Arthur J. Ornitz


Director Of Photography

About

Also Known As
Arthur Ornitz
Died
July 10, 1985
Cause of Death
Cancer

Biography

Has worked with independent filmmakers such as Shirley Clarke ("The Connection" 1961) and Russ Meyer ("Sweet Suzy/Blacksnake" 1973) and is best known for his many captivating images of New York City, in both black-and-white ("A Thousand Clowns" 1965) and color ("Serpico" 1973)....

Biography

Has worked with independent filmmakers such as Shirley Clarke ("The Connection" 1961) and Russ Meyer ("Sweet Suzy/Blacksnake" 1973) and is best known for his many captivating images of New York City, in both black-and-white ("A Thousand Clowns" 1965) and color ("Serpico" 1973).

Filmography

 

Cinematography (Feature Film)

Heart of the Garden (1985)
Director Of Photography
First Affair (1983)
Director Of Photography
Jacobo Timerman: Prisoner Without a Name, Cell Without a Number (1983)
Director Of Photography
Hanky-Panky (1982)
Director Of Photography
The Royal Romance of Charles and Diana (1982)
Director Of Photography
The Chosen (1981)
Director Of Photography
Tattoo (1981)
Director Of Photography
Playing for Time (1980)
Director Of Photography
Hardhat and Legs (1980)
Director Of Photography
Mayflower: The Pilgrim's Adventure (1979)
Director Of Photography
An Unmarried Woman (1978)
Director Of Photography
Oliver's Story (1978)
Director Of Photography
The Wilma Rudolph Story (1977)
Director Of Photography
The Quinns (1977)
Director Of Photography
Thieves (1977)
Director Of Photography
Next Stop, Greenwich Village (1976)
Director Of Photography
E'Lollipop (1975)
Director Of Photography
Law and Disorder (1974)
Director Of Photography
Death Wish (1974)
Director Of Photography
Serpico (1974)
Director Of Photography
Honor Thy Father (1973)
Director Of Photography
Badge 373 (1973)
Cinematographer
Sweet Suzy (1973)
Director Of Photography
The Possession of Joel Delaney (1972)
Director of Photography
The Anderson Tapes (1971)
Director of Photography
Minnie and Moskowitz (1971)
Director of Photography
Soldier Blue (1970)
Director Photographer (see note)
House of Dark Shadows (1970)
Director of Photography
The Boys in the Band (1970)
Director of Photography
Me, Natalie (1969)
Director of Photography
Change of Mind (1969)
Director of Photography
Charly (1968)
Director of Photography
A Midsummer Night's Dream (1967)
Director of Photography
The Tiger Makes Out (1967)
Director of Photography
A Thousand Clowns (1965)
Director of Photography
The World of Henry Orient (1964)
Director of Photography
Act One (1963)
Director of Photography
Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962)
Director of Photography
The Connection (1962)
Director of Photography
Jacktown (1962)
Director of Photography
The Young Doctors (1961)
Cinematographer
Teenage Millionaire (1961)
Song sequence Director of Photographer
The Pusher (1960)
Director of Photography
The Goddess (1958)
Director of Photography

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Playing for Time (1980)
Dp/Cinematographer
Death Wish (1974)
Dp/Cinematographer

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

House Of Dark Shadows (1970) - Thank You, Daphne After an eventful credit sequence, Daphne (Lisa Richards), secretary to Elizabeth (Joan Bennett), leaves "Collinwood" on foot, is attacked, then rescued by Jeff (Roger Davis), in House Of Dark Shadows, 1970.
House Of Dark Shadows (1970) - A Cousin From England Subjective camera introducing presumably benign Barnabas (Jonathan Frid), who meets Collins cousins (Joan Bennett, Louis Edmonds, Nancy Barrett) and doctor friends (Thayer David, Grayson Hall), early in House Of Dark Shadows, 1970, the first of two features based on the ABC daytime soap opera.
House Of Dark Shadows (1970) - What He Thought Would Be Eternity Ancient vampire Barnabas (Jonathan Frid) explaining affairs to reluctant aide Willie (John Karlen), interrupted by jealous new vampire Carolyn (Nancy Barrett), dying for the first time, in House Of Dark Shadows, 1970.
Act One (1963) - My Indigent Friends George Hamilton as future playwright Moss Hart meets his New York buddies, George Segal, David Doyle, Bert Convy as actor Archie Leach (who will become Cary Grant) and Jonathan Lippe (later Goldsmith, the “Most Interesting Man In The World,” from the beer commercials) as Teddy, in the bio-pic Act One, 1963.
Act One (1963) - Indications Of Further Nervousness Writer, producer and director Dore Schary enjoying an extended piece of context-setting via radio news, introducing George Hamilton as his central character, will-be playwright Moss Hart, in the 1963 bio-pic based on Hart’s memoir, Act One.
Act One (1963) - Satire Is A Disciplined Form Made to wait for days, to see Broadway producer Warren Stone (Eli Wallach), who has agreed to read his comedy, Moss Hart (George Hamilton) finally gets in, and gets more than he wants, in 1929 New York, in Dore Schary’s film from Hart’s memoir, Act One, 1963.
Connection, The (1962) - Who Killed Cock Robin? First of many performances which alone justify making the film, pianist Freddie Redd’s composition, with alto sax hero Jackie McLean, Mike Mattos and Larry Ritchie, bass and drums, William Redfield the filmmaker, Shirley Clarke actually directing, from Jack Gelber’s play and screenplay, in The Connection 1962.
World Of Henry Orient, The (1964) - Beautiful White Nurses Director George Roy Hill's idyllic Central Park in which Marian (Merrie Spaeth) awaits Valerie (Tippy Boyd) who together have their first encounter with the title character (Peter Sellers) and girlfriend Stella (Paula Prentiss), in The World Of Henry Orient, 1964.
World Of Henry Orient, The (1964) - Dress Like A Chinaman Conniving society mom Isabel (Angela Lansbury) calls first her paramour Joe (Peter Duchin) then befuddled and egotistical pianist Orient (Peter Sellers) when her daughter has flown the coop, in The World Of Henry Orient, 1964.
World Of Henry Orient, The (1964) - If This Is Music Inside Carnegie Hall for director George Roy Hill's send up of Avant-garde orchestral music, Peter Sellers the title character in concert, Phyllis Thaxter, Bibi Osterwald and teens Merrie Spaeth and Tippy Walker in his audience, in The World Of Henry Orient, 1964.
Connection, The (1962) - I Don't Feel Like Getting Busted It’s now clear that Leach (Warren Finnerty) and his fellow heroin-addict guests are being directed by a barely-seen documentarian, musicians Mike Mattos, Freddie Redd, Jackie McLean and Larry Ritchie as themselves, Jerome Raphel as Sully, Garry Goodrow as Ernie, in Shirley Clarke’s The Connection, 1962.
Connection, The (1962) - In A Drug Addict's Apartment Challenging from the start, Shirley Clarke directs from Jack Gelber’s experimental play and screenplay, Roscoe Lee Browne the voice of cameraman character, Burden, the opening address to camera by Leach (Warren Finnerty) the de facto host of the junkies waiting to score, in The Connection, 1962.

Trailer

Bibliography