James Warner Bellah


Screenwriter

About

Also Known As
James Bellah
Birth Place
New York City, New York, USA
Born
September 14, 1899
Died
September 22, 1976
Cause of Death
Heart Attack

Biography

Novelist and journalist whose main contributions to cinema were not his (few) screenplays but the stories he provided for several notable John Ford films, particularly the 7th Cavalry trilogy: "Fort Apache" (1948), "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" (1949) and "Rio Grande" (1950)....

Biography

Novelist and journalist whose main contributions to cinema were not his (few) screenplays but the stories he provided for several notable John Ford films, particularly the 7th Cavalry trilogy: "Fort Apache" (1948), "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" (1949) and "Rio Grande" (1950).

Life Events

1927

Worked as foreign correspondent for Aero Digest

1933

First screen credit (from novel), "Dancing Lady"

1955

First film as co-writer (with John Twist), "The Sea Chase"

Videos

Movie Clip

Sea Chase, The (1955) - Ehrlich Was Like A Fox David Farrar narrates as British naval officer Napier, pursuing John Wayne, as the conflicted Captain Ehrlich of the German steamer Ergenstrasse, trying to avoid capture in the South Pacific in the early days of WWII, as his Nazi spy passenger Elsa (Lana Turner) is approached by his sneaky officer Kirchner (Lyle Bettger), in The Sea Chase, 1955.
Sea Chase, The (1955) - Against The New Regime Days before their countries are expected to go to war, British officer Napier (David Farrar) brings his German fiancee' Elsa (Lana Turner) to meet his old family friend, also-German Captain Ehrlich (John Wayne), a former naval officer who refused to become a Nazi, on his freighter docked at Sydney, in The Sea Chase, 1955.
Sea Chase, The (1955) - Muster All Hands Departing Sydney, Australia, just after the declaration of WWII, anti-Nazi German freighter captain Ehrlich (John Wayne) instructs his crew on avoiding British patrols, then tells Elsa (Lana Turner), an old acquaintance and Nazi spy whom he's been ordered to transport, to stay out of sight, in The Sea Chase, 1955.
Sea Chase, The (1953) - No Daydreaming Moored off a South Pacific island to collect wood to fuel their way to Chile, German steamer officers Kirchner and Schmidt (Lyle Bettger, John Qualen) are interrupted by captain Ehrlich (John Wayne), who has special instructions regarding their sexy spy passenger (Lana Turner), who is in turn impressed by his consideration for old soldier Schmidt (Paul Fix), in The Sea Chase, 1955.
Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The (1962) - I Hate Tricks, Pilgrim John Wayne as rough-hewn rancher Tom Doniphon has come to consider city-born lawyer Ranse (James Stewart) a rival for his girl, but also feels some duty to warn him against confronting the notorious outlaw, thus this famous scene from John Ford’s The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, 1962.
Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The (1962) - Print The Legend SPOILER in a way, Doniphon (John Wayne) finishes his pep talk and holds the door as Stoddard (James Stewart) launches his political career and, flashing back to "present day," editor Scott (Carleton Young) utters the famous line, in John Ford's The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, 1962.
Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The (1962) - That's My Steak Men fight over meat, with Ranse (James Stewart) waiting table, Liberty (Lee Marvin) making trouble, and Tom (John Wayne) booting Strother Martin, in an outrageous confrontation from John Ford's The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, 1962.
Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The (1962) - I'd Have Had A Bang-up Funeral Sen. and Mrs. Stoddard (James Stewart, Vera Miles) discover the minimal preparations for a friend's funeral, Pompey (Woody Strode) already mourning, Earle Hudgins and Andy Devine featured, early in John Ford's The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, 1962.
Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The (1962) - Western Law Veteran senator Ranse Stoddard (James Stewart) begins narrating the long flashback, recalling his arrival on the stagecoach and his first encounter with the bandit (Lee Marvin) in John Ford's The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, 1962.
She Wore A Yellow Ribbon (1949) - Opening, Prologue Rousing title sequence and unusually detailed prologue from She Wore A Yellow Ribbon, 1949, the second and only color entry in John Ford's legendary "Cavalry Trilogy," with Ben Johnson as the ubiquitous Trooper Tyree.
She Wore A Yellow Ribbon (1949) - Picknicking? Lt. Pennell (Harry Carey Jr.) and Miss Dandridge (Joanne Dru) are thwarted in their picnic plans first by Lt. Cohill (John Agar) then by Captain Brittles (John Wayne) in a famous scene from John Ford's She Wore A Yellow Ribbon, 1949.
She Wore A Yellow Ribbon (1949) - There May Be One Man A last bit of introductory narration as Sgt. Quincannon (Victor McLaglen) enters the quarters of about-to-retire Capt. Brittles (John Wayne) in the semi-comical opening scene from John Ford's She Wore A Yellow Ribbon, 1949.

Trailer

Bibliography