Anthony Quinn


Actor
Anthony Quinn

About

Also Known As
Anthony Rudolph Oaxaca Quinn
Birth Place
Chihuahua, MX
Born
April 21, 1915
Died
June 03, 2001
Cause of Death
Respiratory Failure

Biography

The tempestuous screen image of two-time Academy Award winner and Renaissance man Anthony Quinn at times seemed to mirror the prolific actor's much publicized, unquenchable thirst for life. His exotic background enabled him to play a nearly limitless variety of ethnic characters, ranging from Crazy Horse in "They Died with Their Boots On" (1942), to the marauding Mongol warrior in "Attil...

Photos & Videos

Lust for Life - Behind-the-Scenes Stills
Zorba the Greek - Movie Posters
Against All Flags - Movie Posters

Family & Companions

Katherine DeMille
Wife
Actor. Cecil B DeMille's adopted daughter; married on October 2, 1937; divorced in 1965; died on April 27, 1995 at the age of 83; Quinn (by his own account) found out she was not a virgin on their wedding night (Cary Grant, reportedly, had deflowered her) and held it against her the rest of their marriage; the couple co-starred in "Black Gold" (1947), Quinn playing American Indian Charley Eagle.
Yolanda Quinn
Wife
Former costumer. Italian; married in January 1966; met when she worked as a wardrobe asistant on the film "Barabbas" (1961), starring Quinn; separated in February 1995; reached settlement in their divorce in August 1997.
Kathy Benvin
Wife
Secretary. Born c. 1962; mother of Antonia and Ryan Quinn; married on December 7, 1997 in Naples, Florida; resided with Quinn and their children in Bristol, Rhode Island.

Bibliography

"One Man Tango"
Anthony Quinn with Daniel Paisner, HarperCollins (1995)
"Original Sin"
Anthony Quinn, Little, Brown (1972)

Notes

In 1998, the Italo-American Club of Rhode Island named Quinn Man of the Year.

Quinn conceded to The Chicago Tribune (March 31, 1990) that he had received as much as $500,000 for an original piece of artwork but added modestly, "After shipping and paying off the auction house fees, I never made more than $175,000 from one piece."

Biography

The tempestuous screen image of two-time Academy Award winner and Renaissance man Anthony Quinn at times seemed to mirror the prolific actor's much publicized, unquenchable thirst for life. His exotic background enabled him to play a nearly limitless variety of ethnic characters, ranging from Crazy Horse in "They Died with Their Boots On" (1942), to the marauding Mongol warrior in "Attila" (1955), to an Eskimo in "The Savage Innocents" (1961). An accomplished artist and painter in his own right, it came as no surprise when he embraced the role of impressionist Paul Gauguin in "Lust for Life" (1956), a role that won him his second Oscar. It was, however, for his embodiment of the garrulous "Zorba the Greek" (1964) that Quinn would be forever remembered, so perfectly did he capture the free-spirited, unrestrained nature of the irascible character. Incredibly prolific, he continued to work steadily over the decades, appearing in such films as "The Greek Tycoon" (1978) and the telepic adaptation of "Ernest Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea" (NBC, 1990). A man of deep appetites and diverse passions, both in film and in his own life, Anthony Quinn became one of cinema's most beloved and respected actors in a career that spanned nearly 70 years and more than a 150 memorable performances.

Born Antonio Rodolfo Oaxaca Quinn on April 21, 1915 in Chihuahua, Mexico to parents Manuela and Francisco, he was brought to El Paso, TX as an infant, and later moved with the family to the Echo Park area of Los Angeles. Quinn's father, "Frank," who was of Irish-Mexican decent and had ridden with Pancho Villa during the revolution, eventually found work as a cameraman at the Selig motion picture studio prior to his death in 1926. As a youngster, Quinn was irresistibly drawn to the arts, playing saxophone in evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson's orchestra and studying under famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright after winning a design competition. Quinn left high school before graduating in order to help support his family, going to work in a mattress factory and picking up fights as a boxer to earn money, but it was Wright who insisted that the teenager take acting lessons and undergo surgery to cure him of his speech impediment. After studying acting and public speaking as a part of his post-operative speech therapy, Quinn landed his first role in the play "Hay Fever" in 1933. In 1936 he appeared in the theatrical production of "Clean Beds," produced under the auspices of Mae West, and struck up friendships with the likes of John Barrymore and W.C. Fields. Later that same year Quinn was cast in his first credited screen role in the Universal Pictures crime drama "Parole" (1936).

Never a shy one, Quinn made a lasting impression when he had the nerve to stand up to Hollywood icon Cecil B. DeMille after being given his first speaking part as a Cheyenne Indian in "The Plainsman" (1937). As cast and crew looked on in disbelief, the 22-year-old Quinn responded to the most recent of a series of abusive outbursts from the director by telling him how he should shoot the problematic scene and what he could do with his $75 a day salary, if he did not like it. After staring back at the young actor for some time, DeMille announced, "The boy's right. We'll change the set-up," and later said admiringly, "It was one of the most auspicious beginnings for an actor I've ever seen." Quinn would act in two more movies for the directing legend - the seafaring historical epic "The Buccaneer" (1938) and "Union Pacific" (1939), a railroad thriller starring Barbara Stanwyck and Joel McCrea. Not only did Quinn strike up a long-lasting professional relationship with DeMille, but in short order he soon met, courted and married DeMille's daughter, Katherine, with whom he would go on to have five children. Tragically, a sixth child died at the age of two when he drowned in the pool of next door neighbor W.C. Fields.

With the help of Paramount's highest-paid star at the time, Carole Lombard, who provided the novice with advice on how to handle the front office after he had impressed her with a bit part in her hit drama, "Swing High, Swing Low" (1937), Quinn was soon picking up steady work, albeit mostly as Indians or assorted ethnic heavies in productions like "Road to Singapore" (1940) amidst the shenanigans of Bing Crosby, Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour. He impressed with a role in the Tyrone Power vehicle "Blood and Sand" (1941), introducing co-star Rita Hayworth to her future husband, Orson Welles, during the shoot. More strong notices for supporting roles followed in films such as "They Died with Their Boots On" (1941), "The Ox-Bow Incident" (1943), and "Back to Bataan" (1945). However, it would take a return to the stage to raise Quinn's Hollywood stock. He made his Broadway debut in "The Gentleman from Athens" (1947) before director Elia Kazan tapped him as Stanley Kowalski for a lengthy U.S. tour of "A Streetcar Named Desire" (1948-49). Kazan then cast him as Marlon Brando's brother in "Viva Zapata" (1952), for which he earned his first Oscar as Best Supporting Actor. After making the romantic adventure "City Beneath the Sea" (1953), one of three films shot that year with director Budd Boetticher, Quinn traveled to Spain to play Antinous in the epic adaptation of Homer's "Ulysses" (1955), with Kirk Douglas in the title role. He went on to portray an aging bullfighter opposite Maureen O'Hara in Boetticher's "The Magnificent Matador" (1955) before winning his second Best Supporting Actor Academy Award for his embodiment of larger-than-life artist Paul Gauguin in "Lust for Life" (1956), once again starring with Douglas, who played the tortured impressionist painter Vincent Van Gogh.

In the mid-1950s, Quinn moved his family to Italy where he played the brutish, conflicted strongman Zampanò in Frederico Fellini's "La Strada" (1956), the first picture to win the Academy's Best Foreign Language Film award. Finally, after 20 years in the business, he had become a full-fledged box-office star, and the next year would see him garner a Best Actor Oscar nomination for his turn opposite Anna Magnani in "Wild Is the Wind" (1957), as well as following in the prestigious footsteps of Lon Chaney and Charles Laughton as Quasimodo in "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" (1957). Actually shot years earlier, U.S. audiences were finally able to see Quinn portray the continent-conquering Hun in the epic biopic "Attila" (1958). That same year saw the release of Quinn's first, and only, directorial effort, a remake of "The Buccaneer" (1958). Executive produced by De Mille, it would be the studio titan's last project before his death. With his career nearing its zenith, Quinn continued to rack up diverse and challenging roles. He was splendid as an Eskimo hunter in Nicholas Ray's underappreciated docudrama "The Savage Innocents" (1961). In the blockbuster adaptation of Alistair MacLean's action adventure "The Guns of Navarone" (1961), Quinn was suitably stoic as Greek patriot Colonel Andrea Stavros on a deadly mission with Gregory Peck and David Niven.

Quinn gave one of his finest performances in the heart-breaking "Requiem for a Heavyweight" (1962), starring as Mountain Rivera, a retired boxer who enters the humiliating world of staged wrestling in order to save his debt-ridden manager (Jackie Gleason). He was also a standout as the opportunistic Bedouin Auda Abu Tayi in David Lean's "Lawrence of Arabia" (1962) opposite Peter O'Toole in the title role. Quinn next brought humanity to his portrayal of the thief whose life was spared at Christ's crucifixion in the biblical epic "Barabbas" (1962). Then came what would arguably be Quinn's most memorable portrayal, that of the lustful peasant, "Zorba the Greek" (1964). He also served as producer on the film, which told the story of an uptight Englishman (Alan Bates), newly arrived at a village on the island of Crete, who is befriended by Zorba, a gregarious, life-loving everyman. The film was an unqualified success with both audiences and critics, earning Quinn yet another Oscar nomination for Best Actor. Other projects and roles included Kublai Khan in "Marco the Magnificent" (1965), a French officer in "The Lost Command" (1966), a boozy Italian mayor in "The Secret of Santa Vittoria" (1969), and a Native-American fed up with life on the reservation in "Flap" (1970).

Quinn dabbled in episodic TV as the star of "The Man and the City" (ABC, 1971-72), playing the ruggedly independent mayor of a fictional city in the Southwest. He essayed multi-millionaire Theo Tomasis, a fictionalized version of Aristotle Onassis in "The Greek Tycoon" (1978), alongside Jacqueline Bisset as a stand-in for Jackie-O. Quinn revisited "Lawrence of Arabia" territory in "Lion of the Desert" (1981) and led a rag-tag group of revolutionaries-turned-bandits in the action-comedy "High Risk" (1981). Nearly 20 years after the premiere of the film, he reprised "Zorba!" - this time in a 1983 revival of the Broadway musical which reunited him with the film's writer-director Michael Cacoyannis. He earned a Tony nomination for his efforts before touring the U.S. for three years, indelibly imprinting himself as Zorba in the eyes of the public. Later, Quinn portrayed the father of the real world tycoon in "The Richest Man in the World: The Aristotle Onassis Story" (ABC, 1988), for which he received an Emmy nomination. Continuing to work with Hollywood's biggest stars, he appeared opposite Kevin Costner in the melodramatic thriller "Revenge" (1990), in addition to bringing "Ernest Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea" (NBC, 1990) to life in the title role.

Quinn worked alongside fellow screen legend Maureen O'Hara in director Chris Columbus' romantic comedy "Only the Lonely" (1991), starring funnyman John Candy. He had a brief turn in the big-budget action-adventure bomb "Last Action Hero" (1993), starring Arnold Schwarzenegger in a parody of his own screen persona. On TV he was teamed with another icon of cinema, Katharine Hepburn, in the late-bloomer romance "This Can't Be Love" (CBS, 1994). The sheer weight of his legendary presence threatened to overshadow many of the roles being offered to Quinn in his later years. This might have explained his casting as the father of the Greek gods, Zeus, in the made-for-TV movie "Hercules and the Amazon Women" (syndicated, 1994), along with its four sequels over the course of a year. He played a proud and domineering patriarch in the post-WWII romantic drama "A Walk in the Clouds" (1995), in addition to real-life Mafioso Neil Dellacroce in the crime biopic "Gotti" (HBO, 1996) opposite Armand Assante as the "Teflon Don." Quinn's final role before his passing in 2001 was that of murdered mob chieftain Angelo Allieghieri in the Sylvester Stallone thriller "Avenging Angelo" (2002).

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

The Buccaneer (1959)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

The Magic of Fellini (2002)
Himself
Avenging Angelo (2002)
Fellini (2001)
Himself
Oriundi (1999)
Giuseppe Padovani
From Russia to Hollywood: The 100-Year Odyssey of Chekhov and Shdanoff (1999)
Big Guns Talk: The Story of the Western (1997)
Gotti (1996)
Seven Servants (1996)
Old Man Archie
Il Sindaco (1996)
A Walk in the Clouds (1995)
This Can't Be Love (1994)
Michael Reyman
Somebody to Love (1994)
Last Action Hero (1993)
Mobsters (1991)
A Star For Two (1991)
Only The Lonely (1991)
Jungle Fever (1991)
The Old Man and the Sea (1990)
Santiago
Revenge (1990)
Tibey
Ghosts Can't Do It (1990)
Scott
A Man of Passion (1989)
Stradivari (1989)
Antonio Stradivarius
Gregory Peck: His Own Man (1988)
Ingrid (1985)
Himself
The Salamander (1983)
Bruno Manzini
Valentina (1982)
Mosen Joaquin
Lion of the Desert (1981)
High Risk (1981)
The Passage (1979)
The Greek Tycoon (1978)
Caravans (1978)
The Children of Sanchez (1978)
Mohammad Messenger of God (1976)
The Con Artists (1976)
The Inheritance (1976)
Gregorio Ferramonti
The Destructors (1974)
The Don Is Dead (1973)
Deaf Smith And Johnny Ears (1973)
Across 110th Street (1972)
Capt. [Frank] Mattelli
Arruza (1972)
Narrator
The City (1971)
Mayor Thomas Jefferson Alcala
A Walk in the Spring Rain (1970)
Will Cade
Flap (1970)
Flapping Eagle
R. P. M. (1970)
Paco Perez
The Secret of Santa Vittoria (1969)
Italo Bombolini
A Dream of Kings (1969)
Matsoukas
The Magus (1968)
Maurice Conchis
The Shoes of the Fisherman (1968)
Kiril Lakota
Guns for San Sebastian (1968)
León Alastray
The Happening (1967)
Roc Delmonico
The 25th Hour (1967)
Johann Moritz
Marco the Magnificent (1966)
Kublai Khan
Lost Command (1966)
Lieutenant-Colonel Raspeguy
A High Wind in Jamaica (1965)
Juan Chavez
Behold a Pale Horse (1964)
Captain Vinolas
The Visit (1964)
Serge Miller
Zorba the Greek (1964)
Alexis Zorba
Fatal Desire (1963)
Alfio
Barabbas (1962)
Barabbas
Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962)
Mountain Rivera
Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
Auda Abu Tayi
The Guns of Navarone (1961)
Andrea
The Savage Innocents (1961)
Inuk
Portrait in Black (1960)
Dr. David Rivera
Heller in Pink Tights (1960)
Tom Healy
Last Train from Gun Hill (1959)
Craig Belden
Warlock (1959)
Tom Morgan
The Black Orchid (1959)
Frank Valente
Hot Spell (1958)
John Henry Duval
Wild Is the Wind (1958)
Gino
Attila (1958)
The Ride Back (1957)
Roberto Kallen
The River's Edge (1957)
Ben Cameron
The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (1957)
Quasimodo
Man from Del Rio (1956)
David Robles
Lust for Life (1956)
Paul Gauguin
The Wild Party (1956)
"Big Tom" Kupfen
Donne Proibite (1956)
Seven Cities of Gold (1955)
Don Gaspar de Portola
The Magnificent Matador (1955)
Luis Santos
Ulysses (1955)
Antinous
The Naked Street (1955)
Phil Regal
The Beachcomber (1955)
Ship'S Captain
The Long Wait (1954)
Johnny McBride
La Strada (1954)
Zampano
City Beneath the Sea (1953)
Tony Bartlett
Blowing Wild (1953)
Paco Conway
East of Sumatra (1953)
Kiang
Ride, Vaquero! (1953)
Jose Esqueda
Seminole (1953)
Osceola [previously known as John Powell]
The World in His Arms (1952)
Portugee
Viva Zapata! (1952)
Eufemio [Zapata]
The Brigand (1952)
Prince Ramon
Against All Flags (1952)
Roc Brasiliano
The Brave Bulls (1951)
Raul Fuentes
Mask of the Avenger (1951)
Viovanni Larocca
California (1947)
Don Luis Rivera y Hernandez
Tycoon (1947)
Ricky [Vegas]
Black Gold (1947)
Charley Eagle
Sinbad the Sailor (1947)
Emir [of Daibul]
The Imperfect Lady (1947)
Jose Martinez
Back to Bataan (1945)
Captain Andreas Bonifacio
China Sky (1945)
Chen Ta
Where Do We Go from Here? (1945)
Chief Badger
Buffalo Bill (1944)
Yellow Hand
Ladies of Washington (1944)
Michael Romanescue
Irish Eyes Are Smiling (1944)
Al Jackson
Roger Touhy, Gangster (1944)
George Carroll
Guadalcanal Diary (1943)
Jesus "Soose" Alvarez
The Ox-Bow Incident (1943)
Francisco Morez
They Died with Their Boots On (1942)
Crazy Horse
The Black Swan (1942)
Wogan
Road to Morocco (1942)
Mullay Kasim
Larceny, Inc. (1942)
Leo Dexter
Thieves Fall Out (1941)
Chick Collins
Bullets for O'Hara (1941)
Tony Van Dyne
Knockout (1941)
Trego
Blood and Sand (1941)
Manolo de Palma
The Perfect Snob (1941)
Alex Moreno
City for Conquest (1940)
Murray Burns
Texas Rangers Ride Again (1940)
Joe Yuma
The Ghost Breakers (1940)
Ramon Mederos/Francisco Mederos
Parole Fixer (1940)
Frances "Big Boy" Bradmore
Road to Singapore (1940)
Caesar
Emergency Squad (1940)
Nick Buller
Union Pacific (1939)
Jack Cordray
Television Spy (1939)
Forbes
King of Chinatown (1939)
Mike Gordon
Island of Lost Men (1939)
Chang Tai
The Buccaneer (1938)
Beluche
Bulldog Drummond in Africa (1938)
Deane Fordine
Tip-Off Girls (1938)
Marty
Dangerous to Know (1938)
Nicolai [Nicky] Kusnoff
Daughter of Shanghai (1938)
Harry Morgan
King of Alcatraz (1938)
Lou Gedney
Hunted Men (1938)
Mac
Swing High, Swing Low (1937)
The Don
The Last Train from Madrid (1937)
Captain Ricardo Alvarez
Waikiki Wedding (1937)
Kimo
Partners in Crime (1937)
Nicholas Mazaney
The Plainsman (1937)
A Cheyenne indian
Sworn Enemy (1936)
Gangster
Parole! (1936)
Zingo [Browning]
Night Waitress (1936)

Producer (Feature Film)

Mystique (1981)
Executive Producer
Across 110th Street (1972)
Executive Producer
The Visit (1964)
Producer
Zorba the Greek (1964)
Associate Producer

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Fellini (2001)
Other
Ingrid (1985)
Other

Cast (Special)

Jackie Gleason: The Great One (2001)
Interviewee
Jack Palance: From Grit to Grace (2001)
SAG Awards Show (2000)
Performer
Maureen O'Hara: Wild Irish Rose (2000)
Hispanic Heritage Awards (2000)
The Fine Art of Separating People From Their Money (1999)
Henry Fonda: Hollywood's Quiet Hero (1997)
Frank Costello: Prime Minister of the Mob (1997)
Interviewee
Sophia Loren: Actress Italian Style (1997)
The Golden Globe's 50th Anniversary Celebration (1994)
The 20th International Emmy Awards (1992)
Presenter
The 48th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1991)
Presenter
The 45th Annual Tony Awards (1991)
Performer
Anthony Quinn (1990)
Let Me Hear You Whisper (1990)
Host ("American Playwrights Theatre")
27 Wagons Full of Cotton (1990)
The Rope (1989)
Host ("American Playwrights Theatre")
Third and Oak: The Pool Hall (1989)
The American Film Institute Salute to Gregory Peck (1989)
Performer
Bill Cosby Salutes Alvin Ailey (1989)
Remembering Bing (1987)
Golden Globe Awards (1987)
Performer
The 59th Annual Academy Awards Presentation (1987)
Performer
The 38th Annual Tony Awards (1984)
Performer
Salute to Lady Liberty (1984)

Cast (Short)

San Sebastian 1746 in 1968 (1968)
Himself
DARKNESS INTO LIGHT (1956)
Himself

Cast (TV Mini-Series)

Hercules In The Underworld (1994)
Hercules And The Circle Of Fire (1994)
Hercules In The Maze Of The Minotaur (1994)
Hercules And The Amazon Women (1994)
Hercules And The Lost Kingdom (1994)
The Richest Man in the World: The Story of Aristotle Onassis (1988)
Socrates Onassis
Jesus of Nazareth (Do Not Use) (1977)

Life Events

1936

Made his feature acting debut in "Parole"

1936

Cast as an extra in Leo McCarey's "The Milky Way"

1936

Spoofed John Barrymore in a stage production of "Clean Beds"

1937

Played a Cheyenne Indian in Cecil B. DeMille's "The Plainsman"

1938

Co-starred in DeMille's "The Buccaneer"

1939

Last association with DeMille as director, "Union Pacific"

1940

Co-starred in "The Road to Singapore," with Bob Hope, Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour

1941

Acted the part of Crazy Horse in Raoul Walsh's "They Died With Their Boots On"

1941

First association with Budd Boetticher (who served as assistant director), "Blood and Sand"

1942

Re-teamed with Hope, Crosby and Lamour for "The Road to Morocco"

1943

First film with director William Wellman, "The Ox-Bow Incident"

1944

Another turn as an Indian (Yellow Hand) in Wellman's "Buffalo Bill"

1945

Co-starred with John Wayne in Edward Dmytryk's "Back to Bataan"

1947

Made his Broadway debut in "The Gentleman from Athens"

1948

Headlined a national tour of "A Streetcar Named Desire," playing Stanley Kowalski opposite Uta Hagen

1950

Reprised the role of Stanley in the Broadway production of "A Streetcar Named Desire"

1952

Won first Best Supporting Actor Oscar playing opposite Marlon Brando in Elia Kazan's "Viva Zapata!"

1954

Played a brutish strongman in Federico Fellini's "La strada," opposite Giulietta Masina

1955

First film opposite Sophia Loren, "Attila"

1956

Earned second Best Supporting Actor Oscar for "Lust for Life"

1957

Earned a Best Actor Oscar nomination for George Cukor's "Wild Is the Wind"

1957

Played Quasimodo in the remake of "The Hunchback of Notre Dame"

1958

Directed first (and only) feature, the remake of "The Buccaneer"

1959

Re-teamed with Sophia Loren in "The Black Orchid"

1960

Returned to Broadway as Henry II in "Beckett"; later switched roles with Laurence Olivier, taking over the cleric's role

1960

Third film with Loren, Cukor's "Heller in Pink Tights"

1960

Gave remarkable performance as a native Eskimo in Nicholas Ray's "Savage Innocents"

1961

Played Greek patriot Colonel Andrea Stavros in J. Lee Thompson's "The Guns of Navaronne"

1962

Acted the part of a used-up boxer in "Requiem for a Heavyweight"

1962

Portrayed opportunistic Bedouin Auda Abu Tayi in David Lean's "Lawrence of Arabia"

1964

Played the title role in "Zorba the Greek"; also first film as a producer

1966

Starred in Mark Robson's "Lost Command"

1968

Played Russian Pope Kiril Lakota in "The Shoes of the Fisherman"

1969

Acted with Anna Magnani in Stanley Kramer's "The Secret of Santa Vittoria"

1969

Co-starred with Irene Papas in "A Dream of Kings"

1970

Portrayed an Indian outcast in Carol Reed's "Flap"

1971

Debut as a series regular, playing the mayor of a fast-growing city in ABC's "The Man and the City"

1972

Produced and acted in "Across 110th Street"

1977

First acting role in a miniseries, Franco Zeffirelli's "Jesus of Nazareth" (NBC)

1978

Acted the part of Theo Tomasis (a thinly disguised Aristotle Onassis) in J. Lee Thompson's "The Greek Tycoon"

1979

Re-teamed with Thompson for "The Passage"

1982

Played the real-life Bedouin leader Omar Mukhtar in "Lion of the Desert"

1983

Reprised his most famous role, playing Zorba the Greek for the revival of the Kander and Ebb musical, "Zorba"

1988

Earned an Emmy nomination for "The Richest Man in the World: The Story of Aristotle Onassis"

1989

Starred as Antonio Stradavarius in "Stradivari"

1990

Portrayed Santiago in the NBC movie remake of "The Old Man and the Sea"

1990

Played a powerful Mexican crime boss, opposite Kevin Costner, in "Revenge"

1991

Acted opposite Maureen O'Hara in "Only the Lonely"

1991

Appeared in Spike Lee's "Jungle Fever"

1994

Cast as the father of the Greek gods, Zeus, in the syndicated TV movie, "Hercules and the Amazon Women"; also appeared in four sequels over the course of a year

1995

Portrayed gregarious patriarch Don Pedro in "A Walk in the Clouds"

1996

Portrayed Mafioso Neil Dellacroce in HBO's "Gotti"

2001

Final screen appearance, cast as murdered mob chieftain Angelo Allieghieri in "Avenging Angelo"; film released posthumously

Photo Collections

Lust for Life - Behind-the-Scenes Stills
Here are several stills taken behind-the-scenes during production of Lust for Life (1956), starring Kirk Douglas and directed by Vincente Minnelli.
Zorba the Greek - Movie Posters
Here are two styles of American one-sheet movie posters for Zorba the Greek (1964), starring Anthony Quinn. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Against All Flags - Movie Posters
Against All Flags - Movie Posters
Guns for San Sebastian - Movie Poster
Guns for San Sebastian - Movie Poster
China Sky - Lobby Cards
Here are several Lobby Cards from RKO's China Sky (1945), starring Randolph Scott, Ruth Warrick, and Ellen Drew. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Blood and Sand (1941) - Lobby Cards
Here are several lobby cards from the 1941 version of Blood and Sand, starring Tyrone Power, Rita Hayworth, Linda Darnell and Anthony Quinn. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
The Guns of Navarone - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for Fox's The Guns of Navarone (1961), starring Gregory Peck, David Niven, and Anthony Quinn. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Heller in Pink Tights - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for Paramount's Heller in Pink Tights (1960), starring Sophia Loren and Anthony Quinn. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Back to Bataan - Publicity Stills
Here are a few photos taken to help publicize Back to Bataan (1945), starring John Wayne and Anthony Quinn. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
The Savage Innocents - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for The Savage Innocents (1961), starring Anthony Quinn. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Back to Bataan - Movie Posters
Here are a few original release American movie posters from RKO's Back to Bataan (1945), starring John Wayne.

Videos

Movie Clip

La Strada (1954) — (Movie Clip) The Fool Will Perform Innocent Gelsomina (Giulietta Masina, directed by her husband Federico Fellini) has run away from her employer/owner (barnstorming entertainer Zampano, Anthony Quinn) and wandered into a nearby town where she sees a Catholic festival, then one of his rivals (Richard Basehart as “Il Matto,” or “The Fool”), in the worldwide hit La Strada, 1954.
La Strada (1954) - Restoration, Opening Opening credit sequence for Federico Fellini's first international hit, La Strada, 1954, starring his wife Giuletta Masina, Anthony Quinn and Richard Basehart, from the new restoration by The Film Foundation, The Criterion Collection and The Hollywood Foreign Press Association.
La Strada (1954) -- What A Man! Directed by her husband Federico Fellini, country-girl Gelsomina (Giulietta Masina) at her first restaurant dinner with intoxicated roustabout strong-man Zampano (Anthony Quinn), who in-effect purchased her from her impoverished mother, and who soon becomes more interested in the barmaid (Anna Primula), in La Strada, 1954.
La Strada (1954) - Here He Is, Zampano! On their first day together, traveling entertainer Zampano (Anthony Quinn) discovers Gelsomina (Giulietta Masina, the director's wife), the assistant he's basically purchased, can't cook, and offers some instruction on performance, in Federico Fellini's La Strada, 1954.
La Strada - (1954) She'll Do What She's Told Opening scene in which Gelsomina (Giulietta Masina) is sold by her mother (Caterina Boratto) to entertainer Zampano (Anthony Quinn) for ten thousand lire, in Federico Fellini's La Strada, 1954.
Daughter Of Shanghai (1937) - Foreign Horde Floods U.S. Splashy aerial action to start, bracketed with blaring headlines as Feds in a bi-plane intercept John Patterson (as pilot Lang) and Anthony Quinn (age 22, as sidekick Morgan) smuggling Chinese persons into San Francisco, in the Paramount programmer and Anna May Wong vehicle, Daughter Of Shanghai, 1937.
Lawrence Of Arabia (1962) - Aqaba Peter O'Toole (title character) has intimated that he and colleagues (Omar Sharif, Anthony Quinn) were less-than sober for the glorious raid on Aqaba, Jordan, actually shot in Spain, in David Lean's Lawrence Of Arabia, 1962.
Across 110th Street (1972) - They Took Our Bank After a grisly shooting in the heist of tons of mob cash in Harlem, word reaches Anthony Franciosa as kingpin Nick D’Salvo, at a party shot in some upper-floor on Central Park South, taken aside by a senior boss (Frank Macetta) who, with nasty language, shares the news, in Across 110th Street, 1972.
Across 110th Street (1972) - I'm In Charge Here Joining NYPD captain Matelli (Anthony Quinn, who also produced), with loads of bad attitude and language, entering the crime scene where mafia guys, (crooked) cops and Harlem locals were all killed, and his first meeting with Yaphet Kotto as Lt. Pope, then their boss (Tim O’Connor) explaining the pecking order, in Across 110th Street, 1972.
Across 110th Street (1972) - You Must Be New Around Here In the aftermath of a big gang shooting, grizzled NYPD Capt. Matelli (Anthony Quinn, also the producer) works through a sea of witnesses called in by his less-senior supervisor Lt. Pope (Yaphet Kotto), who’s engaged with the informer Chink (Charles McGregor), in Across 110th Street, 1972.
Across 110th Street (1972) - Open, Theme Up the West Side Highway, through Central Park, turning north with a suitcase full of cash, an incoherent route via the Apollo Theater, winding up a block off St. Nicholas Ave., Bobby Womack’s landmark theme song establishes Harlem in the grim early 70’s, in Across 110th Street, 1972, starring (co-producer) Anthony Quinn and Yaphet Kotto.
Seven Cities Of Gold (1955) - The Glory Of Spain Interesting introduction of three principals (and two historical figures), Anthony Quinn as Spanish Captain Portola and Richard Egan his fictional lieutenant, in a reckless rush to Mexico City, causing an accident and meeting Father Junipero Serra (Michael Rennie), in 20th Century-Fox’s Seven Cities Of Gold, 1955.

Trailer

Requiem for a Heavyweight - (Original Trailer) Anthony Quinn is an aging boxer trying to escape a crooked manager (Jackie Gleason) in Rod Serling's drama Requiem For A Heavyweight (1962).
Happening, The - (Original Trailer) A kidnapped gangster (Anthony Quinn) joins forces with the hipsters who abducted him in The Happening (1967).
Guns of Navarone, The - (Original Trailer) A team of Allied saboteurs fight their way behind enemy lines to destroy The Guns of Navarone (1961) starring Gregory Peck and David Niven.
Guns for San Sebastian - (Original Trailer) A Mexican bandit (Anthony Quinn) masquerading as a priest gets roped into helping villagers defend against an Indian attack in Guns For San Sebastian (1968).
Against All Flags - (Original Trailer) A British officer (Errol Flynn) must face off against the pirates of Madagascar in Against All Flags (1952).
Bullets for O'Hara - (Original Trailer) A gangster's wife (Joan Perry) helps the FBI nail her husband (Anthony Quinn) in Bullets For O'Hara (1941).
Buccaneer, The (1958) - (Original Trailer) French pirate Jean Lafitte (Yul Brynner) tries to redeem his name helping the U.S. in the War of 1812 in Anthony Quinn's The Buccaneer (1958).
25th Hour, The - (Original Trailer) A Romanian peasant (Anthony Quinn) fights to get back to his family after he's imprisoned by the Nazis in The 25th Hour (1967).
Barabbas -- (Original Trailer) Anthony Quinn plays Barabbas (1962), the thief given freedom while Jesus was crucified.
Road To Singapore (1940) - (Original Trailer) Bob Hope, Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour star in Road To Singapore (1940), the first of their riotous "road" comedies.
Lion of the Desert - (Original Trailer) Omar Mukhtar (Anthony Quinn) is the Lion of the Desert (1981), preventing a takeover of Libya by Italian Fascist troops.
They Died With Their Boots On -- (Original Trailer) Errol Flynn stars in They Died With Their Boots On (1941), a romanticized biography of General George Armstrong Custer.

Promo

Family

Francesco Quinn
Father
Cameraman, propman. Died c. 1926 in a motor accident; fought in Pancho Villa's army.
Manuela Quinn
Mother
Half-Mexican, half-Native American.
Stella Quinn
Sister
Christopher Quinn
Son
Born c. 1938; accidently drowned in 1941 at age three in W C Fields' swimming pool; mother, Katherine DeMille.
Christina Quinn
Daughter
Born in 1941; mother, Katherine DeMille.
Catalina Quinn
Daughter
Born in 1942; mother, Katherine DeMille.
Duncan Quinn
Son
Born in 1945; mother Katherine DeMille; acted with father in "The Children of Sanchez" (1978).
Valentina Quinn
Daughter
Actor. Born in 1952; mother, Katherine DeMille.
Francesco Quinn
Son
Actor. Born c. 1963; mother Iolanda Addolori; estranged from father at time of his 1997 marriage to Kathy Benvin.
Daniele Antonio Quinn
Son
Actor, writer. Born c. 1964; mother, Iolanda Addolari; estranged from father at time of his 1997 marriage to Kathy Benvin; formerly married to actor Lauren Holly.
Lorenzo Quinn
Son
Actor, sculptor. Mother, Yolanda Addolori.
Alex Quinn
Son
Producer. Mother is German woman with whom Quinn was involved; woman is also mother of Sean Quinn.
Sean Quinn
Son
Mother is German woman with whom Quinn was involved; woman is also mother of Alex Quinn.
Antonia Quinn
Daughter
Born in July 1993; had child out of wedlock by his former secretary Kathy Benvin.
Ryan Nicholas Quinn
Son
Born on July 5, 1996 in Rhode Island; mother, Kathy Benvin.

Companions

Katherine DeMille
Wife
Actor. Cecil B DeMille's adopted daughter; married on October 2, 1937; divorced in 1965; died on April 27, 1995 at the age of 83; Quinn (by his own account) found out she was not a virgin on their wedding night (Cary Grant, reportedly, had deflowered her) and held it against her the rest of their marriage; the couple co-starred in "Black Gold" (1947), Quinn playing American Indian Charley Eagle.
Yolanda Quinn
Wife
Former costumer. Italian; married in January 1966; met when she worked as a wardrobe asistant on the film "Barabbas" (1961), starring Quinn; separated in February 1995; reached settlement in their divorce in August 1997.
Kathy Benvin
Wife
Secretary. Born c. 1962; mother of Antonia and Ryan Quinn; married on December 7, 1997 in Naples, Florida; resided with Quinn and their children in Bristol, Rhode Island.

Bibliography

"One Man Tango"
Anthony Quinn with Daniel Paisner, HarperCollins (1995)
"Original Sin"
Anthony Quinn, Little, Brown (1972)

Notes

In 1998, the Italo-American Club of Rhode Island named Quinn Man of the Year.

Quinn conceded to The Chicago Tribune (March 31, 1990) that he had received as much as $500,000 for an original piece of artwork but added modestly, "After shipping and paying off the auction house fees, I never made more than $175,000 from one piece."

He admitted to hundreds of affairs, including sessions with Carole Lombard, Maureen O'Hara, Rita Hayworth, Barbara Stanwyck, Ingrid Bergman and Bergman's daughter Pia Lindstrom.

"The press has never treated me with kid gloves. I've done some pretty good pictures, but they've never accepted me. I think it's being Latin-American. It's racism [toward] anybody that looks slightly foreign ...""I have been directed in 350 films. Of those, I have had 25 good directors, who knew what directing was: David Lean, [Federico] Fellini, George Cukor. Then I've been directed by half-ass directors who had an idea of a story they wanted to tell. 'This story has a great morality.' Then I was directed by 200 trafic cops. [In an officious voice] 'Turn left! Turn right! Cut! That's good, Tony!'"With all the bad ones, I had to overact, to prove I was there." --Anthony Quinn quoted in Daily News, July 11, 1995.

"My worst fault is that at the end of the day I find it extremely difficult--impossible, even--to turn off the character and let him rest until tomorrow. That's been my ... weight to carry as an actor. I'm that character until the film is finished. I can't be a Greek for just half a day. After 'La Strada' I went to Fellini and asked him, 'You do so damn many pictures, why don't you do another one with me.' And he looked at me and said, 'Because you will always be Zampano to me. If I think of you as another character, I get confused.' That's how I feel about myself when I am making a film." --Quinn to Buzzweekly, April 25-May 1, 1997.