Martin Melcher


Producer

Biography

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Tunnel Of Love, The (1958) - Class of '79 From credits establishing Westport, Connecticut and title song by the leading lady, Doris Day and Richard Widmark arrive home, greeted by neighbors Gig Young and Elisabeth Fraser, opening The Tunnel Of Love, 1958.
Julie (1956) - That Doesn't Prove Anything Doris Day (title character), on the grounds of the Pebble Beach golf club as it appeared at the time, talks with concerned friend Cliff (Barry Sullivan) about the possibility that her new husband (Louis Jourdan) may have been involved in her previous husband's presumed suicide, in Julie, 1956.
Julie (1956) - Sick With Fright Now convinced that her husband Lyle (Louis Jourdan) murdered her previous husband and means to kill her, Doris Day (title character) contrives an escape from their isolated Carmel seaside home, complete with anxious narration, in Julie, 1956.
Julie (1956) - I Only Meant To Frighten You As Doris Day's theme song fades out, her title character unwillingly collects her husband Lyle (Louis Jourdan), following an incident we have not seen, shot at the Pebble Beach Links golf club, scolding him for his erratic behavior, and finds out there's more to come in Julie, 1956.
Glass Bottom Boat, The (1966) - Okay, Vladimir! Doris Day as Jennifer has her status established in conversation with Donna (Dee J. Thompson), on her first day as a tour guide at the lab run by big time scientist Templeton (Rod Taylor), whom she met at her part-time job, as a mermaid, Paul Lynde the security guard, early in The Glass Bottom Boat, 1966.
Lover Come Back (1961) - It Looks Down On Madison Avenue Carol (Doris Day) has forced a hearing before the Madison Avenue ethics-enforcing “Advertising Council,” not knowing that her target, Jerry Webster (Rock Hudson, not seen) has tricked her witness, dishy model Rebel (Edie Adams) into hiding his dubious practices, in Lover Come Back, 1961.
Pillow Talk (1959) - Title Song Cute graphics, the leading lady with the title tune by Buddy Pepper and Inez James, to Doris Day in the blue negligee and leading man Rock Hudson introducing the premise and the graphic gimmick, off to a rollicking start in their first picture together, in Pillow Talk, 1959.
Lover Come Back (1961) - I Wish I Were A Man Right Now! Ad man Jerry (Rock Hudson) is managing his neurotic boss and buddy Peter (Tony Randall), legacy owner of the agency, who's worried that competitor Carol (Doris Day) has filed a complaint, director Delbert Mann using the split-screen phone gimmick from Pillow Talk, 1959, early in Lover Come Back, 1961.
Move Over, Darling (1963) - I've Been There Before Nick (James Garner) with new wife (Polly Bergen) at the hotel where he honeymooned with presumed-dead Ellen (Doris Day), not knowing she's in the lobby, copying the elevator shot from My Favorite Wife, Fred Clark, Max Showalter and Eddie Quillan on staff, in the re-make Move Over, Darling, 1963.
Move Over, Darling (1963) - I'm Not Squirming! Having installed his believed-dead wife Ellen (Doris Day) in the next suite, Nick (James Garner) has to deal with his new-wife Bianca (Polly Bergen) on their wedding night, who’s both amorous and furious at his repeated departures, intending to tell her the news, in the re-make of My Favorite Wife, Move Over, Darling 1963.
Move Over, Darling (1963) - What About Binaca? At the hotel where they honeymooned, having seen each other in the lobby as he checked in with his new bride, Nick (James Garner) hurries to find Ellen (Doris Day), who has, on the day she was declared legally dead, returned after five years lost at sea, with no time to explain, in the remake of My Favorite Wife, Move Over, Darling 1963.
Move Over, Darling (1963) - Follow That Car! Following a contretemps at the Beverly Hills Hotel, Ellen (Doris Day) flees in a convertible as husband Nick (James Garner) grabs a cab, climaxing in Doris getting run through a car wash, in the 1963 re-make of My Favorite Wive, Move Over, Darling.

Companions

Doris Day
Wife
Actor, singer. Married 1951 until his death in 1968.

Bibliography