Harry Rapf


Executive, Producer

Biography

Filmography

 

Producer (Feature Film)

Scene of the Crime (1949)
Producer
Gallant Bess (1947)
Producer
Lost Angel (1944)
Executive Producer
Swing Fever (1944)
Executive Producer
The Youngest Profession (1943)
Executive Producer
Lassie Come Home (1943)
Executive Producer
Joe Smith, American (1942)
Executive Producer
Forty Little Mothers (1940)
Producer
Henry Goes Arizona (1939)
Producer
Burn 'Em Up O'Connor (1939)
Producer
The Ice Follies of 1939 (1939)
Producer
Let Freedom Ring (1939)
Producer
Stablemates (1938)
Producer
Everybody Sing (1938)
Producer
The Girl Downstairs (1938)
Producer
The Bad Man of Brimstone (1937)
Producer
They Gave Him a Gun (1937)
Producer
Thoroughbreds Don't Cry (1937)
Producer
Espionage (1937)
Producer
The Good Old Soak (1937)
Producer
Live, Love and Learn (1937)
Producer
We Went to College (1936)
Producer
Old Hutch (1936)
Producer
Tough Guy (1936)
Producer
Three Wise Guys (1936)
Producer
Piccadilly Jim (1936)
Producer
Mad Holiday (1936)
Producer
It's in the Air (1935)
Producer
The Perfect Gentleman (1935)
Producer
Murder Man (1935)
Producer
Whipsaw (1935)
Producer
The Night Is Young (1935)
Producer
A Wicked Woman (1934)
Producer
Hollywood Party (1934)
Producer
Looking Forward (1933)
Associate Producer
Tugboat Annie (1933)
Associate Producer
Turn Back the Clock (1933)
Associate Producer
Broadway to Hollywood (1933)
Associate Producer
The Chief (1933)
Producer
Christopher Bean (1933)
Associate Producer
New Morals for Old (1932)
Producer
Lovers Courageous (1932)
Producer
Divorce in the Family (1932)
Producer
Emma (1932)
Producer
The Champ (1931)
Producer
The Man in Possession (1931)
Producer
A Tailor Made Man (1931)
Producer
Possessed (1931)
Producer
New Adventures of Get Rich Quick Wallingford (1931)
Producer
Never the Twain Shall Meet (1931)
Supervisor
Gentleman's Fate (1931)
Supervisor
The Sin of Madelon Claudet (1931)
Supervisor
The Hollywood Revue of 1929 (1929)
Producer
So This Is Marriage (1924)
Supervisor
Brass (1923)
Producer
Heroes of the Street (1922)
Producer
Your Best Friend (1922)
Producer
Rags to Riches (1922)
Producer
Why Girls Leave Home (1921)
Producer
School Days (1921)
Supervisor
The Greatest Love (1920)
Supervisor
The Invisible Divorce (1920)
Supervisor
Blind Youth (1920)
Manager of prod
The Accidental Honeymoon (1918)
Producer
Wanted for Murder (1918)
Producer
The Struggle Everlasting (1918)
Presented By
To-Day (1917)
Producer
The Argyle Case (1917)
Presented By
The Mad Lover (1917)
Presented By
One Hour (1917)
Producer

Cast (Short)

The Candid Camera Story (Very Candid) of the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures 1937 Convention (1936)
Himself
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 1925 Studio Tour (1925)
Himself

Producer (Short)

Hollywood Party (1937)
Producer (Uncredited)
Donkey Baseball (1935)
Producer
Trained Hoofs (1935)
Producer
How to Sleep (1935)
Executive Producer

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Scene Of The Crime (1949) - Stop Tossing That Gun Around Opening with a straight-up murder, characters not identified (G. Pat Collins plays the victim whom, we’ll learn, is a plainclothes cop), we then meet cover-girl Gloria (Arlene Dahl) and her husband, cop Mike Conovan (Van Johnson), about to celebrate their anniversary, in the rare MGM-Noir, Scene Of The Crime, 1949.
Scene Of The Crime (1949) - If You Never Try To Stop L-A cop Conovan (Van Johnson) chasing a lead, explains to wife Gloria (Arlene Dahl) then, hardly noticing one performer (Jean Carter) and not revealing himself, earns some time with stripper Lili (Gloria DeHaven, in a role evoking the famous Burlesque entertainer Lili St. Cyr), in MGM’s Scene Of The Crime, 1949.
Murder Man, The (1935) - Very Fatally Dead In the press room at the precinct, crime beat reporters (William Demarest, Bobby Watson, Lucien Littlefield, Fuzzy Knight, and James Stewart as "Shorty") get word of a big time killing, early in The Murder Man, 1935.
Murder Man, The (1935) - Cynical Drunken Bum First appearance for the much sought after murder specialist reporter Steve Grey (Spencer Tracy), returned from a bender and visiting Mary (Virginia Bruce) and Robins (Robert Barrat) in the newsroom, in The Murder Man, 1935.
Murder Man, The (1936) - I'll Be At Sing Sing Advice columnist Mary (Virginia Bruce) drops in on vacationing crime reporter Steve (Spencer Tracy), not realizing Shorty (James Stewart) has arrived in her rumble seat with a message from their editor, in The Murder Man, 1935.
Scene Of The Crime (1949) - Only Fools Bet Horses Three L-A cops (Van Johnson as Mike Conovan, with John McIntire and Tom Drake) investigating a colleague’s murder have followed the car that just picked up a suspect they were watching, to learn that he’s been grabbed by syndicate crook “Umpire” (Tom Powers), looking to set up a larger operation, in Scene Of The Crime, 1949.
Scene Of The Crime (1949) - I'm Such A Stinkin' Crook First with a clever riff on their going-out evening routine, L-A cop Mike Conover (Van Johnson) and his fashion model wife Gloria (Arlene Dahl) are surprised by informant Sleeper (TCM friend and favorite Norman Lloyd), with dope on a series of robberies of bookmakers, in MGM’s Scene Of The Crime, 1949.
Scene Of The Crime (1949) - Never Pick Up A Pigeon Alone Driving around L-A beginning their investigation of a the murder of a fellow plainclothes cop, Van Johnson as Conovan, John McIntire as his mentor-partner Piper, and Tom Drake as young “C.C.,” talk shop and notice lurking “Sleeper” (Norman Lloyd), early in Scene Of The Crime, 1949, from MGM and director Roy Rowland.
Let Freedom Ring (1939) - When Irish Eyes Are Smiling We know now that Steve (Nelson Eddy) is against the railroad, pretending to be pals with drunk-again hired thug Mulligan (Victor McLaglen), using songs to tell slow-witted Mackerel (Charles Butterworth) to get out of town with the printing-press they’ve just stolen, in MGM’s Let Freedom Ring, 1939.
Let Freedom Ring (1939) - There's No Place Like Home It’s not clear what angle Harvard-educated lawyer Steve (Nelson Eddy) is working on his first night back in his Western hometown, buddying up to the railroad labor goon Mulligan (Victor McLaglen), then meeting old pal Mackerel (Charles Butterworth), who works a sucker-punch scam, in Let Freedom Ring, 1939, from an original Ben Hecht screenplay.
Freaks (1932) - Living Breathing Monstrosities In the sometimes forgotten prologue, the barker (Murray Kinnell) lures spectators, then director Tod Browning introduces Hans and Freida (Harry and Daisy Earles) and the already evil-seeming "Cleopatra" (Olga Balaclova), in the eventually influential box-office flop Freaks, 1932.
Freaks (1932) - Wedding Feast Director Tod Browning's famous scene, "Half Boy" Johnny Eck leading cohorts, mocking Cleopatra (Olga Baclanova) at her sham wedding to clueless Hans (Harry Earles), his jilted Daisy (Earles) dejected, her real boyfriend, strong-man Hercules (Henry Victor) being dumb, in Freaks, 1932.

Family

Matthew Rapf
Son
Producer, screenwriter.
Maurice Rapf
Son
Screenwriter.
Joanna Rapf
Granddaughter
Film historian.

Bibliography