Harold Schuster


Director

About

Also Known As
Harold D. Schuster
Birth Place
Cherokee, Iowa, USA
Born
August 01, 1902
Died
July 19, 1986

Biography

Actor and assistant cameraman turned editor, who made his mark on such films as F.W. Murnau's landmark silent, "Sunrise" (1927), and the delightful love story, "Zoo in Budapest" (1933). Schuster made an encouraging directorial debut in the late 1930s but turned out mostly unremarkable features until defecting to TV in the 1950s....

Biography

Actor and assistant cameraman turned editor, who made his mark on such films as F.W. Murnau's landmark silent, "Sunrise" (1927), and the delightful love story, "Zoo in Budapest" (1933). Schuster made an encouraging directorial debut in the late 1930s but turned out mostly unremarkable features until defecting to TV in the 1950s.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

The Crowning Experience (1960)
Director
Courage of Black Beauty (1957)
Director
Portland Exposé (1957)
Director
Dragoon Wells Massacre (1957)
Director
Down Liberty Road (1956)
Director
Finger Man (1955)
Director
Tarzan's Hidden Jungle (1955)
Director
The Return of Jack Slade (1955)
Director
Security Risk (1954)
Director
Loophole (1954)
Director
Port of Hell (1954)
Director
Jack Slade (1953)
Director
Kid Monk Baroni (1952)
Director
So Dear to My Heart (1949)
Photoplay Director
The Tender Years (1948)
Director
Breakfast in Hollywood (1946)
Director
Marine Raiders (1944)
Director
My Friend Flicka (1943)
Director
On the Sunny Side (1942)
Director
Girl Trouble (1942)
Director
The Postman Didn't Ring (1942)
Director
Small Town Deb (1941)
Director
A Very Young Lady (1941)
Director
Ma, He's Making Eyes at Me (1940)
Director
Zanzibar (1940)
Director
Diamond Frontier (1940)
Director
Framed (1940)
Director
South to Karanga (1940)
Director
One Hour to Live (1939)
Director
Swing That Cheer (1938)
Director
Exposed (1938)
Director
Dinner at the Ritz (1937)
Director
Wings of the Morning (1937)
Director
Spring Tonic (1935)
Director of added scenes

Editing (Feature Film)

One More Spring (1935)
Film Editor
The Man Who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo (1935)
Film Editor
The Farmer Takes a Wife (1935)
Film Editor
Marie Galante (1934)
Film Editor
Now I'll Tell (1934)
Film Editor
I Am Suzanne! (1934)
Editing
All Men Are Enemies (1934)
Film Editor
Berkeley Square (1933)
Film Editor
Dangerously Yours (1933)
Editing
Zoo in Budapest (1933)
Editing
Call Her Savage (1932)
Film Editor
A Passport to Hell (1932)
Film Editor
Almost Married (1932)
Editing
Devil's Lottery (1932)
Editing
Chandu the Magician (1932)
Film Editor
Quick Millions (1931)
Editing
Skyline (1931)
Film Editor
Ambassador Bill (1931)
Film Editor
Always Goodbye (1931)
Editing
Don't Bet on Women (1931)
Film Editor
Reckless Living (1931)
Editing
The Man Who Came Back (1931)
Film Editor
Such Men Are Dangerous (1930)
Film Editor
Renegades (1930)
Film Editor
Women Everywhere (1930)
Film Editor
South Sea Rose (1929)
Film Editor
Frozen Justice (1929)
Film Editor
Four Devils (1929)
Film Editor
Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (1927)
Cutter

Life Events

1937

Directorial debut "Wings of the Morning"

Videos

Movie Clip

My Friend Flicka (1942) - Losing And Busting And Forgetting Opening the Twentieth Century-Fox adaptation of the then-current popular novel by Mary O’Hara, rancher Rob (Preston Foster), daughter Hildy (Diana Hale) and hand Gus (James Bell) discover the latest trouble wrought by (inexplicably English) son Ken (Roddy McDowall), in My Friend Flicka, 1942.
My Friend Flicka (1942) - I Didn't Mean To Scare Them Big horse action on location in Wyoming where the original novel by Mary O’Hara was set, rancher Rob (Preston Foster) and hired man Gus (James Bell) are bringing in the herd when accident-prone son Ken (Roddy McDowall) causes a minor avalanche, and meets a colt, in My Friend Flicka, 1942.
My Friend Flicka (1942) - Rocket's Loco On their Wyoming ranch, checking damage done by a mountain lion, rancher Rob (Preston Foster), with hired Gus (James Bell), has reluctantly promised a horse to his sort-of hapless son Ken (Roddy McDowall), who makes a challenging choice, in My Friend Flicka, 1942.
So Dear To My Heart (1948) - The Greatest Wealth Narration and vocal by John Beal, song by Irving Taylor and Ticker Freeman, story-book opening by Disney animators including Ub Iwerks and Josh Meador, and a quick look at the leading lad, Bobby Driscoll as Jerry, in the 1948 adaptation of the book by Sterling North, So Dear To My Heart.
So Dear To My Heart (1948) - Black As A Lump Of Coal Jerry (Bobby Driscoll) and hardworking Granny (Beulah Bondi) check to see if the lambs have been born, on her Indiana farm, and we meet the black sheep who will become the boy’s true pet-project, in Walt Disney’s live-action plus animation feature So Dear To My Heart, 1948.
So Dear To My Heart (1948) - It's What You Do With What You Got Jerry (Bobby Driscoll) is surprised when his scrapbook image of his new prized black lamb pet Jeremiah comes alive, and is educated by the “Wise Old Owl” (voice by Ken Carson), with a song by Don Raye and Gene DePaul, the first fully animated sequence in Disney’s So Dear To My Heart, 1948.
Wings Of The Morning (1937) - My Friend The Duke With cousin and Irish host Sir Valentine (Stewart Rome), Canadian Kerry (Henry Fonda) is fuming over Spanish duchess Maria (Annabella) who, until now, has been dressed as a boy, in Wings Of The Morning, 1937.
Wings Of The Morning (1937) - Haven For All Gypsies Opening the first British film in 3-strip Technicolor, Lord Clontarf (Leslie Banks) intervenes as police on his land assail Gypsy Mairik (D.J. Williams) and daughter Marie (Annabella), in Wings Of The Morning, 1937.

Trailer

Bibliography