Robert Pirosh


Screenwriter

About

Birth Place
Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Born
April 01, 1910

Biography

As he was born on April Fool's Day, it's fitting that screenwriter Robert Pirosh got his start scripting comedies. His career in Hollywood began in the 1930s, after he studied at the Sorbonne in Paris and the University of Berlin. He snagged a job as a junior writer at MGM, where he co-wrote with George Seaton. Together the two hashed out the story for 1935's lottery-centered comedy "The...

Biography

As he was born on April Fool's Day, it's fitting that screenwriter Robert Pirosh got his start scripting comedies. His career in Hollywood began in the 1930s, after he studied at the Sorbonne in Paris and the University of Berlin. He snagged a job as a junior writer at MGM, where he co-wrote with George Seaton. Together the two hashed out the story for 1935's lottery-centered comedy "The Winning Ticket," earning Pirosh his first film credit. Next they collaborated on a pair of iconic Marx Brothers comedies: the class-clashing musical comedy "A Night at the Opera" and the horserace-fueled romp "A Day at the Races." The two would go on to collaborate a handful of times over the coming years, but Pirosh came into his own in 1950, when he won an Oscar and a Golden Globe for penning the Battle of the Bulge drama "Battleground." Two years later, he earned Oscar attention again for his directorial debut, "Go For Broke!," a World War II drama that centered on a group of Japanese-American soldiers. Despite these filmic successes, Pirosh then moved into television, scripting episodes for numerous shows, including the long-running family drama "The Waltons," which was the last show he wrote for before retiring in 1981. Pirosh died on Christmas Day nearly 10 years later.

Life Events

Photo Collections

Battleground - Behind-the-Scenes Stills
Here are a number of photos taken behind-the-scenes during production of MGM's Battleground (1949), directed by William Wellman and starring Van Johnson, Ricardo Montalban, James Whitmore, George Murphy, and many others.

Videos

Movie Clip

Valley Of The Kings (1954) - Not That Kind Of Lady Opening scene in which MGM gets every penny of it's on-location at the pyramids payoff, aristocratic Ann (Eleanor Parker) introduces herself to rugged archaeologist Mark (Robert Taylor), who gets to slug a guy, in Valley Of The Kings, 1954.
Valley Of The Kings (1954) - In Tune With The Past Wardrobe for Eleanor Parker (as "Ann") almost as fancy as the locations, with husband Philip (Carlos Thompson) and explorer Mark (Robert Taylor), meeting a priest (Aldo Silvani), as she strives to complete her archaeologist father's mission, in MGM's Valley Of The Kings, 1954.
Day At The Races, A (1937) - I Proposed To Your Mother Horse doctor Hackenbush (Groucho Marx) enters as his rich patient Mrs. Upjohn (Margaret Dumont) is hoping to intervene on behalf of sanitarium owner Judy (Maureen O’Sullivan), who’s being railroaded by her business manager Whitmore (Leonard Ceeley), early in A Day At The Races, 1937.
Day At The Races, A (1937) - Make It Lilies For Me Desperate to prevent business manager Whitmore (Leonard Ceeley) from finding out he’s a veterinarian, newly-installed sanitarium boss Hackenbush (Groucho Marx) stages an elaborate phone call, in the MGM Marx Brothers comedy A Day At The Races, 1937.
I Married A Witch (1942) - You'll Be A Redhead! On the eve of his election as governor, candidate Wallace (Fredric March) is lured into a burning hotel by newly-embodied witch Jennifer (Veronica Lake), in I Married A Witch, 1942, directed by Renè Clair.
Day At The Races, A (1937) - I Told You To Throw That Race! Harpo Marx is introduced as mute jockey Stuffy, who recklessly wins a race he was supposed to throw, pursued by crooked banker Morgan (Douglas Dumbrille), aided by his horse owner pal (Allan Jones) and then race track hustler Tony (brother Chico), early in A Day At The Races, 1937.
Day At The Races, A (1937) - Either He's Dead, Or... For reasons not quite clear or relevant, sanitarium employee Tony (Chico Marx) has arranged for phony-doctor and new-boss Hackenbush (Groucho Marx) to examine his jockey buddy Stuffy (Harpo Marx), the first routine with all three together, in MGM’s A Day At The Races, 1937.
I Married A Witch (1942) - Fairer Than All Women Influence of producer Preston Sturges apparent, even on French director Rene Clair during his wartime Hollywood sojourn, opening scenes with protagonist Fredric March playing various of his ancestors, discussing witches, from I Married A Witch, 1942, co-starring Veronica Lake.
I Married A Witch (1942) - Love Grows Slowly Mischievous witch Jennifer (Veronica Lake) has wiled her way into sleeping over at the home of candidate Wallace (Fredric March), the night before his wedding, in I Married A Witch, 1942.
Up In Arms (1944) - This Brave Young Soldier Producer Samuel Goldwyn's opening for his first vehicle for newly-signed star Danny Kaye, which he begins as the hypochondriac elevator operator, haranguing doctors, patients and especially Higginbotham (Charles Arnt) in Up In Arms, 1944, with Dana Andrews, Dinah Shore and Constance Dowling.
Up In Arms (1944) - Theater Lobby Number His buddy Joe (Dana Andrews) and gals (Constance Dowling, Dinah Shore) are spectators for this fairly momentous scene, Danny Kaye's first song in his first feature film, known only as "Theater Lobby Number," by his wife Sylvia Fine, with Max Liebman, before anybody gets drafted, in Samuel Goldwyn's Up In Arms, 1944.
Up In Arms (1944) - Now I Know On leave from their base at a carnival, Danny (Kaye) has arranged for himself and Joe (Dana Andrews) to make a record, on which their nurse/officer dates Mary (Constance Dowling) and especially Virginia (Dinah Shore) excel, with a tune by Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler, in Samuel Goldwyn's Up In Arms, 1944.

Bibliography