Holly Near


Biography

Actress-musician Holly Near made a splash in Hollywood both on and off-screen for three decades. Near began her acting career in film, appearing in such titles as the drama "Angel, Angel Down We Go" (1969) with Jennifer Jones, the Don Johnson drama "The Magic Garden of Stanley Sweetheart" (1970) and the crime flick "The Todd Killings" (1971) with Robert F Lyons. She also appeared in t...

Biography

Actress-musician Holly Near made a splash in Hollywood both on and off-screen for three decades. Near began her acting career in film, appearing in such titles as the drama "Angel, Angel Down We Go" (1969) with Jennifer Jones, the Don Johnson drama "The Magic Garden of Stanley Sweetheart" (1970) and the crime flick "The Todd Killings" (1971) with Robert F Lyons. She also appeared in the dramatic comedy "Minnie and Moskowitz" (1971) with Gena Rowlands and "FTA" (1972). She worked in television in her early acting career as well, including a part on "All in the Family" (CBS, 1970-79). She continued to act in productions like "The Weavers: Wasn't That a Time!" (1981), the documentary "In Our Hands" (1983) with Dr. Helen Caldicott and the Pete Seeger documentary "Medan vi annu lever" (1984). She also appeared in "The Women of Summer" (1985). Toward the end of her career, she tackled roles in the Martin Sheen documentary "Just One Step: The Great Peace March" (1989), the Chris Willliamson documentary "The Changer: A Record of the Times" (1991) and the dramedy "Dogfight" (1991) with River Phoenix. Near's music was most recently featured in "Soldiers in the Army of God" (HBO, 2000-01). Additionally, she appeared on the television special "Unauthorized Biography: Jane Fonda" (1988-89). Near also contributed music to "Nightbreaker" (TNT, 1998-99).

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Cult Of The Damned (a.k.a. Angel, Angel Down We Go) (1969) - I'm A Fairy Princess Shortly after the opening, a flashback to earlier in the life of troubled Tara-Nicole (Joan Calhoun in this scene, growing up to be Holly Near), at a restaurant with her warring super-wealthy parents (Charles Aidman, Jennifer Jones) with writer Robert Thom in his only outing as a director, in Cult Of The Damned, (a.k.a. Angel, Angel Down We Go), 1969.
Cult Of The Damned (1969) - All Sorts Of Tranquilizers Usually low-budget American International pictures shooting on location at the Getz-Hearst “Beverly House” in Beverly Hills, singer Bogart (Jordan Christopher) has the full attention of mother Astrid (Jennifer Jones) and daughter Tara Nicole (Holly Near), then another original song by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil in Cult Of The Damned, (a.k.a. Angel, Angel Down We Go), 1969.
Cult Of The Damned (a.k.a. Angel, Angel Down We Go) (1969) - The Fat Song Tara-Nicole (Holly Near), after a sexual encounter with singer Bogart (Jordan Christopher), by whom she was willingly abducted from her own debutante ball, meets his “new group,” Davey Davison, Lou Rawls and Roddy McDowall as Ana Livia, Joe and Santoro, and hears his new song for her (by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil), in Cult Of The Damned, (a.k.a. Angel, Angel Down We Go), 1969.
Cult Of The Damned (1969) - Open, My Parents Were Perfect The soundtrack doing much of the work, with voice over by Holly Near as rich and twisted Tara Nicole, the opening to American International’s shocker Cult Of The Damned, (a.k.a. Angel, Angel Down We Go), 1969, leading to Charles Aidman as her father in the shower, also starring Jennifer Jones.
Cult Of The Damned (a.k.a. Angel, Angel Down We Go) (1969) - Angel, Angel Down We Go At her coming-out party thrown by her super-rich parents in LA (Jennifer Jones, Charles Aidman), Tara-Nicole (Holly Near), home from finishing school in Switzerland and nervous about her weight, is dazzled by singer “Bogart” (Jordan Christopher), performing an original song by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, in American International’s Cult Of The Damned, (a.k.a. Angel, Angel Down We Go), 1969.

Bibliography