Companions

Anne Shirley
Wife
Actor. Married 1945, divorced 1949; her last film was the Scott production "Murder, My Sweet" (1944).

Bibliography