Anne Revere


Actor
Anne Revere

About

Also Known As
Ann Revere
Birth Place
New York City, New York, USA
Born
June 25, 1903
Died
December 18, 1990
Cause of Death
Pneumonia

Biography

Character actress from the stage who specialized in portraying morally upright mothers. Plain, if slightly severe-looking, Revere hit her stride during the 1940s when she won an Oscar as Elizabeth Taylor's wise mother in "National Velvet" (1944), she was also nominated for Academy Awards as the mother of Jennifer Jones in "The Song of Bernadette" (1943), and Gregory Peck in "Gentleman's ...

Family & Companions

Samuel Rosen
Husband
Stage director. Married April 11, 1935 until his death in 1984.

Notes

"Nobody went to jail because they were Communists. They went to jail for contempt. But the awful thing about the whole bloody era was that whether you answered or didn't, cooperated or not, you were dead in the business."--Anne Revere in 1975 interview.

Biography

Character actress from the stage who specialized in portraying morally upright mothers. Plain, if slightly severe-looking, Revere hit her stride during the 1940s when she won an Oscar as Elizabeth Taylor's wise mother in "National Velvet" (1944), she was also nominated for Academy Awards as the mother of Jennifer Jones in "The Song of Bernadette" (1943), and Gregory Peck in "Gentleman's Agreement" (1947).

Perhaps her most representative role was as John Garfield's mother and conscience in Robert Rossen's moral indictment of the American dream, "Body and Soul" (1947). Among several who worked on the film, Revere was blacklisted by the industry for refusing to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1951. After playing Montgomery Clift's Salvation Army mother in "A Place in the Sun" (1951), a role that reputedly was substantially cut as a result of her blacklisting, Revere's film career virtually ended. She returned to the stage, winning a Tony Award in 1960 for her performance in Lillian Hellman's "Toys in the Attic" and began acting on TV in 1962. After an absence of 19 years, she returned to the big screen in "Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon" (1970).

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

Birch Interval (1976)
Two For the Money (1972)
Mrs Gap
Macho Callahan (1970)
Crystal
Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon (1970)
Miss Farber
A Place in the Sun (1951)
Hannah Eastman
The Great Missouri Raid (1951)
Mrs. Samuels
You're My Everything (1949)
Aunt Jane
Secret Beyond the Door (1948)
Caroline ["Carey"] Lamphere
Scudda Hoo! Scudda Hay! (1948)
Judith Dominy
Deep Waters (1948)
Mary McKay
Gentleman's Agreement (1948)
Mrs. Green
Forever Amber (1947)
Mother Red Cap
The Shocking Miss Pilgrim (1947)
Alice Pritchard
Body and Soul (1947)
Anna Davis
Carnival in Costa Rica (1947)
Elsa Molina
Dragonwyck (1946)
Abigail Wells
The Keys of the Kingdom (1945)
Agnes Fiske
The Song of Bernadette (1945)
Louise Soubirous
National Velvet (1945)
Mrs. Brown
Fallen Angel (1945)
Clara Mills
The Thin Man Goes Home (1945)
Crazy Mary
Don Juan Quilligan (1945)
Mrs. Cora Rostigaff
Standing Room Only (1944)
Major Cromwell
Rainbow Island (1944)
Queen Okalana
Sunday Dinner for a Soldier (1944)
Agatha Butterfield
Star Spangled Rhythm (1943)
Sarah
The Meanest Man in the World (1943)
Miss Crockett
Shantytown (1943)
Bessie Gorty
Old Acquaintance (1943)
Belle Carter
The Gay Sisters (1942)
Ida Orner
Are Husbands Necessary? (1942)
Anna
The Falcon Takes Over (1942)
Jessie Florian
Remember the Day (1942)
Miss Price
Meet the Stewarts (1942)
Geraldine Stewart
H. M. Pulham, Esq. (1941)
Miss Redfern
The Flame of New Orleans (1941)
Sister
Design for Scandal (1941)
Nettie, the maid
The Devil Commands (1941)
Mrs. Walters
Men of Boys Town (1941)
Mrs. Feneley
One Crowded Night (1940)
Mae
Double Door (1934)
Caroline Van Brett, her sister

Cast (Short)

Screen Actors (1950)
Herself

Life Events

1934

Film debut, "Double Door"

1934

Broadway debut, "The Children's Hour"

1950

Last film before being blacklisted, "A Place in the Sun"

1951

Refused to testify before HUAC

1962

First appeared on TV in "The Edge of Night"

1970

First film after being blacklisted, "Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon"

Photo Collections

Old Acquaintance - Scene Stills
Here are a number of scene stills from Warner Bros' Old Acquaintance (1943), starring Bette Davis, Miriam Hopkins, and Gig Young.

Videos

Movie Clip

Gentleman's Agreement (1948) -- I Don't Care About The Jews Much talked about but just introduced Dave (John Garfield), a lifelong Jewish pal of writer Phil (Gregory Peck), now in New York after a tour abroad, hears about his friend's unorthodox approach to his assignment, Anne Revere the mom, in Gentleman's Agreement, 1948.
Song Of Bernadette, The (1945) - If You Go Early Little dialogue in director Henry King's opening, Jennifer Jones (as "Bernadette") makes her official movie debut asleep, mother and father (Anne Revere, Roman Bohnen) fighting poverty in 19th century France, in The Song Of Bernadette, 1945.
Gentleman's Agreement (1948) -- Indifference, Outrage, Contempt Wrapping up a call with his new gal (Dorothy McGuire), writer Phil (Gregory Peck), with his helpful mom (Anne Revere), struggles to find an angle for the anti-Semitism story he's been assigned by his new magazine, in Elia Kazan's Gentleman's Agreement, 1948.
Devil Commands, The (1941) - You'll Be Well Paid Lame-brained aide Karl (Ralph Penney) has led Dr. Blair (Boris Karloff) to meet medium Mrs. Walters (Anne Revere), whom he exposes as a fraud, then recruits, in The Devil Commands, 1941.
Devil Commands, The (1941) - Open, My Father's House Opening credits and excellent narration by Amanda Duff (as "Anne Blair") introducing her father (Boris Karloff) and his problems, in Edward Dmytryk's The Devil Commands, 1941.
Devil Commands, The (1941) - Mrs. Marcy Nosy housekeeper Mrs. Marcy (Dorothy Adams) discovers the excellent work being done by Dr. Blair (Boris Karloff), Karl (Ralph Penney) and Mrs. Walters (Anne Revere) in The Devil Commands, 1941.

Trailer

Gentleman's Agreement - (Academy Award trailer) Three Academy Awards went to Gentleman's Agreement (1947) an exposé of American anti-semitism starring Gregory Peck and John Garfield, directed by Elia Kazan.
Dragonwyck - (Original Trailer) A farm girl (Gene Tierney) signs on as governess in a gloomy mansion in Dragonwyck (1946).
Gay Sisters, The - (Original Trailer) Barbara Stanwyck marries a real estate man to save her family's mansion only to discover he's after it as well in The Gay Sisters (1942).
Thin Man Goes Home, The --(Original Trailer) On a trip to visit his parents, detective Nick Charles gets mixed up in a murder investigation in The Thin Man Goes Home (1944).
Design For Scandal -- (Original Trailer) Walter Pidgeon is a reporter assigned to dig up dirt on lady judge Rosalind Russell in Design For Scandal (1941).
National Velvet - (Original Trailer) A British farm girl fights to train a difficult horse for the Grand National Steeplechase in National Velvet (1944), starring Elizabeth Taylor and Mickey Rooney.
Old Acquaintance - (Original Trailer) Two writers, friends since childhood, fight over their books and lives in Old Acquaintance (1943) starring Bette Davis.
Song Of Bernadette, The - (Re-issue trailer) Jennifer Jones won a Best Actress Oscar for her first starring role in The Song Of Bernadette (1943), playing a French girl who has a vision of the Virgin Mary.
Place in the Sun, A - (Original Trailer) Montgomery Clift and ELizabeth Taylor star in A Place in the Sun, an adaptation of the Theodore Dreiser novel. An American Tragedy.
Fallen Angel - (Original Trailer) A man (Dana Andrews) is accused of killing a waitress he had tried to seduce with his wife's money in Fallen Angel (1945).
Men of Boys Town -- (Original Trailer) Father Flanagan (Spencer Tracy) continues to fight for his pioneering orphanage in the sequel to Boys Town (1938), Men Of Boys Town (1941).

Family

Clinton Revere
Father
Stockbroker.

Companions

Samuel Rosen
Husband
Stage director. Married April 11, 1935 until his death in 1984.

Bibliography

Notes

"Nobody went to jail because they were Communists. They went to jail for contempt. But the awful thing about the whole bloody era was that whether you answered or didn't, cooperated or not, you were dead in the business."--Anne Revere in 1975 interview.