Renzo Rossellini


Biography

Renzo Rossellini's musical talents have contributed to a variety of Hollywood productions. Rossellini began his entertainment career with his music featured in films like "La Nave Bianca" (1941), "Open City" (1946) and "Germany Year Zero" (1947) with Edmund Moeschke. His music also appeared in "L' Amore" (1948) featuring Anna Magnani, "Paisan" (1948) with Carmela Sazio and the dram...

Biography

Renzo Rossellini's musical talents have contributed to a variety of Hollywood productions. Rossellini began his entertainment career with his music featured in films like "La Nave Bianca" (1941), "Open City" (1946) and "Germany Year Zero" (1947) with Edmund Moeschke. His music also appeared in "L' Amore" (1948) featuring Anna Magnani, "Paisan" (1948) with Carmela Sazio and the drama "Stromboli" (1950) with Ingrid Bergman. In the fifties, Rossellini's music continued to appear on the silver screen, including in films like "Sins of Rome" (1952) with Ludmilla Tcherina, the crime feature "The Man From Cairo" (1953) with George Raft and "La Donna piu bella del mondo" (1955). His work was also in the dramatic adaptation "Fear" (1956) with Ingrid Bergman. Rossellini continued to exercise his talent in the sixties through the eighties, taking on a mix of projects like "I Tartari" (1960), "Vanina Vanini" (1961) starring Sandra Milo and "Love at Twenty" with Jean-Pierre Léaud (1962). His credits also expanded to "La Pelle" with Marcello Mastroianni (1981) and "Nostalghia" (1983). Rossellini most recently produced "Sweet Dreams" (1991).

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Flowers Of St. Francis, The (1950) - Make Me An Instrument Of Your Peace The first meeting between Francis (Nazario Girardi) and the man who will become "Giovanni the Simpleton" (Peparuolo) from Roberto Rossellini's The Flowers Of St. Francis, 1950.
Flowers Of St. Francis, The (1950) - Such Severe Penance Cinematographer Otello Martelli capturing interesting forms in the rain, as Francis (Nazario Girardi) laments misleading his monks, in Roberto Rossellini's Flowers of St. Francis, 1950.
Flowers Of St. Francis, The (1950) - Here Is Francis... The first appearance of Francis (Nazario Girardi) and his followers, narration by Gianfranco Bellini, from a screenplay by Federico Fellini and director Roberto Rossellini, in Flowers of St. Francis, 1950.
Flowers Of St. Francis, The (1950) - Opening, Prologue Elaborate credits and attribution, with prologue as narrated by Gianfranco Bellini, opening Roberto Rossellini's Flowers of St. Francis, 1950, with a cast of non-professionals, co-written with Federico Fellini.
Flowers Of St. Francis, The (1950) - Sister Clare Is Coming! Francis (Franciscan monk Nazario Girardi, in his only film) with his followers meets St. Clare (Arabella Lemaitre, David Selznick's agent in Italy!) in Roberto Rossellini's Flowers of St. Francis, 1950.
Fear (1954) - She Must Be Punished At the country home of well-to-do Albert (Mathias Wieman) and guilt-stricken, unfaithful Irene (Ingrid Bergman), their daughter (Elisabeth Wischert) is confronted over the theft of the rifle given to her brother (Gabriele Seitz), Bergman's husband Roberto Rossellini directing, in Fear, 1954.
Fear (1954) - Why Should I Be Reasonable? The thoughts of Irene (Ingrid Bergman, wife of the director), wife of a German industrial scientist, making her way through an unnamed city to meet with her lover (Kurt Kreuger) open the last film she made with Roberto Rosselini, the quasi-thriller German-Italian co-production Fear, 1954.
Journey To Italy (1954) - Temple Of The Spirit Now killing time at the near-Naples villa inherited from his ex-pat uncle, disharmonious couple Alex (George Sanders) and Katherine (Ingrid Bergman, married at the time to the director) have another chilly exchange, in Roberto Rossellini's Journey To Italy, 1954.
Journey To Italy (1954) - The Lovely Judy Staying near Naples where they've come to sell an inherited property, English Alex (George Sanders) and wife Katherine (Ingrid Bergman, the director's then-wife) run into friends, tensions soon revealed, early in Roberto Rossellini's Journey To Italy, 1954.
Open City (1946) - He's Doesn't Always Sleep Here Opening scenes from director Roberto Rossellini, shot on location in Rome, Italian resistance leader Manfredi (Marcello Pagliero) hiding from German troops, from Open City, 1946.
Open City (1946) - Wait For Your Pastries In Heaven Citizens of occupied Rome raiding the bakery, the first scene for Anna Magnani (as "Pina"), who then meets resistance leader Manfredi (Marcello Pagliero), early in Roberto Rosssellini's Open City, 1946.
Machine That Kills Bad People, The - This Is A Godsend! Celestino (Gennaro Pisano), now convinced that his camera kills, rushes to tell the priest (Giacomo Furia) who is more interested in the millions provided to the town council, as a result of the camera's earlier mischief, in Roberto Rossellini's The Machine That Kills Bad People, 1952.

Bibliography