Harry Saltzman


Producer

About

Birth Place
St John, New Brunswick, CA
Born
October 27, 1915
Died
September 21, 1994
Cause of Death
Heart Attack

Biography

Canadian-born producer who began in theater and TV in the 1940s and was working in the film industry by mid-decade. Aside from providing the unoriginal story for "The Iron Petticoat" (1956), a "Ninotchka" rip-off which starred the incredibly mismatched team of Bob Hope and Katharine Hepburn, Saltzman did little to receive screen credit, though he did cut his producer's teeth on TV with i...

Family & Companions

Adriana Saltzman
Wife
Survived him.

Biography

Canadian-born producer who began in theater and TV in the 1940s and was working in the film industry by mid-decade. Aside from providing the unoriginal story for "The Iron Petticoat" (1956), a "Ninotchka" rip-off which starred the incredibly mismatched team of Bob Hope and Katharine Hepburn, Saltzman did little to receive screen credit, though he did cut his producer's teeth on TV with installments of "Robert Montgomery Presents" and "Captain Gallant of the Foreign Legion."

Saltzman made his name when he became one of the co-founders (with director Tony Richardson and playwright John Osborne) of Woodfall Film Productions, which created some of the cornerstone works of the memorable "Angry Young Man" school of British "kitchen sink" realism. "Look Back in Anger" (1959) was a good adaptation of John Osborne's landmark play featuring a blistering performance by Richard Burton. "Saturday Night and Sunday Morning" (1960), still recognized as one of the signature works of its era, was an even finer film, and brought Albert Finney to stardom. And many still feel that Laurence Olivier gave the performance of a lifetime in "The Entertainer" (1960).

If the "Angry Young Man" films made Saltzman's name, it was his partnership with Albert R. ("Cubby") Broccoli and their purchasing of the screen rights to Ian Fleming's James Bond spy novels that made his fortune. In 1962, the duo formed Eon Productions and brought the first Bond adventure, "Dr. No," to the screen. Although not the international box-office smash its sequels would become, it set a pattern for the handsome, lavishly produced, technically skilled, mildly risible and tongue-in-cheek romps which followed. Via companies such as Eon and the later Danjaq S.A., Saltzman and Broccoli boosted Sean Connery and later Roger Moore to silver screen stardom and cast the mold for the action blockbusters which would later dominate US cinema.

On his own Saltzman also produced another gimmicky but more ironic and dark view of the spying profession, "The Ipcress File" (1965), with Michael Caine as bespectacled agent Harry Palmer. Forming still another company, Lowndes Productions, without Broccoli, Saltzman oversaw two intriguing sequels, "Funeral in Berlin" (1966) and "Billion Dollar Brain" (1967). After "The Man with the Golden Gun" (1974), Saltzman and Broccoli ended their collaboration on the Bond flicks, and Saltzman sold his interest in Danjaq to United Artists. His subsequent output was modest, though he did produce the interesting misfire "Nijinsky" (1980), a biopic of the great dancer and his affair with mentor Sergei Diaghilev; a short-lived Broadway play, "A Little Family Business" (1982), and the fascinating Emir Kusturica art-house item, "Time of the Gypsies" (1988).

Life Events

1945

Entered the film industry

1956

Provided story basis for the screenplay of the film, "The Iron Petticoat"

1958

Was one of the co-founders, along with director Tony Richardson and playwright/screenwriter John Osborne, of the production company, Woodfall Film Productions

1959

Produced first film, "Look Back in Anger"

1960

First screen credit as "executive producer", "Saturday Night and Sunday Morning"

1962

Formed Eon Productions with Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli

1962

Produced (with Broccoli) the first of the James Bond films, "Dr. No"

1965

Produced (without Albert Broccoli) the first of three spy films featuring the character of Harry Palmer, "The Ipcress File"

1974

Produced last James Bond film, "The Man with the Golden Gun"; was also last producing collaboration with Albert Broccoli

1975

Sold interest in Danjaq to United Artists, which had distributed the James Bond films

1980

Produced first film in six years, "Nijinsky"

1980

Cut down his activities after suffering a stroke

1982

Produced the short-lived Broadway play, "A Little Family Business", starring Angela Lansbury and John McMartin

1988

Produced another film eight years later, his last, "Dom Za Vesanje/Time of the Gypsies", a British-Yugoslavian co-production

Videos

Movie Clip

Diamonds Are Forever (1971) - Who Is Your Floor? In Amsterdam, James Bond (Sean Connery), pretending to be jewel smuggler Peter Franks, engages the real one (Joe Robinson) in a muscular brawl in an elevator, with Tiffany (Jill St. John), whom we believe is buying his subterfuge, observing in Diamonds Are Forever, 1971.
Thunderball (1965) - Do I Seem Healthy? Perhaps the only scene in which Bond (Sean Connery) ever shouts "Help!", strapped to a traction table by the irritable Patricia (Molly Peters) in Thunderball, 1965.
Goldfinger (1964) - Personal Vendetta Back at HQ, Bond (Sean Connery) tells "M" (Bernard Lee) about the killing of Jill Masterson, confirms he's up for the job, then does customary banter with Moneypenny (Lois Maxwell) in Goldfinger, 1964.
Dr. No (1963) - Moneypenny, M Bond (Sean Connery) is briefed on his mission and lectured about his gun as Moneypenny (Lois Maxwell) and "M" (Bernard Lee) make their first appearances (with Peter Burton as Major Boothroyd) in Dr. No, 1963.
Live And Let Die (1973) - Nothing About My Future? Entering a Harlem restaurant (called “Fillet Of Soul”) gently pursuing possible cohorts of a suspicious Caribbean dictator, James Bond (Roger Moore) is snatched, meeting soothsayer Solitare (Jane Seymour), goon Tee Hee (Julius Harris), and the gangster “Mr. Big,” early in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - Did You Mess With That? SPOILER here in Yaphet Kotto’s Bond-villain performance, captured Bond (Roger Moore) is interrogated by Mr. Big, who wants to know whether he’s despoiled Solitare (Jane Seymour) and thereby destroyed her psychic powers, meanwhile discussing his own links to the mysterious dictator Kananga, in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - She Had The Power And Lost It Yaphet Kotto as still largely mysterious Caribbean dictator Dr. Kananga is pressing his resplendent tarot card reader Solitare (Jane Seymour) about recent failures in her prognostications about Bond (Roger Moore, in his first performance, in the 8th 007 feature), who is on an aerial stake-out with colleague Quarrel (Roy Stewart), in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - The Man Who Shares My Hairbrush In fictional San Monique, bumbling but decorative novice CIA operative Rosie (ex-model and Playboy “bunny” Gloria Hendry) joins Bond (Roger Moore, in his first portrayal of 007) hiring a boat to visit the dictator’s private island, captained by Quarrel (Roy Stewart), in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - Title Song, Insomnia, Sir? After three murders (of not-too-dashing likely-English guys) in the prologue, the title song by Paul & Linda McCartney, produced by George Martin, (which went to #2 on the Billboard U.S. chart, becoming by-far the most successful Bond theme ever) followed by M (Bernard Lee) intruding on 007 (Roger Moore, in his first appearance in the role) and a paramour (Madeline Smith), in Live And Let Die, 1973.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - A Location Fix On Double-O-Seven M and Q and Moneypenny (Bernard Lee, Desmond Llewelyn and Lois Maxwell) express concern about 007, then we find him (George Lazenby, the first-ever new James Bond, in his Aston-Martin) pursuing Diana Rigg (as Teresa “Tracy” Draco in a Mercury) on the Portugese coast, opening On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - Do Not Kill Me, Mr. Bond Abducted from a Portugese seaside resort by thugs reporting to European union-syndicate godfather Marc-Ange Draco (Gabriele Ferzetti), whose daughter (Diana Rigg) is his latest conquest, Bond (George Lazenby, in his first and only appearance as 007) frees himself to make inquiries, in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - I Suspect They're Trying To Kill Me His false identity blown, trying to evade Blofeld’s thugs (Ilse Steppat et al), James Bond (George Lazenby) sneaks about the carnival at Lauterbrunnen (more precisley, Murren-Schilthorn, Switzerland), when he’s rescued by Tracy (a.k.a. Contessa Teresa, Diana Rigg), whom we haven’t seen for ages, in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.

Trailer

Man With The Golden Gun, The (1974) -- (Original Trailer) A particularly literal representation of the title, in the trailer for the 9th James Bond feature, Roger Moore’s second appearance, with Christopher Lee as scary Scaramanga, and somewhat dual Bond-girls, Maud Adams and Britt Ekland, in The Man With The Golden Gun, 1974.
Live And Let Die (1973) -- (Original Trailer) Fans today might forget that Jane Seymour was “introduced” as a Bond girl in the eighth feature in the series, with Roger Moore in his first outing, and Yaphet Kotto the chief villain, with no trace in the trailer of the hit theme song by Paul & Linda McCartney and Wings, from Live And Let Die, 1973.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) -- (Original Trailer) There’s a case to be made that the producers overshot the mark in compensating for the absence of Sean Connery, in the sixth James Bond feature, giving George Lazenby possibly more promotion than he needed, in the ever-reëvaluated On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969, with Diana Rigg and Telly Savalas.
From Russia With Love (1964) -- (Original Trailer) James Bond (Sean Connery) is tempted with a Russian decoder and a beautiful blonde in From Russia With Love (1963).
Goldfinger (1964) -- (Original Trailer) United Artists and producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli’s trailer for the hit third James Bond feature, starring Sean Connery, with Honor Blackman as Pussy Galore, Harold Sakata as Oddjob, and Gert Fröbe as the title character, in Goldfinger, 1964.
You Only Live Twice (1967) -- (Original Trailer) Sean Connery as James Bond winds up in Japan, investigating a space hijacking, in the fifth 007 feature from producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. “Cubby” Broccoli, You Only Live Twice, 1967, with Akiko Wakabayashi.
Thunderball (1965) -- (Original Trailer) Sean Connery as 007 winds up chasing nuclear bombs in the Bahamas, Terence Young directing, Claudine Auger as Domino, and Adolfo Celi as the villain Largo, in the fourth and biggest-yet James Bond feature, Thunderball, 1965.
Dr. No (1963) -- (Original Trailer) For the first James Bond feature, the original trailer, from United Artists, producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. “Cubby” Broccoli and director Terence Young, starring Sean Connery and Ursula Andress, Dr. No, 1963.
Ipcress File, The - (Original Trailer) Michael Caine brought a touch of realism to the James Bond world playing bespectacled British secret agent Harry Palmer in The Ipcress File (1965).
Battle Of Britain - (Original Trailer) Michael Caine and Sir Laurence Olivier head an all-star cast in the story of the Battle Of Britain (1969).
Billion Dollar Brain - (Original Trailer) Harry Palmer (Michael Caine) must stop a U.S. general from launching an invasion of Russia with a supercomputer in Billion Dollar Brain (1967).
Look Back in Anger - (Original Trailer) Richard Burton is playwright John Osborne's original "angry young man" in Tony Richardson's film version of Look Back In Anger (1959).

Family

Steven Saltman
Son
Survived him.
Hilary Saltzman
Daughter
Survived him.
Merry Saltzman
Daughter
Survived him.
Mina Saltzman
Sister
Survived him.

Companions

Adriana Saltzman
Wife
Survived him.

Bibliography