Senta Berger


Actor

About

Birth Place
Austria
Born
May 13, 1941

Biography

Senta Berger is a sensual on-screen performer with a behind the scenes entrepreneurial streak. Served well by the acting and ballet lessons she took as child, she debuted in the West German movie market and, in the 1950s and early '60s, found quick success as the co-star of several acrobatic musicals and comedies. Naturally, Hollywood came calling, and she soon found herself dividing her...

Biography

Senta Berger is a sensual on-screen performer with a behind the scenes entrepreneurial streak. Served well by the acting and ballet lessons she took as child, she debuted in the West German movie market and, in the 1950s and early '60s, found quick success as the co-star of several acrobatic musicals and comedies. Naturally, Hollywood came calling, and she soon found herself dividing her time between an established career in Germany and a burgeoning presence in America, where she starred in films such as the lively wartime western "Major Dundee" and the Kirk Douglas army epic "Cast a Giant Shadow." In the process, she met, married, and formed a production company with German director Michael Verhoeven, kicking off a long-running partnership that's seen her take on various roles both in front of and behind the camera. While films such as the bawdy caveman comedy "When Woman Had Tails" garnered her fame in Italy and France, solidifying her status as a full-blown international sex symbol, her primary role in Germany eventually shifted to that of a serious-minded producer. In addition to overseeing projects such as the challenging and darkly comic "The Nasty Girl" (1990), she took time to briefly pursue a singing career. In the '00s, she reemerged as the gracefully aged star of such late-life romances as "Einmal so wie ich will," in which she plays an unhappily married woman who finds new love while on vacation.

Life Events

1957

First feature film as actress

Photo Collections

Cast a Giant Shadow - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for Cast a Giant Shadow (1966), featuring an all-star cast. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.

Videos

Movie Clip

Major Dundee (1965) -- (Movie Clip) The Major Ain't No Lawyer Now in Mexico, chasing the Apache and short on supplies, Charlton Heston (title character) with Graham (Jim Hutton) on artillery and scout Sam (James Coburn), enters a village loosely occupied by French imperial troops, where Senta Berger (as Teresa) makes her first appearance, and Tyreen (Richard Harris), head of the consrcripted Confederate troops, takes a different approach, in Sam Peckinpah’s Major Dundee, 1965.
Ambushers, The (1967) -- (Movie Clip) I've Got Relatives There Now in Acapulco, Dean Martin as photographer-playboy secret agent Matt Helm with Janice Rule as Sheila, the rescued formerly brainwashed astronaut helping him find her abductors, posing as newlyweds, observing the chopper arrival of villain Albert Salmi, when Francesca (Senta Berger) introduces herself, in the 3rd Helm feature, The Ambushers, 1967.
Ambushers, The (1967) -- (Movie Clip) I Go Pretty Fast Little besides clever skimpy outfits for the first scene with Dean Martin in the lead role in the third film in the Matt Helm spy-spoof series, first with Linda Foster, then Janice Rule whom we saw captured and maybe-brainwashed in the opening, in The Ambushers 1967, also starring Senta Berger.
Our Man In Marrakesh (1966) -- (Movie Clip) I Have No Luggage! Arrived at the hotel, observed by spooky Klaus Kinski, Tony Randall, who may really be a tourist, and Senta Berger, whom we suspect is an agent, soon finding the guy murdered in the opening, in the spy comedy Our Man In Marrakesh a.k.a. Bang! Bang! You're Dead
Our Man In Marrakesh (1966) -- (Movie Clip) Open, Airport Klaus Kinski the nameless villain dominates this opening in Casablanca, then arrivals (Helen Sanguineti, Wilfrid Hyde-White and stars Tony Randall and Senta Berger) boarding the bus, opening the spy-spoof Our Man In Marrakesh, a.k.a. Bang! Bang! You're Dead 1966.

Bibliography