Ted Moore


Director Of Photography

Biography

Filmography

 

Cinematography (Feature Film)

Charles & Diana: A Royal Love Story (1982)
Director Of Photography
Priest of Love (1981)
Director Of Photography
Clash of the Titans (1981)
Director Of Photography
Dominique (1979)
Director Of Photography
Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger (1977)
Director Of Photography
Orca (1976)
Director Of Photography
The Man with the Golden Gun (1974)
Director Of Photography
The Story of Jacob and Joseph (1974)
Director Of Photography
Live and Let Die (1973)
Director Of Photography
The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973)
Director Of Photography
Psychomania (1973)
Cinematographer
Diamonds Are Forever (1971)
Director of Photography
Brotherly Love (1970)
Director of Photography
The Chairman (1969)
Director of Photography
The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1969)
Director of Photography
Prudence and the Pill (1968)
Director of Photography
Shalako (1968)
Director of Photography
The Last Safari (1967)
Director of Photography
A Man for All Seasons (1966)
Director of Photography
Johnny Nobody (1965)
Director of Photography
Thunderball (1965)
Director of Photography
The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders (1965)
Director of Photography
From Russia With Love (1964)
Director of Photography
Goldfinger (1964)
Director of Photography
Nine Hours to Rama (1963)
Director of Photographer, 2d unit
Dr. No (1963)
Director of Photography
Call Me Bwana (1963)
Director of Photography
The Day of the Triffids (1962)
Director of Photography
The Hellions (1962)
Director of Photography
Jazz Boat (1960)
Photography
Killers of Kilimanjaro (1960)
Photography
The Trials Of Oscar Wilde (1960)
Director Of Photography
Let's Get Married (1960)
Director Of Photography
The Bandit of Zhobe (1959)
Director of Photography
How to Murder a Rich Uncle (1958)
Photography
The Man Inside (1958)
Photography
High Flight (1958)
Photography
Tank Force (1958)
Photography
Pickup Alley (1957)
Director of Photography
Zarak (1956)
Director of Photography
Odongo (1956)
Director of Photography
Safari (1956)
2d unit
The Cockleshell Heroes (1956)
Director of Photography
The Gamma People (1956)
Director of Photography
A Prize of Gold (1955)
Director of Photography
Hell Below Zero (1954)
Camera Operator
The Black Knight (1954)
Camera Operator
The African Queen (1951)
Camera Operator

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Clash of the Titans (1981)
Dp/Cinematographer
The Man with the Golden Gun (1974)
Dp/Cinematographer
Live and Let Die (1973)
Dp/Cinematographer
The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973)
Dp/Cinematographer

Life Events

1930

Moved to England

Videos

Movie Clip

Clash Of The Titans (1981) - Cerberus Perseus (Harry Hamlin) on his quest with helmeted helpers comes across what appears to be a two-headed version of the three-headed Greek myth dog the Cerberus, in Clash Of The Titans, 1981, effects by Ray Harryhausen.
Clash Of The Titans (1981) - Last Of The Winged Horses Faced with the challenge of having to track a giant vulture, Perseus (Harry Hamlin) and his mystical poet pal Ammon (Burgess Meredith) sneak up and capture that last flying horse Pegasus (the others were killed by a rival of Zeus), so a big technical sequence for special effects giant Ray Harryhausen, in Clash Of The Titans 1981.
Live And Let Die (1973) - Nothing About My Future? Entering a Harlem restaurant (called “Fillet Of Soul”) gently pursuing possible cohorts of a suspicious Caribbean dictator, James Bond (Roger Moore) is snatched, meeting soothsayer Solitare (Jane Seymour), goon Tee Hee (Julius Harris), and the gangster “Mr. Big,” early in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - Did You Mess With That? SPOILER here in Yaphet Kotto’s Bond-villain performance, captured Bond (Roger Moore) is interrogated by Mr. Big, who wants to know whether he’s despoiled Solitare (Jane Seymour) and thereby destroyed her psychic powers, meanwhile discussing his own links to the mysterious dictator Kananga, in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - She Had The Power And Lost It Yaphet Kotto as still largely mysterious Caribbean dictator Dr. Kananga is pressing his resplendent tarot card reader Solitare (Jane Seymour) about recent failures in her prognostications about Bond (Roger Moore, in his first performance, in the 8th 007 feature), who is on an aerial stake-out with colleague Quarrel (Roy Stewart), in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - The Man Who Shares My Hairbrush In fictional San Monique, bumbling but decorative novice CIA operative Rosie (ex-model and Playboy “bunny” Gloria Hendry) joins Bond (Roger Moore, in his first portrayal of 007) hiring a boat to visit the dictator’s private island, captained by Quarrel (Roy Stewart), in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - Title Song, Insomnia, Sir? After three murders (of not-too-dashing likely-English guys) in the prologue, the title song by Paul & Linda McCartney, produced by George Martin, (which went to #2 on the Billboard U.S. chart, becoming by-far the most successful Bond theme ever) followed by M (Bernard Lee) intruding on 007 (Roger Moore, in his first appearance in the role) and a paramour (Madeline Smith), in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Diamonds Are Forever (1971) - Title Song, Plain Solid Work After an extensive action prologue, in which 007 apparently killed Blofeld, Shirley Bassey’s vocal for the title song by John Barry and Don Black, and Sean Connery as Bond appears to lack interest in more routine work, involving diamonds, explained by M (Bernard Lee), in Diamonds Are Forever, 1971.
Diamonds Are Forever (1971) - Who Is Your Floor? In Amsterdam, James Bond (Sean Connery), pretending to be jewel smuggler Peter Franks, engages the real one (Joe Robinson) in a muscular brawl in an elevator, with Tiffany (Jill St. John), whom we believe is buying his subterfuge, observing in Diamonds Are Forever, 1971.
Diamonds Are Forever (1971) - Your Troubles Are All Behind You... Captured again by Blofeld (Charles Gray), this time on what appears to be an oil rig off California, but is really the control center for his satellite laser weapon, 007 (Sean Connery) gets an assist from Tiffany (Jill St. John), who is only pretending to have flipped, in Diamonds Are Forever, 1971.
Diamonds Are Forever (1971) - Making Mud Pies After dispatching some minor evil-doers, James Bond (Sean Connery, returning in his sixth 007 feature) appears to have killed Blofeld (Charles Gray) in the pre-credits opening sequence, in Diamonds Are Forever, 1971, co-starring Jill St. John.
Thunderball (1965) - Do I Seem Healthy? Perhaps the only scene in which Bond (Sean Connery) ever shouts "Help!", strapped to a traction table by the irritable Patricia (Molly Peters) in Thunderball, 1965.

Trailer

Man With The Golden Gun, The (1974) -- (Original Trailer) A particularly literal representation of the title, in the trailer for the 9th James Bond feature, Roger Moore’s second appearance, with Christopher Lee as scary Scaramanga, and somewhat dual Bond-girls, Maud Adams and Britt Ekland, in The Man With The Golden Gun, 1974.
Live And Let Die (1973) -- (Original Trailer) Fans today might forget that Jane Seymour was “introduced” as a Bond girl in the eighth feature in the series, with Roger Moore in his first outing, and Yaphet Kotto the chief villain, with no trace in the trailer of the hit theme song by Paul & Linda McCartney and Wings, from Live And Let Die, 1973.
Goldfinger (1964) -- (Original Trailer) United Artists and producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli’s trailer for the hit third James Bond feature, starring Sean Connery, with Honor Blackman as Pussy Galore, Harold Sakata as Oddjob, and Gert Fröbe as the title character, in Goldfinger, 1964.
Thunderball (1965) -- (Original Trailer) Sean Connery as 007 winds up chasing nuclear bombs in the Bahamas, Terence Young directing, Claudine Auger as Domino, and Adolfo Celi as the villain Largo, in the fourth and biggest-yet James Bond feature, Thunderball, 1965.
Dr. No (1963) -- (Original Trailer) For the first James Bond feature, the original trailer, from United Artists, producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. “Cubby” Broccoli and director Terence Young, starring Sean Connery and Ursula Andress, Dr. No, 1963.

Bibliography