Jack Priestley


Biography

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

Chances Are (1989)
2nd Unit Director (2nd Unit)

Cinematography (Feature Film)

The Hit Man (1991)
Director Of Photography
Rest in Peace, Mrs. Columbo (1990)
Director Of Photography
Agenda for Murder (1990)
Director Of Photography
Murder in Malibu (1990)
Director Of Photography
Uneasy Lies the Crown (1990)
Director Of Photography
Chances Are (1989)
Director Of Photography 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)
Back To The Future (Part 2) (1989)
Director Of Photography
Baby Boom (1987)
Director Of Photography
Dalton: Code of Vengeance (1986)
Director Of Photography
Lady Blue (1985)
Director Of Photography
Beat Street (1984)
Camera Operator
The Neighborhood (1982)
Director Of Photography
First Monday in October (1981)
Camera Operator
The First Deadly Sin (1980)
Director Of Photography
You Can't Go Home Again (1979)
Director Of Photography
Rockshow (1979)
Director Of Photography
Strike Force (1975)
Director Of Photography
The Silence (1975)
Director Of Photography
The Art of Crime (1975)
Director Of Photography
The Midnight Man (1974)
Director Of Photography
Cutter (1972)
Director Of Photography

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

Contract on Cherry Street (1977)
Photography

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Back To The Future (Part 2) (1989)
Dp/Cinematographer
Chances Are (1989)
Dp/Cinematographer

Cinematography (Special)

Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer: More Than Murder (1983)
Director Of Photography

Cinematography (TV Mini-Series)

Rage of Angels: The Story Continues (1986)
Director Of Photography
Seventh Avenue (1977)
Director Of Photography

Film Production - Main (TV Mini-Series)

Family Reunion (1981)
Photography

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Subject Was Roses, The (1968) - Open, Who Knows Where The Time Goes? Judy Collins’ vocal on Sandy Denny’s then-unreleased composition, first heard as the B-side of Collins’ hit 1968 recording of Joni Mitchell’s “Both Sides Now,” later recorded by Denny and Fairport Convention, nearly overshadows director Ulu Grosbard’s opening, with Patricia Neal, briefly Martin Sheen, and Jack Albertson, in his Academy Award-winning performance, from The Subject Was Roses. 1968.
Subject Was Roses, The (1968) - This Is Where I Came In Jack Albertson as Bronxite John was just trying on the uniform coat brought home by his still-snoozing son, just returned from WWII, when he notices his wife Nettie (Patricia Neal) coming back from morning shopping, character sketching in their first scene together, adapted by Frank Gilroy from his Pulitzer Prize-winning play, in The Subject Was Roses. 1968.
Subject Was Roses, The (1968) - Crazy About Waffles Dad (Jack Albertson) just departing the family Bronx apartment on business as his son (Martin Sheen as Timmy), the morning after his welcome-home from WWII party, converses with his mom (Patricia Neal as Nettie), raising her ire when he deploys one of the old man’s verbal devices, early in The Subject Was Roses. 1968, from the Frank D. Gilroy play.
First Deadly Sin, The (1980) - You Proposing To Me? First at the scene of a Manhattan murder he’s investigating then, as novelist Lawrence Sanders’ detective Edward Delaney, Frank Sinatra, in his last movie role, visits his wife (Faye Dunaway as Barbara), who is hospitalized throughout the picture with kidney troubles, in The First Deadly Sin, 1980.
First Deadly Sin, The (1980) - What Will They Think Of Next? With Anna Navarro, well-known TV actress and wife of the producer George Pappas, as jailed hooker Sunny, Frank Sinatra, in his last movie, as Lawrence Sanders’ New York detective Edward Delaney, asks what she knows about victim of a murder he’s hoping to resolve, just weeks before his retirement, in The First Deadly Sin, 1980.
First Deadly Sin, The (1980) - It Might Seem Unconventional Working with customer index cards obtained from a Manhattan sporting goods specialty store, after a murderer who owns an unusual ice-axe, cop Delaney (Frank Sinatra, in his last movie role) instructs volunteer helpers, Brenda Vaccaro as a victim’s widow, and Martin Gabel as an aging museum curator, in The First Deadly Sin, 1980.
First Deadly Sin, The (1980) - I Could Never Refuse A Pretty Face First scene for Frank Sinatra in his last movie, for sure shooting on West 81st St. in Manhattan, outside the Mt. Pleasant Baptist church, as Lawrence Sanders’ New York cop Edward Delaney, consulting with James Whitmore as the coroner, examining a victim, early in The First Deadly Sin, 1980.
Man Called Adam, A (1966) - I Want To Be Wanted Last bit of the artful credits then Sammy Davis Jr. in the title role, syncing neatly with Nat Adderly's recording, then singing the tune popularized by Brenda Lee, Kai Winding on trombone, before a clash with a customer, opening A Man Called Adam, 1966.
Man Called Adam, A (1966) - If You Had A Chick Or Something Troubled trumpeter Adam (Sammy Davis Jr.) at his New York pad after blowing off a Midwest gig, surprised to find Louis Armstrong and daughter Cicely Tyson waiting, forgetting he told pal Ossie Davis he could lend out the place, plus Lola Falana's first movie scene, early in A Man Called Adam, 1966.
Man Called Adam, A (1966) - All That Jazz Not the familiar tune from Chicago but an original by Benny Carter and Al Stillman, handily turned by Mel Torme at a Manhattan party, Frank Sinatra Jr. in the mix, Sammy Davis Jr. the title character and Louis Armstrong his musician-mentor friend, in A Man Called Adam, 1966.
Man Called Adam, A (1966) - I Know About Discrimination Finally a scene with Peter Lawford as agent "Manny," heretofore much discussed, probably as gritty a part as he ever played, Michael Lipton as junior partner Bobby and Sammy Davis Jr. in the title role as a hard-luck big-time jazz trumpeter, in A Man Called Adam, 1966.
Where's Poppa (1970) - Almost Doesn't Count Joining the opening and New York lawyer Gordon (George Segal), in his morning routine, then unlikely actions which we'll learn are actually an attempt to kill his mother (Ruth Gordon), early in director Carl Reiner's notoriously off-color Where's Poppa?, 1970.

Bibliography