Michael Reed


Biography

Michael Reed is best known as a frequent collaborator on the iconic Hammer B-movie horror films, such as "Dracula: Prince of Darkness" and "The Gorgon." The Hammer films were often mocked for their contrived storylines and clunky dialogue (as Dracula, Christopher Lee opted to perform an entirely silent role after reading the reportedly dreadful script!). However, critics lauded Michael R...

Biography

Michael Reed is best known as a frequent collaborator on the iconic Hammer B-movie horror films, such as "Dracula: Prince of Darkness" and "The Gorgon." The Hammer films were often mocked for their contrived storylines and clunky dialogue (as Dracula, Christopher Lee opted to perform an entirely silent role after reading the reportedly dreadful script!). However, critics lauded Michael Reed's atmospheric photography, especially given his budgetary constraints. Reed got to display his signature style in the much more commercially successful "On Her Majesty's Secret Service," the sixth film in the Bond franchise. Again, while some critics had issues with the movie (George Lazenby's casting, for one), they reserved their praise for Reed's cinematography. In no small part due to Reed's unique approach, many fans and critics alike consider "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" to be one of the best Bond films, even despite Sean Connery's conspicuous absence. Indeed, Reed's calculated use of darkness, which evoked his earlier work in the horror genre, lent the film a level of realism and gravitas unprecedented in the Bond series. That same moody tone was apparent in his later work for the TV series "Philip Marlowe, Private Eye." Based on Raymond Chandler's noir-ish novels about a private detective, the series made good use of Reed's penchant for gloomy and foreboding photography.

Filmography

 

Cinematography (Feature Film)

Loophole (1986)
Director Of Photography
Wild Geese II (1985)
Director Of Photography
Kim (1984)
Director Of Photography
The Passage (1979)
Director Of Photography
No Longer Alone (1978)
Director Of Photography
The Stick Up (1978)
Cinematographer
Shout at the Devil (1976)
Director Of Photography
The Hiding Place (1975)
Director Of Photography
Galileo (1974)
Director Of Photography
The Hireling (1973)
Director Of Photography
Ghost in the Noonday Sun (1973)
Director Of Photography
The Groundstar Conspiracy (1972)
Director of Photography
Z.P.G. (1972)
Director of Photography
Von Richthofen and Brown (1971)
Director of Photography
The McKenzie Break (1970)
Director of Photography
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969)
Director of Photography
S--x by Advertisement (1969)
Stills
Two a Penny (1968)
Director of Photography
The Malpas Mystery (1967)
Director of Photography
Prehistoric Women (1967)
Director of Photography
Rasputin--The Mad Monk (1966)
Director of Photography
Dracula--Prince of Darkness (1966)
Director of Photography
The Pleasure Girls (1966)
Director of Photography
The Fast Lady (1965)
Director of Photographer 2nd unit
The Gorgon (1965)
Director of Photography
The Moon-Spinners (1964)
Addl Photographer
The Devil-Ship Pirates (1964)
Director of Photography
The Three Lives of Thomasina (1963)
Director of Photographer, 2d unit
My Bare Lady (1963)
Director of Photography
The Traitors (1963)
Lighting Camera
In Search of the Castaways (1962)
Addl Photographer

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

Moving Target (1988)
Production Assistant
Scandalous (1984)
Photography

Title Design (Feature Film)

Scandalous (1984)
Titles

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Shout at the Devil (1976)
Dp/Cinematographer

Music (Special)

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (2000)
Music
Andrew Lloyd Webber 50th Birthday Celebration (1999)
Music Supervisor/ Director

Misc. Crew (TV Mini-Series)

Gore Vidal's Lincoln (1988)
Office Assistant

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Gorgon, The (1964) - They're Bringing The Body In Now After the murder of an artists’ model in some Carpathian forest, we meet Peter Cushing as the local scientist-doctor, Barbara Shelley his assistant, Patrick Troughton the policeman, and Jack Watson as Ratoff, then the weird discovery, early in Hammer Films’ The Gorgon, 1964.
Gorgon, The (1964) - We Are Men Of Science Increasingly emotional assistant Carla (Barbara Shelley) can’t see why doctor Namaroff (Peter Cushing) won’t discuss the spooky Greek-myth angle (i.e. corpses turned to stone) on the local murders, then a victim’s father (Michael Goodliffe), a former colleague, presses a similar point, in Hammer Films’ The Gorgon, 1964.
Gorgon, The (1964) - It's Not A Pretty Sight His hair turned gray after his encounter with the title monster (whose dead victims turn to stone), Heitz (Richard Pasco) receives his mentor and family friend Meister (Christopher Lee) from Leipzig, while Namaroff (Peter Cushing) slices up an ex-patient, with his still-more remote assistant Carla (Barbara Shelley), in Hammer Films’ The Gorgon, 1964.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - A Location Fix On Double-O-Seven M and Q and Moneypenny (Bernard Lee, Desmond Llewelyn and Lois Maxwell) express concern about 007, then we find him (George Lazenby, the first-ever new James Bond, in his Aston-Martin) pursuing Diana Rigg (as Teresa “Tracy” Draco in a Mercury) on the Portugese coast, opening On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - Do Not Kill Me, Mr. Bond Abducted from a Portugese seaside resort by thugs reporting to European union-syndicate godfather Marc-Ange Draco (Gabriele Ferzetti), whose daughter (Diana Rigg) is his latest conquest, Bond (George Lazenby, in his first and only appearance as 007) frees himself to make inquiries, in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - I Suspect They're Trying To Kill Me His false identity blown, trying to evade Blofeld’s thugs (Ilse Steppat et al), James Bond (George Lazenby) sneaks about the carnival at Lauterbrunnen (more precisley, Murren-Schilthorn, Switzerland), when he’s rescued by Tracy (a.k.a. Contessa Teresa, Diana Rigg), whom we haven’t seen for ages, in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - Teresa Was A Saint On the evening following their mysterious opening encounter on the beach, George Lazenby as James Bond (establishing himself with some baccarat chemin-de-fer in his first appearance in the role) again gets to rescue Diana Rigg as Teresa or, as she’ll explain, Tracy, in the sixth 007 feature, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - You Never Do Anything With Me On his first trip to HQ in London in his only appearance as James Bond, George Lazenby nails the hat-toss, jousts with Moneypenny (Lois Maxwell) and M (Bernard Lee), and reaches an excellent outcome, and an opportunity to pursue Blofeld, in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - A Well-Known Congenital Distinction Complexity as Bond (George Lazenby), escorted by Yuri Borienko deeper into the secret Swiss Alpine lair, knows he’s visiting the real Blofeld (Telly Savalas), who doesn’t yet know Bond isn’t the real genealogist Sir Hilary, come to consider his claim to a French noble title, in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
Dracula, Prince Of Darkness (1966) - Luxury Of A Warm Posterior Some foreboding, as bothered Abbot Shandor (Andrew Keir) comes upon English tourists (Barbara Shelley, Francis Matthews, Charles Tingwell, Suzan Farmer) in a Carpathian pub, early in Hammer Films' Dracula, Prince Of Darkness, 1966.
Dracula, Prince Of Darkness - Your Husband... Servant Klove (Philip Latham) sprinkles his master's ashes with the blood of a house-guest, fetches his wife Helen (Barbara Shelley) at which point the star (Christopher Lee) finally appears, in Hammer Films' Dracula, Prince Of Darkness, 1966.
Our Man In Marrakesh (1966) - I Have No Luggage! Arrived at the hotel, observed by spooky Klaus Kinski, Tony Randall, who may really be a tourist, and Senta Berger, whom we suspect is an agent, soon finding the guy murdered in the opening, in the spy comedy Our Man In Marrakesh a.k.a. Bang! Bang! You're Dead

Trailer

Bibliography