Leslie Nielsen


Actor
Leslie Nielsen

About

Birth Place
Regina, Saskatchewan, CA
Born
February 11, 1926
Died
November 28, 2010
Cause of Death
Complications From Pneumonia

Biography

Leslie Nielsen disproved the adage that American lives have no second acts. After decades as a leading man in genre motion pictures like "Forbidden Planet" (1956) and "The Plainsman" (1966), Nielsen inserted his serious, authoritative persona into the parody-based comedies of the Zucker brothers and enjoyed a highly successful second career arc in films like "Airplane" (1980) and especia...

Photos & Videos

The Sheepman - Publicity Stills
Forbidden Planet - Lobby Card Set
Forbidden Planet Novelization

Family & Companions

Monica Bayar
Wife
Married in 1950; divorced in 1955.
Sandy Ullman
Wife
Married in 1958; divorced; mother of Nielsen's daughters.
Brooks Nielsen
Wife
Married in 1981; divorced in 1983.
Barbaree Earl
Companion
Together since c. 1983.

Bibliography

"Bad Golf My Way"
Leslie Nielsen and Henry Beard, Doubleday (1996)
"The Naked Truth"
Leslie Nielsen and David Fisher, Pocket Books (1993)

Notes

His official Web site is at http://www.amiamsterdam.on.ca/ln/.

"When I was twenty I was scared I'd be perceived as a country bumpkin . . . I found it necessary to cultivate a worldliness I really didn't possess, to protect myself against all my insecurities. People believed my act, and soon I was known as a serious actor who played serious roles . . . I spent the first four years waiting for the acting police to knock on my door, tell me I have no talent and send me back to Canada . . . I don't think I'm getting funnier, I'm getting freer. The more confident you become, the freer you are to become who you really are." --Leslie Nielsen quoted in Parade Magazine, November 20, 1994.

Biography

Leslie Nielsen disproved the adage that American lives have no second acts. After decades as a leading man in genre motion pictures like "Forbidden Planet" (1956) and "The Plainsman" (1966), Nielsen inserted his serious, authoritative persona into the parody-based comedies of the Zucker brothers and enjoyed a highly successful second career arc in films like "Airplane" (1980) and especially the "Naked Gun" series (1988, 1991, 1994), as well as "Scary Movie 3" (2003) and "Scary Movie 4" (2006). The key to the silver-haired leading man's timeless success was his deadpan delivery and seeming obliviousness to situations rife with sight gags and slapstick comedy. There was simply no one like him and people of all ages responded for over two decades to his brilliantly empty-headed persona.

The son of a Royal Canadian Mountie, Nielsen was born on Feb. 11, 1926, in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. He spent his early years living in a remote post near the Arctic Circle where his father was stationed, but returned to civilization to enjoy his teen years at Victoria High School in Edmonton, Alberta. After high school, he did a year of service with the Royal Canadian Air Force and moved to Calgary, where he landed a job as a disc jockey and radio announcer. He fell in love with performing and sought his first professional training at the Lorne Greene Academy of Radio Arts in Toronto, a school founded by the future "Bonanza" (NBC, 1959-1973) star who was then a well-known radio news broadcaster in Canada. In the late 1940s, Nielsen was accepted into the prestigious Neighborhood Playhouse School in New York City, where he studied under Sanford Meisner and began appearing in regional theater.

Tall and broad with a booming baritone and bright blue eyes, Nielsen had it easy breaking into television, though he would later admit that he had been so self-conscious of his humble background that he had fabricated a serious persona he assumed a professional actor ought to have. In any event, that persona proved to be a steady meal ticket and Nielsen landed dozens of roles on the live television dramas of the day like "Studio One" (CBS, 1948-1958), "Playhouse 90" (CBS, 1956-1961) and "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (NBC, 1955-1964). In 1954, he moved to Hollywood and signed a deal with Paramount Pictures, enjoying his first brush with fame by playing the lead spaceship commander in the sci-fi classic "Forbidden Planet" (1956). He essayed the occasional romantic lead in "The Opposite Sex" (1956) and the first of the Debbie Reynolds series "Tammy and the Bachelor" (1957), but generally stuck to manly, military roles and gun-slinging cowboys in "The Sheepman" (1958) , "The Plainsman" (1966) and "Beau Geste" (1966).

On the small screen, Nielsen had a recurring role on "The Virginian" (NBC, 1962-1971) before he was cast in a starring role as a deputy chief of police on the urban police drama "The Bold Ones: The Protectors" (NBC, 1969-1970). Following the show's untimely demise, he was cast in the pilot of "Hawaii Five-O," but when the show was picked up, he failed to make the cut. Nielsen also appeared in the TV film "The Aquarians" (NBC, 1970) before joining the era's disaster film trend with a role in "The Poseidon Adventure" (1972). He played a cop in the TV film "Brink's: The Great Robbery" (CBS, 1976), a military agent on the run from involuntary chemical experimentation in the big screen thriller "Project Kill" (1976), and remained generally prolific with guest spots on shows like "M*A*S*H" (CBS, 1972-1983) and "The Streets of San Francisco" (ABC, 1972-77).

In 1980, writer-director Jerry Zucker's vision of taking actors known for their unshakable seriousness and surrounding them with ludicrous sight gags meant a career turning point for the 54-year-old Nielsen. He was cast alongside fellow stoics Robert Stack, Peter Graves, and Lloyd Bridges in the uproarious Zucker- Abrahams comedy "Airplane!" (1980) which parodied disaster films and also included heavy doses of pop culture send-ups. As a doctor aboard a doomed commercial flight overcome by food poisoning, Nielsen gave a flawlessly deadpan delivery of quotable dialogue that spoofed his stolid screen persona and proved his impeccable comic timing. In fact, the actor delivered one of the most famous lines in comedy history when, after he asks a passenger if he can fly the plane and the man replies, "Surely you can't be serious," Nielsen responds: "I am serious, and don't call me Shirley." The film was a box office hit as well as critical success, earning a Golden Globe nomination and a place in history as the American Film Institute's 10th "Funniest American Movie of All Time." But despite the unveiling of his previously unseen talent, he was not yet considered a comedic actor, so resumed his career with a pair of horror films, including "Prom Night" (1980) and "Creepshow" (1982).

The Zucker-Abrahams team came to Nielsen again in 1982 with a script for a half-hour comedy spoof of the popular Quinn-Martin-style police dramas of the 1960s and 1970s. Nielsen was cast as bumbling detective Frank Drebin of "Police Squad" (ABC, 1982) and earned an Emmy Award for his brilliant contributions to the detail-packed, ceaselessly funny show which was inexplicably canceled after only six episodes. Revered for his second great performance, Nielsen countered suggestions that he was being cast against type with the suggestion that during the first 30 years of his career was when he had actually been cast against type; that he was actually a closet comedian. Despite his public proclamations, for the next six years he was still only tapped for more action drama roles and TV films until the Zucker-Abrahams folks came calling again in 1988 with a feature adaptation of the "Police Squad" premise. For "The Naked Gun - From the Files of Police Squad!" (1988), Nielsen reprised his role of Frank Drebin and a comedy film franchise was born. This time Nielsen had a full 90 minutes of screen time immersed in pratfalls and bad puns - to say nothing of hilariously bad driving - and the result was wildly successful hit with both critics and audiences.

With his latest hit, Nielsen was transformed into the go-to-guy for parodies. He was tapped by filmmaker Bob Logan to star in an "Exorcist" (1973) spoof "Repossessed" (1990), but Nielsen's attachment alone was not enough to make the weak send-up a success. But the next year, the dream team delivered another hit with "The Naked Gun 2-1/2: The Smell of Fear" (1991), which found Lieutenant Drebin attempting to head off a Washington energy lobby conspiracy. Nielsen had a guest appearance on the series finale of "Golden Girls" the following year, as the man who wins Dorothy (Bea Arthur's) heart, and followed it up with the lackluster kiddie offering "Surf Ninjas" (1993). Nielsen released a mock autobiography which claimed, among other things, several Oscars and an affair with Elizabeth Taylor. Further banking on his reputation, he made several mock golf instructional videos including "Bad Golf Made Easier" (1993) and "Bad Golf My Way" (1994). That year he also starred in the capper "Naked Gun 33-1/3: The Final Insult" (1994) however, David Zucker had vacated the director's chair and the series had run its course - both creatively and due to the pall cast by the notorious double murder trial of the film's co-star, O J Simpson.

Beginning in 1994, Nielsen returned to his Canadian roots with an entertaining recurring role as Canadian Mountie Sgt. Buck Frobisher on the cult TV favorite "Due South" (CTV, 1994-99). He took another stab at children's comedy with a starring role in "Rent-a-Kid" (1995) and went on to appear in Mel Brooks' "Dracula: Dead and Loving It" (1995). The vampire send-up was a flop so he took spoofing into his own hands as the executive producer of "Spy Hard" (1996), which paled in comparison to his Zucker-Abrahams collaborations but, nonetheless, did moderately well at the box office. Nielsen's hapless klutz might have been an inspired choice to play the live action adaptation of animated oldster "Mr. Magoo" (1997), but that kids' film and his follow-up action film parody "Wrongfully Accused" (1998) both fizzled. Adopting another bumbling detective persona, Nielsen starred in "2001: A Space Travesty" (2000), an obvious reference to the Kubrick classic but whereas Kubrick's was considered one of film history's best, this was among the worst.

The silver-haired star was back at the top of his game when David Zucker tapped him to appear as the paranoid (and at one point, almost entirely naked) President of the United States in the amusing horror spoof sequel "Scary Movie 3" (2003). Nielsen revived his doofus President Allen for the even more popular "Scary Movie 4" (2006) - the inevitable sequel - in which everything under the sun was given the David Zucker treatment. Nielsen made a rare appearance in the well-received dramatic indie "The Music Within" (2007), though only a few festival audiences were able to appreciate this very different performance. That same year, he lent a comedic edge to the Discovery Channel medical documentary series "Doctor*ology" (Discovery, 2007). Nielsen was back to his old tricks in 2008's moderate parody hit "Super Hero Movie," which was produced by Zucker and written and directed by "Scary Movie 3" and "4"'s Craig Mazin. Sadly, the beloved actor passed away on Nov. 28, 2010 from complications from pneumonia. He was 84 years old.

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

Stan Helsing (2009)
Spanish Movie (2009)
An American Carol (2008)
Superhero Movie (2008)
Slap Shot 3: The Junior League (2008)
Music Within (2007)
Christmas in Wonderland (2007)
Scary Movie 4 (2006)
Scary Movie 3 (2003)
2001: A Space Travesty (2002)
Men With Brooms (2002)
Gordon Cutter
Kevin of the North (2001)
Camouflage (2000)
Santa Who? (2000)
Harvey (1999)
Safety Patrol (1998)
Wrongfully Accused (1998)
Mr. Magoo (1997)
Family Plan (1997)
Spy Hard (1996)
Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1995)
Rent-a-Kid (1995)
Naked Gun 33 1/3: The Final Insult (1994)
Surf Ninjas (1993)
Digger (1992)
Arthur
Chance of a Lifetime (1991)
All I Want for Christmas (1991)
The Naked Gun 2 1/2: The Smell of Fear (1991)
Repossessed (1990)
Father Mayii
Dangerous Curves (1988)
The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad! (1988)
Nightstick (1987)
Thad Evans
Home Is Where the Hart Is (1987)
Sheriff Nashville Schwartz
Fatal Confession: A Father Dowling Mystery (1987)
Nuts (1987)
The Canadian Conspiracy (1986)
The Patriot (1986)
Admiral Frazer
Soul Man (1986)
Reckless Disregard (1985)
Bob Franklin
Blade in Hong Kong (1985)
Harry Ingersol
The Bradbury Trilogy (1985)
Fantocinni ("Marionettes Inc")
The Homefront (1984)
Narration
The Night the Bridge Fell Down (1983)
Cave-In! (1983)
Joe Johnson
Wrong Is Right (1982)
Creepshow (1982)
The Creature Wasn't Nice (1981)
Jameson
Prom Night (1980)
Mr Hammond
Airplane! (1980)
Ohms (1980)
Institute for Revenge (1979)
Counselor Barnes
City on Fire (1979)
The Amsterdam Kill (1978)
Riley Knight
Little Mo (1978)
Viva Knievel! (1977)
Sixth and Main (1977)
John Doe
Grand Jury (1976)
Project: Kill (1976)
Brink's: The Great Robbery (1976)
Day Of The Animals (1976)
Mr Paul Jenson
Can Ellen Be Saved? (1974)
Arnold Lindsey
Snatched (1973)
Bill Sutter
...And Millions Will Die! (1973)
The Letters (1973)
The Poseidon Adventure (1972)
The Captain [Harrison]
The Resurrection of Zachary Wheeler (1971)
Harry Walsh
The Return Of Charlie Chan (1971)
Alexander Hadrachi
They Call It Murder (1971)
Change of Mind (1969)
Sheriff Webb
How To Commit Marriage (1969)
Phil Fletcher
Dayton's Devils (1968)
Frank Dayton
Counterpoint (1968)
Victor
How to Steal the World (1968)
Rosie (1967)
Cabot Shaw
Gunfight in Abilene (1967)
Grant Evers
The Reluctant Astronaut (1967)
Maj. Fred Gifford
The Plainsman (1966)
Col. George A. Custer
Beau Geste (1966)
Lieutenant De Ruse
Harlow (1965)
Richard Manley
Dark Intruder (1965)
Brett Kingsford
Night Train to Paris (1964)
Alan Holiday
The Sheepman (1958)
Johnny Bledsoe, also known as Col. Stephen Bedford
Tammy and the Bachelor (1957)
Peter Brent
The Vagabond King (1956)
Thibault d'Aussigny
The Opposite Sex (1956)
Steve[n] Hilliard
Forbidden Planet (1956)
Commander Adams
Ransom! (1956)
Charlie Telfer

Producer (Feature Film)

Spy Hard (1996)
Executive Producer

Cast (Special)

Leslie Nielsen: Naked Laughter (2000)
Interviewee
Savage Garden (1997)
Narration
Savage Garden (1997)
Gardener; Host
Television's Comedy Classics (1997)
Host
The 22nd Annual People's Choice Awards (1996)
Presenter
Mr. Willowby's Christmas Tree (1995)
Mr Baxter
Cybermania '94: The Ultimate Gamer Awards (1994)
Host
Circus of the Stars Goes to Disneyland (1994)
Masters of Illusion: The Wizards of Special Effects (1994)
ABC's World's Funniest Commercials (1994)
Bob Hope's Birthday Memories (1994)
50th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1993)
Host
The Unknown Marx Brothers (1993)
Narrator
ABC Presents Krofft Late Night (1991)
Leslie Peters
All New Circus of the Stars & Side Show (1991)
The Naked Gun 2-1/2: Looking Down the Barrel of Comedy (1991)
The 3rd Annual International Rock Awards (1991)
Host
Starathon '90 (1990)
National Lampoon's Comedy Playoffs (1990)
Host
The 14th Annual Circus of the Stars (1989)
The 3rd Annual American Comedy Awards (1989)
Performer
Prime Times (1983)
Host
Twilight Theater (1982)
Amanda Fallon (1973)
Guilty Or Not Guilty (1966)
Gregg Collier

Cast (Short)

The Battle of Gettysburg (1956)
Narrator

Cast (TV Mini-Series)

Backstairs at the White House (1979)

Life Events

1949

Moved to New York City

1950

Made TV debut in the "Studio One" production, "Battleship Bismarck"

1954

Moved to Hollywood when put under contract by Paramount

1956

Played the ship's commander in the cult sci-fi movie, "Forbidden Planet"

1957

Starred opposite Debbie Reynolds in "Tammy and the Bachelor"

1957

Cast as Revolutionary War hero Francis Marion in "Swamp Fox," a limited series aired on "Walt Disney" (ABC)

1961

Headlined the ABC police drama series, "The New Breed"

1965

Portrayed Dr. Vincent Markham on the ABC primetime serial, "Peyton Place"

1966

Co-starred in the big screen remake of "Beau Geste"

1966

Played George Armstrong Custer in "The Plainsman"

1969

Headlined the NBC rotating series, "The Protectors"

1970

Cast as the head of a motion picture studio in "Bracken's World" (NBC)

1972

Hosted the syndicated documentary series, "The Explorers"

1972

Was the ship's captain in the "disaster" film, "The Poseidon Adventure"

1979

Portrayed the chief usher of the White House staff in the NBC miniseries, "Backstairs at the White House"

1979

Toured America in one-man stage show, "Darrow"

1980

First collaboration with the Zucker brothers, "Airplane!"

1982

Had featured role in the horror anthology film, "Creepshow"

1982

Starred as bumbling detective Frank Drebin on the cult ABC sitcom "Police Squad!"; only six episodes aired

1984

Had lead role of an aging health club owner in the short-lived ABC sitcom, "Shaping Up"

1986

Played recurring role of Max Muldoon, Mona's beau, on "Who's the Boss?" (ABC)

1987

Co-starred as Barbra Streisand's murder victim in "Nuts"

1988

Reprised television role of Frank Drebin in the big screen comedy, "The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad!"

1991

Again played Drebin in the sequel, "Naked Gun 2-1/2: The Smell of Fear"

1992

Played the man who wins the heart of Dorothy (Bea Arthur) in the finale of the NBC sitcom, "The Golden Girls"

1993

Published a fake autobiography, <i>Leslie Nielsen: The Naked Truth</i>

1994

Originated part of Mountie Buck Frobisher in an episode of the CBS series "Due South"; reprised role in 1996 episode

1994

Had yet another turn as Frank Drebin in "Naked Gun 33 1/3: The Final Insult"

1995

Played title role in Mel Brooks' "Dracula: Dead and Loving It"

1996

Starred in the spoof "Spy Hard"

1997

Had title role in live-action version of "Mr. Magoo"

1998

Played lead in the broad comedy, "Wrongfully Accused"

1999

Appeared as Dr. Chumley in the small screen remake of "Harvey"

2000

Portrayed an amnesiac Kris Kringle in "The Wonderful World of Disney" (ABC) presentation, "Santa Who?"

2002

Had featured role in "Men with Brooms"

2006

Played President Harris in the comedy "Scary Movie 4"

2007

Starred in the comedy film, "Christmas in Wonderland"

2008

Co-starred in the comedy spoof, "Superhero Movie"

Photo Collections

The Sheepman - Publicity Stills
Here are a few publicity stills from MGM's The Sheepman (1958), starring Glenn Ford and Shirley MacLaine. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Forbidden Planet - Lobby Card Set
Here is a set of Lobby Cards from Forbidden Planet (1956). Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Forbidden Planet Novelization
These are images from the 1956 Bantam Books novelization of the MGM film Forbidden Planet by W.J. Stuart.
Final Draft Screenplay for The Forbidden Planet (1956)
These are the first few pages of a "complete" or final draft of the screenplay for the 1956 MGM sci-fi film "The Forbidden Planet," dated March 10th, 1955. This script was likely a near final shooting script for the film.

Videos

Movie Clip

Forbidden Planet (1956) - This Planetary Force Aging linguist Morbius (Walter Pidgeon) is explaining the death of his wife and everyone else from his original mission to Commander Adams (Leslie Neilsen) and colleagues (Warren Stevens, Jack Kelly) when his knockout daughter Alta (Anne Francis) appears, in Forbidden Planet, 1956.
Naked Gun: From The Files Of Police Squad, The (1988) - I'm Lieutenant Frank Drebin The dumb and delightful opening from the Zucker/Abrahams/Zucker team that made Airplane, 1980, as Lt. Drebin (Leslie Nielsen) thumps all the current evil global actors, Gen. Amin, Chrmn. Arafat, Col. Qadhafi, Premier Gorbachev, the Ayatollah, etc., in The Naked Gun: From The Files Of Police Squad, 1988.
Naked Gun, The (1988) - You Can Learn A Lot Drebin (Leslie Nielsen) narrates from the screenplay by Jerry and David Zucker, Jim Abrahams and Pat Proft, arriving with difficulty at the lab where colleague Ed (George Kennedy) and forensic guy Ted (Ted Olsen) are investigating, in The Naked Gun: From The Files Of Police Squad, 1988.
Forbidden Planet - Face Of The Gorgon Stupendous sets by Arthur Lonergan as Morbius (Walter Pidgeon) gives Adams (Leslie Nielsen) and "Doc" (Warren Stevens) a tour of the "Krell" machinery, ending with a Greek myth reference, in Forbidden Planet, 1956.
Forbidden Planet (1956) - The Conquest And Colonization The animation, score and narration suggesting a landmark in Hollywood science fiction narrative and production values, the opening of Forbidden Planet, 1956, from MGM, with support from Disney animators, starring Leslie Nielsen, Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis and Robby the Robot.
Forbidden Planet - Blood And Fire And Thunder Disney animators loaned to MGM for this display of the "planetary force" facing Commander Adams (Leslie Nielsen) and crew, and awakening Dr. Morbius (Walter Pidgeon) and daughter Altaira (Anne Francis) in Forbidden Planet, 1956.
Poseidon Adventure, The (1972) - An Enormous Wall Of Water New Year’s eve, Leslie Nielsen at the helm as the wave hits, Shelley Winters, Jack Albertson, young Eric Shea, Carol Lynley, hip priest Gene Hackman, Ernest Borgnine, Stella Stevens among the revelers, plus director Ronald Neame’s famous skylight shot, in writer-producer Irwin Allen’s disaster hit, The Poseidon Adventure, 1972.
Opposite Sex, The (1956) - Open Season On Husbands Big scene for Joan Collins as showgirl Crystal (drawn from the Joan Crawford role in the 1939 original The Women), with trouper Pat (Carolyn Jones, Dean Jones the stage-hand), Leslie Nielsen her target and Dolores Gray and Joan Blondell catching on, in the musical re-make, The Opposite Sex, 1956.
Forbidden Planet (1956) - Welcome To Altair Four Space Cruiser C57D lands on Altair Four, Commander Adams (Leslie Nielsen), Doc (Warren Stevens) and Farman (Jack Kelly) among crew observing when Robby The Robot (voice by Marvin Miller) zips by offering a ride to meet survivors of the last human visit, in Forbidden Planet, 1956.
Opposite Sex, The (1956) - Young Man With A Horn At a party flashing back, and convinced that Steven (Leslie Nielsen) is cheating, June Allyson (as singer Kay) "remembers" what is actually an original written by George Stoll and Ralph Freed for this picture, featuring Harry James, in the re-make of The Women, The Opposite Sex, 1956.
Tammy And The Bachelor - If You Are Or If You Ain't When pilot Pete (Leslie Nielsen) finally wakes up, Tammy (Debbie Reynolds) is determined to find out whether the pilot she helped rescue from the bayou is married, in Tammy And The Bachelor, 1957.
Tammy And The Bachelor - Brentwood Pride Tammy (Debbie Reynolds), now quasi-orphaned, awakes in a plush bedroom at Brentwood where her bachelor friend Pete (Leslie Nielsen) explains affairs at the estate, in Tammy And The Bachelor, 1957.

Trailer

Viva Knievel! (1977) -- (Original Trailer) vivianievel_TR
Naked Gun: From The Files Of Police Squad, The (1988) -- (Original Trailer) Trailer for the first of the hit Leslie Nielsen features, derived from the failed TV series from the Zucker/Abrahams/Zucker team that made Airplane, (1980), with O.J. Simpson, Priscilla Presley and Ricardo Montalban, The Naked Gun: From The Files Of Police Squad, 1988.
Clay Pigeon (1971) -- (Original Trailer) Arlo Guthrie’s “I Could Be Singing,” featured in the film, is the background for the original trailer for the budget-challenged counter-culture crime oddity, with it’s impressive cast, Clay Pigeon, 1971, by would-be Hollywood maverick director and star Tom Stern, not the well-known cinematographer.
Forbidden Planet - (Original Trailer) A group of space troopers investigates the destruction of an earth colony on a remote planet in Forbidden Planet (1956), the sci-fi thriller that introduced Robby the Robot.
Airplane! - (Original Trailer) When a flight crew falls ill, the only man who can land the plane is afraid of flying in Airplane! (1980), a spoof of Zero Hour! (1957)."
How to Steal the World - (Original Trailer) Secret agent Napoleon Solo fights to stop a top-secret plot to conquer the world in How to Steal the World (1968).
Hot Summer Night - (Original Trailer) A hotshot reporter risks his life to land an interview with a notorious gangster in Hot Summer Night (1957) starring Leslie Nielsen.
Sheepman, The - (Original Trailer) A tough sheep farmer battles the local cattle baron for land and a beautiful woman in The Sheepman (1958) starring Glenn Ford and Shirley MacLaine.
Opposite Sex, The - (Original Trailer) June Allyson and Joan Collins star in MGM's 1956 musical remake of The Women (1940).

Family

Ingvard Nielsen
Father
Royal Canadian mounted policeman.
Maybelle Nielsen
Mother
Welsh; died in 1953.
Thea Nielsen
Daughter
Horse trainer. Born on July 15, 1960; mother, Sandy Nielsen.
Maura Nielsen
Daughter
Real estate developer. Born on November 29, 1962; mother, Sandy Nielsen.

Companions

Monica Bayar
Wife
Married in 1950; divorced in 1955.
Sandy Ullman
Wife
Married in 1958; divorced; mother of Nielsen's daughters.
Brooks Nielsen
Wife
Married in 1981; divorced in 1983.
Barbaree Earl
Companion
Together since c. 1983.

Bibliography

"Bad Golf My Way"
Leslie Nielsen and Henry Beard, Doubleday (1996)
"The Naked Truth"
Leslie Nielsen and David Fisher, Pocket Books (1993)

Notes

His official Web site is at http://www.amiamsterdam.on.ca/ln/.

"When I was twenty I was scared I'd be perceived as a country bumpkin . . . I found it necessary to cultivate a worldliness I really didn't possess, to protect myself against all my insecurities. People believed my act, and soon I was known as a serious actor who played serious roles . . . I spent the first four years waiting for the acting police to knock on my door, tell me I have no talent and send me back to Canada . . . I don't think I'm getting funnier, I'm getting freer. The more confident you become, the freer you are to become who you really are." --Leslie Nielsen quoted in Parade Magazine, November 20, 1994.