Lynda Obst


Producer

About

Also Known As
Lynda Rosen, Lynda Rosen Obst
Birth Place
New York City, New York, USA
Born
April 14, 1950

Biography

A former editor of THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE, Obst moved into film production in 1979, first with the Casablanca/Polygram company, where she was involved in the development of "Flashdance" (1983). After a three-year stint at The David Geffen Company, Obst teamed with producer Debra Hill to form Hill/Obst Productions, which was responsible for "Adventures in Babysitting" (1987), "Heartb...

Family & Companions

David Obst
Husband
Executive. Divorced.

Bibliography

"Hello, He Lied -- and Other Truths About Hollywood"
Lynda Obst, Little, Brown (1996)
"Dirty Dreams"
Lynda Obst and Carol Wolper

Biography

A former editor of THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE, Obst moved into film production in 1979, first with the Casablanca/Polygram company, where she was involved in the development of "Flashdance" (1983). After a three-year stint at The David Geffen Company, Obst teamed with producer Debra Hill to form Hill/Obst Productions, which was responsible for "Adventures in Babysitting" (1987), "Heartbreak Hotel" (1988) and "The Fisher King" (1991). In 1988, Obst went solo, establishing Lynda Obst Productions through which she produced Nora Ephron's directorial debut, "This Is My Life" (1992) and Ephron's box-office success "Sleepless in Seattle" (1994). She renewed her deal to produce for Fox 2000 Pictures in 1996. Obst also co-authored (with Carol Wolper) the Hollywood novel "Dirty Dreams" and has written numerous satirical essays for magazines including AMERICAN FILM and HARPER'S. In 1996, she published a memoir of sorts, "Hello, He Lied--and Other Truths About Hollywood."

Life Events

1979

Joined Casablanca/Polygram as vice president of creative affairs

1982

Moved to The David Geffen Company

1985

Formed independent production company Hill/Obst Productions with producer Debra Hill

1988

Struck own producing deal with Columbia Pictures and established Lynda Obst Productions in November

1991

Co-authored the novel "Dirty Dreams" with Carol Wolper

1993

Produced the hit romantic comedy "Sleepless in Seattle"

1993

Signed long-term agreement with Fox

1996

Served as producer on the romantic comedy "One Fine Day"

1996

Renewed agreement with Fox

1999

Produced the NBC miniseries "The 60's"

1999

Signed three-year production deal with Paramount Pictures

Videos

Movie Clip

Sleepless In Seattle (1993) - Not Even When I Was Young Leaving her parents’ Christmas dinner in (Annapolis) Maryland, having just announced their engagement, Walter (Bill Pullman) and Annie (Meg Ryan) head back to Washington D.C. in separate cars, and she hears Jonah (Ross Malinger) call the radio show (Caroline Aaron the host) on behalf of his widowed dad (Tom Hanks), early in Sleepless In Seattle, 1993.
Sleepless In Seattle (1993) - A Million Tiny Little Things Christmas Eve after dark, hesitant bride-to-be Annie (Meg Ryan) stops by a Baltimore diner where the staff (Linda Walem, LaTanya Richardson) are listening to the same radio show she heard in the car, Caroline Aaron the host, Tom Hanks the reluctant widowed dad Sam, in Sleepless In Seattle, 1993.
Sleepless In Seattle (1993) - Men Never Get This Movie! Writer-director Nora Ephron, Meg Ryan as Annie (engaged to “Walter”) and Rosie O’Donnell as pal Becky dig into director Leo McCarey’s An Affair To Remember, 1957, with Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr, while Meg considers a letter to the widowed father (Tom Hanks) she heard on the radio, in Sleepless In Seattle, 1993.
Sleepless In Seattle (1993) - All I Could Say Was Hello (Significant SPOILER!) Meg Ryan as (otherwise) engaged Annie is benevolently stalking Tom Hanks, as single-dad Sam, (with Ross Malinger as his son and Rita Wilson, Tom’s real-life wife, as his sister, though Meg assumes she’s a girlfriend), then explaining to Becky (Rosie O’Donnell) back in Baltimore, leading to a second reference to Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr, in An Affair To Remember, 1957, in Sleepless In Seattle, 1993.
Fisher King, The (1991) - Thank God I'm Me The opening from director Terry Gilliam and from Richard LaGravanese’s original screenplay, Jeff Bridges as New York shock-jock Jack Lucas, his caller Edwin (Christian Clemenson) providing a critical plot point, in The Fisher King, 1991, with Robin Williams and Mercedes Ruehl.
Fisher King, The (1991) - Forgive Me! Egotistical New York radio shock jock Jack (Jeff Bridges) in his apartment preparing for his TV sitcom audition when he learns, from a TV reporter (Frazer Smith) that his caller “Edwin,” whom he’s encouraged to hate “yuppies,” has become a mass murderer, in Terry Gilliam’s The Fisher King, 1991.
Fisher King, The (1991) - I Do Believe In Fairies Depressed former radio shock jock Jack (Jeff Bridges), thinking about throwing himself from the Manhattan Bridge, is attacked by thugs (Jayce Bartok, Dan Futterman), then rescued by profane Parry (Robin Williams, his first scene) and his homeless band, in Terry Gilliam’s The Fisher King, 1991.
Fisher King, The (1991) - Jesus' Juice Glass A feature scene for Mercedes Ruehl in her Academy Award-nominated role, as Anne, employer and girlfriend of former radio star Jack (Jeff Bridges), who’s wondering about the Holy Grail after meeting a visionary vagrant (Robin Williams, not seen), in Terry Gilliam’s The Fisher King, 1991.
Fisher King, The (1991) - She Loves Dumplings Ex-radio shock jock Jack (Jeff Bridges), having learned that his rants led to the murder of the wife of homeless Parry (Robin Williams), finds him around Park Ave. and East 24th in Manhattan, where he turns out to be observing Lydia (Amanda Plummer), in Terry Gilliam’s The Fisher King, 1991.

Trailer

Family

Oliver Obst
Son
Born in 1978.

Companions

David Obst
Husband
Executive. Divorced.

Bibliography

"Hello, He Lied -- and Other Truths About Hollywood"
Lynda Obst, Little, Brown (1996)
"Dirty Dreams"
Lynda Obst and Carol Wolper