Kathryn Scola


Biography

Filmography

 

Writer (Feature Film)

Night unto Night (1949)
Screenwriter
Colonel Effingham's Raid (1946)
Screenwriter
The Constant Nymph (1943)
Screenwriter
Happy Land (1943)
Screenwriter
The Lady from Cheyenne (1941)
Screenwriter
The House Across the Bay (1940)
Screenwriter
And One Was Beautiful (1940)
Contract Writer
One Night in the Tropics (1940)
Adaptation
Elsa Maxwell's Hotel for Women (1939)
Screenwriter
Elsa Maxwell's Hotel for Women (1939)
Story
Alexander's Ragtime Band (1938)
Screenwriter
Always Goodbye (1938)
Screenwriter
The Baroness and the Butler (1938)
Screenwriter
Submarine Patrol (1938)
Contract Writer
Wife, Doctor and Nurse (1937)
Screenwriter
Second Honeymoon (1937)
Screenwriter
It Had to Happen (1936)
Screenwriter
The Glass Key (1935)
Screenwriter
Peter Ibbetson (1935)
Contr to trmt
Woman Wanted (1935)
Contract Writer
One Hour Late (1934)
Screenwriter
A Modern Hero (1934)
Screenwriter
The Merry Frinks (1934)
Story and Screenplay
A Lost Lady (1934)
Screenwriter
Ever Since Eve (1934)
Contract Writer
Fashions of 1934 (1934)
Adaptation
Shadows of Sing Sing (1933)
Story
Baby Face (1933)
Screenwriter
Female (1933)
Screenwriter
Luxury Liner (1933)
Screenwriter
Midnight Mary (1933)
Screenwriter
Lilly Turner (1933)
Screenwriter
Night After Night (1932)
Cont
Almost Married (1932)
Contract Writer
6 Hours to Live (1932)
Contract Writer
A Passport to Hell (1932)
Contract Writer
Devil's Lottery (1932)
Contract Writer
La dama atrevida (1931)
Screenwriter
Wicked (1931)
Cont and dial
The Lady Who Dared (1931)
Screenplay version
One Night at Susie's (1930)
Screenwriter
One Night at Susie's (1930)
Dial

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Midnight Mary (1933) - A Girl's Gotta Live Loretta Young (title character), awaiting her sentence in a murder trial, is recalling years past via the spines of court record books, including meeting her pal Bunny (Una Merkel) and her future employer-boyfriend, hoodlum Leo (Ricardo Cortez), in Midnight Mary, directed by William A. Wellman.
Midnight Mary (1933) - Who Might That Lovely Lady Be? We know that knockout lady gambler Mary (Loretta Young) and coat check babe Bunny (Una Merkel) both work for gangsters, so we know something’s up at the casino, as we meet sophisticate Tom (Franchot Tone) and dyspeptic buddy Sam (Andy Devine), in MGM’s Midnight Mary, 1933.
Baby Face (1933) - Have You Had Any Experience? Lily (Barbara Stanwyck, title character) has come straight from the boxcar on-which she rode-in to the employment office of a big city firm, where she meets the defenseless Pratt (Maynard Holmes), in the pre-Code shocker Baby Face, 1933.
Alexander's Ragtime Band - Blue Skies In an all-Irving Berlin musical, the composer's two favorite singers (Ethel Merman as "Jerry", Alice Faye as "Stella," having just met) take turns with "Blue Skies," in Alexander's Ragtime Band, 1938.
Female (1933) - Drake Motor Car First scene directed by Michael Curtiz (presumably, though others contributed without credit) establishes a standard American car company and it's unusual CEO, the chairman and daughter of the founder, Allison Drake (Ruth Chatterton), Lois Wilson her visiting friend, in Female, 1933.
Female (1933) - You Are A Goddess In the just-barely pre-Code Warner Bros./First National potboiler, Ruth Chatterton as auto CEO Allison plucks a prospective boy-toy (Philip Reed) from her staff, then reconsiders, in one of a handful of pictures shot at the famous Frank Lloyd Wright Ennis House in LA, in Female, 1933.
One Night At Susie's (1930) - These Millionaires, They're So Eccentric Press agent Dick (Douglas Fairbanks) is alarmed when the showgirl pals of his fianceè Mary (Billie Dove) are turned away from a party at the posh apartment of her crooked Broadway producer, with whom she’s stuck upstairs, with a neat elevator process-shot, in One Night At Susie’s, 1930.
One Night At Susie's (1930) - Rods On The Table Creditable early-talkie technique, jovial murderous mobsters clustered around the microphone, introducing Susie (Helen Ware) of the title and providing backstory for leading man Douglas Fairbanks Jr., opening the First National Billie Dove vehicle One Night At Susie’s, 1930.
One Night At Susie's (1930) - Will Your Underwear Fit Him? Broadway press agent Dick (Douglas Fairbanks Jr.) introduces showgirl fianceè Mary (Billie Dove) to good-samaritan Susie (Helen Ware), boarding-house operator and his de-facto mom, who later deals with another tenant and her sort-of butler (Tully Marshall), in One Night At Susie’s, 1930.
Baby Face (1933) - Sweetheart Of The Night Shift Her despicable father (Robert Barrat) clears the speakeasy so he can sell the favors of his daughter Lily (Barbara Stanwyck, title character) to an already smashed local politician (Arthur Hohl), but she objects, early in Warner Bros.' Baby Face 1933.
Baby Face (1933) - Be A Master, Not A Slave! Mentor and small-town Nietzschean philosopher Cragg (Alphonse Ethier) has advice for Lily (Barbara Stanwyck, title character), at loose ends after the accidental death of her very abusive father, in Baby Face, 1933.
Baby Face (1933) - Maybe I Could Use Her We know that Lily (Barbara Stanwyck) has been sleeping her way upward in the company but this is the first scene for John Wayne as Jimmy, and Douglas Dumbrille as his boss Brody, speedy progress, in Warner Bros.' Baby Face, 1933.

Trailer

Bibliography