Georges Perinal


Director Of Photography

About

Also Known As
George Perinal
Birth Place
Paris, FR
Died
April 23, 1965

Biography

Began his career as a projectionist in 1913 and went on to photograph some of the finest French films of the early 1930s, by directors including Jean Cocteau ("Blood of a Poet" 1930) and Rene Clair ("A nous la liberte" 1931, "Le million" 1932). Perinal began working with Alexander Korda in London in 1933 and applied his talents to a succession of fine English films, notably the Oscar-win...

Biography

Began his career as a projectionist in 1913 and went on to photograph some of the finest French films of the early 1930s, by directors including Jean Cocteau ("Blood of a Poet" 1930) and Rene Clair ("A nous la liberte" 1931, "Le million" 1932). Perinal began working with Alexander Korda in London in 1933 and applied his talents to a succession of fine English films, notably the Oscar-winning "The Thief of Bagdad" (1940). He worked in France and Hollywood in the late 1950s.

Filmography

 

Cinematography (Feature Film)

The Epic That Never Was (I, Claudius) (1965)
Director Of Photography ("I, Claudius")
Immoral Charge (1962)
Director of Photography
Once More, With Feeling! (1960)
Photography
The Day They Robbed the Bank of England (1960)
Director of Photography
Oscar Wilde (1960)
Director Of Photography
Lady Chatterley's Lover (1959)
Director Of Photography
Bonjour Tristesse (1958)
Photography
tom thumb (1958)
Director of Photography
Saint Joan (1957)
Photography
A King in New York (1957)
Director Of Photography
Satellite in the Sky (1956)
Director Of Photography
Three Cases of Murder (1955)
Photography
The Woman For Joe (1955)
Cinematographer
Babes in Bagdad (1952)
Director of Photography
I'll Never Forget You (1951)
Director of Photography
No Highway in the Sky (1951)
Director of Photography
The Mudlark (1950)
Director of Photography
My Daughter Joy (1950)
Cinematographer
The Forbidden Street (1949)
Director of Photography
The Fallen Idol (1948)
Director Of Photography
Vacation from Marriage (1945)
Photography
Suicide Squadron (1942)
Photography
The Thief of Bagdad (1940)
Photography
The Four Feathers (1939)
Photography
The Challenge (1939)
Photography
Prison Without Bars (1939)
Chief Camera
The Drum (1938)
Photography
Murder on Diamond Row (1937)
Photography
Dark Journey (1937)
Photography
Under the Red Robe (1937)
Photography
The Girl from Maxim's (1936)
Photography
Things to Come (1936)
Photography
Rembrandt (1936)
Photography
Escape Me Never (1935)
Camera
Sanders of the River (1935)
Photography
The Private Life of Henry VIII (1934)
Photography
The Private Life of Don Juan (1934)
Photography
July 14th (1933)
Director Of Photography
The Blood of a Poet (1932)
Director Of Photography
David Golder (1930)
Cinematographer

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

That Dangerous Age (1949)
Photography
À nous la liberté (1931)
Photography
Le Million (1931)
Photography
Under the Roofs of Paris (1930)
Photography

Life Events

1923

First short film photographed, "Chartres"

1930

First effort as director of photography for Rene Clair, "Sous les toits de Paris/Under the Roofs of Paris"

1933

Left France for England as cinematographer Alexander Korda's "The Private Life of Henry VIII"

1960

Last film assignment as cinematographer, "The Day They Robbed The Bank of England"

Videos

Movie Clip

Things to Come (1936) - Stand to Arms The citizens of "Everytown" are both warned and reassured as they prepare for attack, while Cabal (Raymond Massey) and wife (Sophie Stewart) muse about their future in H.G. Wells Things to Come, 1936.
Things to Come (1936) - Opening, 1940, War The ominous credit and opening sequence from Things to Come, 1936, from H.G. Wells' screenplay and novel, produced by Alexander Korda and directed by famed production designer William Cameron Menzies.
Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp, The (1943) - Whatever You Shoot Young Clive Wynne-Candy (Roger Livesey) returned from the Boer War, welcomed by Aunt Margaret (Muriel Aked, with servant Phyllis Morris) with a suggestion he follows, time flying, trick photography, from Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp, 1943.
Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp, The (1943) - You Are Livingstone, I Presume? Candy (Roger Livesey) meets Edith (Deborah Kerr) in Berlin, just about perfectly cast in her first appearance in her earliest (of three) characters in Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, 1943.
Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, The (1943) - Opening, Total War, Isn't It? A variation on the usual "Archers" open (with no arrow!), then a clever embroidery theme for the credits, then the roaring military-musical motorcycling sequence, opening Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's celebrated The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp, 1943.
Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp, The (1943) - Fighting Positions Candy (Roger Livesey) is obliged to duel a German officer (Anton Walbrook) drawn by lot, advised by Colonel Borg (Theodor Zichy), memorably staged by director Michael Powell, in the Boer War segment of The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp, 1943.
Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp, The (1943) - Forty Years Ago Part of the opening narrative device, home guard squad led by "Spud" Wilson (James McKechnie) arresting the elder General Wynne-Candy (Roger Livesey) at a Turkish bath, from Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp, 1943.
Four Feathers, The (1939) - Plenty For Other Men The four young officers introduced as adults, Ralph Richardson as Captain John, John Clements, Jack Allen and Donald Gray as lieutenants Harry, Willoughby and Peter, tension as their mission to Egypt is revealed, in Zoltan Korda's version of the A.E.W. Mason novel, The Four Feathers, 1939.
Four Feathers, The (1939) - If We Were Free London, 1895, Harry (John Clements) discovers his miscalculation, wife Ethne (June Duprez) not welcoming his resignation from the army, her father (C. Aubrey Smith) just returned from seeing off his comrades, who have sent a message, a pivotal moment in Zoltan Korda's The Four Feathers, 1939.
Four Feathers, The (1939) - Captain Durrance British Captain Durrance (Ralph Richardson) on patrol in the Sudan, locates the enemy but fails to make it back to warn his colleagues, director Zoltan Korda shooting in Technicolor on the genuine location, in The Four Feathers, 1939.
Thief Of Bagdad, The (1940) - This Is No Dog Plenty of spectacle in the opening scene, introducing the evil magician Jaffar (Conrad Veidt) arriving in Basra, and the not-much-explained "Blind Man" (John Justin), in Alexander Korda's The Thief Of Bagdad, 1940.
Thief Of Bagdad, The (1940) - Free, Free, After Two Thousand Years Abu (Sabu), shipwrecked by his evil magician enemy, discovers a bottle, the not overly bright Djinn (Rex Ingram) inside, one of the more famous effects from producer Alexander Korda's The Thief Of Bagdad, 1940.

Trailer

Bibliography