Paul Scofield


Actor
Paul Scofield

About

Also Known As
David Paul Scofield
Birth Place
Hurstpierpoint, England, GB
Born
January 21, 1922
Died
March 19, 2008
Cause of Death
Leukemia

Biography

This commanding English stage actor began appearing in films in 1954 in "That Lady." Scofield has spent the majority of his career on stage since his debut in the 1930s. He spent the 40s and most of the 50s in various repertory companies honing his skills and appearing mostly in the classics.Scofield originated the role of Sir Thomas More in 1960 in the Robert Bolt play "A Man for All Se...

Family & Companions

Joy Parker
Wife
Actor, writer. Married May 15, 1943.

Bibliography

"Paul Scofield: An Intimate Biography"
Garry O'Connor, Macmillan (2002)

Notes

Named a Commander in the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 1956.

Scofield is the only British actor ever to decline a knighthood. (He did so in 1968.) He was awarded the title of Companion of Honour, however, in December 2000.

Biography

This commanding English stage actor began appearing in films in 1954 in "That Lady." Scofield has spent the majority of his career on stage since his debut in the 1930s. He spent the 40s and most of the 50s in various repertory companies honing his skills and appearing mostly in the classics.

Scofield originated the role of Sir Thomas More in 1960 in the Robert Bolt play "A Man for All Seasons" in the West End. The following year, he recreated the role on Broadway and won the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play. Scofield garnered raves and accolades (including the Best Actor Oscar) for the 1966 film version. He toured extensively with "King Lear" in the early 60s and was effective in the 1971 Peter Brook film. While his film appearances have been sporadic, Scofield has made vivid impressions particularly in a brief turn as the ghost of Hamlet's father in Franco Zeffirelli's "Hamlet" (1990), and as the troubled protagonist's principled father in Robert Redford's look at the 1950s game show scandals, "Quiz Show" (1994) which netted him a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nod. He also earned praise as the judge in Nicholas Hytner's film version of Arthur Miller's "The Crucible" (1996).

Life Events

1939

Joined the Croyden Repertory Theatre at age 17

1941

Performed with Bideford Repertory Theatre

1944

Was member of Birmingham Repertory Theatre

1946

Reportedly turned down a seven-year contract from a Hollywood studio

1950

Debut as stage director, "Pericles"

1954

Screen debut in "That Lady"

1960

Created role of Sir Thomas More in "A Man for All Seasons" at London's West End (recreated role on Broadway in 1961)

1963

First film in nine years, "The Train"

1969

US TV debut, "Male of the Species"

1971

Played "King Lear" in Peter Brook's film adapatation

1989

Returned to films after a thirteen year absence, "Mrs. Corbett's Ghost"

1994

Played Mark Van Doren in Robert Redford's "Quiz Show"

1996

Appeared in Nicholas Hytner's film adaptation of Arthur Miller's "The Crucible"

Photo Collections

A Man for All Seasons - Movie Posters
A Man for All Seasons - Movie Posters

Videos

Movie Clip

Train, The (1965) - Money Is A Weapon German Colonel von Waldheim (Paul Scofield) aims to persuade General von Lubitz (Richard Munch) that they should confiscate fine French art, as the liberation of Paris looms, in John Frankenheimer's The Train, 1965.
Train, The (1965) - There's A War French rail inspector Labiche (Burt Lancaster) scurries back from some sabotage work, encounters innkeeper Christine (Jeanne Moreau) whom he's just met, German Colonel von Waldheim (Paul Scofield) and aide Schmidt (Jean Bouchaud) getting stonewalled, in John Frankenheimer's The Train, 1965.
Man For All Seasons, A (1966) - Pray By All Means! Summoned to see Cardinal Wolsey (Orson Welles), Thomas More (Paul Scofield) makes no apology for not helping the king seek another divorce, in Fred Zinnemann's Best Picture Academy Award winner, A Man For All Seasons, 1966.
Man For All Seasons, A (1966) - Lord Chancellor The Chief Justice (Jack Gwillim) administers the most holy oath of office to the new chancellor Sir Thomas More (Paul Scofield) in an impressive single shot from Fred Zinnemann's A Man For All Seasons, 1966.
Man For All Seasons, A (1966) - Remember My Office! Newly appointed Chancellor Thomas More (Paul Scofield) suffers impertinence from suitor Roper (Corin Redgrave), daughter Margaret (Susannah York) and knave Rich (John Hurt) in A Man For All Seasons, 1966, from Robert Bolt's play.
Man for All Seasons, A (1966) - Opening Sequence Majestic music by Georges Delerue accompanies the opening sequence and credits from the 1966 Best Picture winner A Man for All Seasons, directed by Fred Zinnemann, starring Paul Scofield, Robert Shaw and Leo McKern, from the play and screenplay by Robert Bolt.
Man for All Seasons, A (1966) - He Wants Another King Henry VIII (Robert Shaw) and his party pretend their visit to Thomas More (Paul Scofield) is a surprise, his daughter (Susannah York) and wife (Wendy Hiller) acquiescing, in Fred Zinnemann's A Man For All Seasons, 1966, from the Robert Bolt play.

Trailer

Companions

Joy Parker
Wife
Actor, writer. Married May 15, 1943.

Bibliography

"Paul Scofield: An Intimate Biography"
Garry O'Connor, Macmillan (2002)

Notes

Named a Commander in the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 1956.

Scofield is the only British actor ever to decline a knighthood. (He did so in 1968.) He was awarded the title of Companion of Honour, however, in December 2000.

Awarded honorary degree (LL.D.) from University of Glasgow in 1968.

Awarded honorary degree (D.Litt.) from University of Kent at Canterbury in 1973.

Awarded honorary degree (D.Litt.) from Oxford University in June 2002.

John Gielgud once described Paul Scofield by saying, "He is withdrawn, remote, a sphinx without a secret."