Franklin J. Schaffner


Director
Franklin J. Schaffner

About

Also Known As
Franklin James Schaffner
Birth Place
Japan
Born
May 30, 1920
Died
July 02, 1989
Cause of Death
Cancer

Biography

One of the leading directors of the "Golden Age"" of live TV who later proved himself a capable handler of both epic action features and intimate dramas. Schaffner began his career as an assistant on "The March of Time" documentary series and directed over 150 TV plays, including the original broadcasts of "Twelve Angry Men" (1954) and "The Caine Mutiny Court Martial" (1955). He enjoyed ...

Family & Companions

Jean Schaffner
Wife
Established an alumni medal in his honor at the American Film Institute.

Bibliography

"Franklin J. Schaffner"
Erwin Kim, Scarecrow Press (1985)

Notes

President of the Directors Guild of America from 1987-89.

Biography

One of the leading directors of the "Golden Age"" of live TV who later proved himself a capable handler of both epic action features and intimate dramas. Schaffner began his career as an assistant on "The March of Time" documentary series and directed over 150 TV plays, including the original broadcasts of "Twelve Angry Men" (1954) and "The Caine Mutiny Court Martial" (1955). He enjoyed success with his 1960 Broadway production of "Advise and Consent" and made his first feature film, "The Stripper"--adapted from a play by William Inge--in 1963.

Schaffner is best known for "Planet of the Apes" (1968), "Patton" (1969) and "Papillon" (1973), which yielded one of Dustin Hoffman's finest performances.

Life Events

1948

Joined CBS-TV

1960

Broadway directing debut, "Advise and Consent"

1963

Film directing debut, "The Stripper"

1989

Final film, "Welcome Home," posthumously dedicated to him

Videos

Movie Clip

Papillon (1973) - No One Is Innocent En route to the penal colony in French Guyana ca. 1933, Steve McQueen (title character) introduces himself to wisecracking counterfeiter Dega (Dustin Hoffman), their first conversation, early in director Franklin Schaffner's international hit Papillon, 1973.
Papillon (1973) - You Escape, They Hunt Arriving from France, Steve McQueen (title character) and Dega (Dustin Hoffman) get their first look at Devil's Island, with comments from returning inmate Julot (Don Gordon), who takes his own desperate steps, in Papillon, 1973, from the international best-selling memoir by Henri Charriere.
Planet Of The Apes (1968) - Hell With The Scarecrows Hot on the trail of vegetation they found on what appeared to be a desolate planet, astronauts Taylor (Charlton Heston), Landon (Robert Gunner) and Dodge (Jeff Burton) haven’t noticed the figures tracking them on the cliffs, trouble ensuing, early in Planet Of The Apes, 1968.
Planet Of The Apes (1968) - Human See Human Do Injured and now a captive, human Taylor (Charlton Heston), still unable to speak, has made more progress with ape scientist Zira (Kim Hunter) than with minder Julius (Buck Kartalian), but none with her boss Dr. Zaius (Maurice Evans), introduced here, in Planet Of The Apes, 1968.
Planet Of The Apes (1968) - How Do You Account For Me? Animal psychologist (and Chimpanzee) Zira (Kim Hunter) has proven that human Taylor (Charlton Heston), still unable to speak because of his throat injury, can communicate, though her colleague and boyfriend Cornelius (Roddy McDowall) isn't convinced by his story, in Planet Of The Apes, 1968.
Nicholas and Alexandra (1971) - Your Gentle Czar Tender early sequence, 1904, as Nicholas Romanov, the last Russian czar (Michael Jayston), learns he has a son, and discusses names with the Czarina (Janet Suzman) in director Franklin J. Schaffner's Nicholas and Alexandra, 1971.
Nicholas And Alexandra (1971) - Little Yellow Buddhists Selfish and racist notions from the Queen Mother (Irene Worth) before the Czar (Michael Jayston), Czarina (Janet Suzman) and Grand Duke (Harry Andrews) meet the new monk Rasputin (Tom Baker) in Nicholas and Alexandra, 1971.
Nicholas and Alexandra (1971) - God Meant Me To Rule Laurence Olivier (in his barely-recognizable period, as "Count Witte"), with the Grand Duke (Harry Andrews), reasons with the Czar (Michael Jayston) about Korea, in Nicholas and Alexandra, 1971.
Planet Of The Apes (1968) - I Leave The 20th Century Expository prologue before credits from director Franklin J. Schaffner, Taylor (Charlton Heston) ruminating and hitting the sack, crew Robert Gunner and Jeff Burton already snoozing, in the original Planet Of The Apes, 1968, co-starring Kim Hunter and Roddy McDowall.
Nicholas and Alexandra (1971) - Think Of The Soldiers The imperial composure is threatened when the Czar (Michael Jayston) and Czarina (Janet Suzman), busy blessing soldiers, learn their hemophiliac son is bleeding, in Nicholas and Alexandra, 1971.
Patton (1970) - Americans, Traditionally, Love To Fight Based on no actual speech, assembled by screenwriter Francis Ford Coppola from quotes from the subject, George C. Scott in his Academy Award-winning title role, director Franklin Schaffner elected to make the famous monologue his opening, in Patton, 1970.
Patton (1970) - What Happened At Kasserine? Director Franklin Schaffner's staging of the arrival of the the general (George C. Scott, title character) in Tunisia, 1943, after a disastrous encounter with the Germans, largely as described in the autobiography of General Omar Bradley (Karl Malden), in the hit bio-pic Patton, 1970.

Trailer

Companions

Jean Schaffner
Wife
Established an alumni medal in his honor at the American Film Institute.

Bibliography

"Franklin J. Schaffner"
Erwin Kim, Scarecrow Press (1985)

Notes

President of the Directors Guild of America from 1987-89.