Andrew V. Mclaglen


Director
Andrew V. Mclaglen

About

Also Known As
Andrew Victor Mclaglen, Andrew Mclaglen
Birth Place
London, England, GB
Born
July 28, 1920
Died
August 30, 2014

Biography

This son of Academy Award-winning actor Victor McLaglen learned the craft of directing apprenticing with the likes of John Ford, Budd Boetticher and William A Wellman. Ford had directed his father's Oscar-winning performance in "The Informer" (1935) and given the elder McLaglen new life in the cavalry trilogy ("Fort Apache" 1948, "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" 1949 and "Rio Grande" 1950), wh...

Family & Companions

Veda Ann Borg
Wife
Actor. Married in 1946, divorced in 1957; second wife.
Sally Pierce
Wife
Married in 1957; divorced in 1979; third wife.

Biography

This son of Academy Award-winning actor Victor McLaglen learned the craft of directing apprenticing with the likes of John Ford, Budd Boetticher and William A Wellman. Ford had directed his father's Oscar-winning performance in "The Informer" (1935) and given the elder McLaglen new life in the cavalry trilogy ("Fort Apache" 1948, "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" 1949 and "Rio Grande" 1950), which brought the six-foot-seven-and-one-half-inch Andrew V McLaglen in contact with John Wayne, inaugurating their long association. The actor produced Boetticher's "Bullfighter and the Lady" (1951) and starred in Ford's "The Quiet Man" (1952) and Wellman's "The High and Mighty" (1954) and "Blood Alley" (1955), all with the younger McLaglen as assistant director. The 'Duke' would later star in four pictures helmed by Andrew, beginning with "McLintock!" (1963), sort of a Western "Taming of the Shrew" reteaming him with frequent co-star Maureen O'Hara, and including "The Undefeated" (1969), "Chisum" (1970) and "Cahill, United States Marshall" (1973).

McLaglen directed his first features ("Gun the Man Down" and "The Man in the Vault") in 1956, followed by "The Abductor" (1957), starring his father. He then signed a long-term contract with CBS-TV, where he became quite proficient at the helm of episodic Western fare (e.g., "Gunsmoke," "Have Gun--Will Travel" and "Rawhide"), as well as the courtroom drama series "Perry Mason." His feature reputation rests on the Westerns starring Wayne and "Shenandoah" (1965), a sentimental drama capturing the heartbreak of America's Civil War starring James Stewart which is arguably his best picture; but these films are memorable more for their performances than any particular McLaglen touch. With the exception of "Sahara" (1984), all of his features after 1976 were foreign affairs, the most notable being the British production of "The Wild Geese" (1978). The best of his later work was for the small screen, including "Louis L'Amour's 'The Shadow Riders'" (CBS, 1982), "The Dirty Dozen: Next Mission" (CBS, 1985) and the miniseries "The Blue and the Gray" (CBS, 1982) and "On Wings of Eagles" (NBC, 1986). His final feature efforts were the sequel "Return from the River Kwai" (1989) and the action thriller "Eye of the Widow" (1991), starring Oscar-winning character actor F. Murray Abraham. McLaglen died at his home in Friday Harbor, Washington on August 30, 2014 at the age of 94.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

L'Oeil de la Veuve (1991)
Director
Return to the River Kwai (1989)
Director
Dirty Dozen: The Next Mission (1985)
Director
Sahara (1984)
Director
Travis Mcgee: Empty Copper Sea (1983)
Director
The Shadow Riders (1982)
Director
The Sea Wolves (1980)
Director
Ffolkes (1980)
Director
Teil Steiner - Das Eiserne Kreuz 2 (1979)
Director
The Wild Geese (1978)
Director
Murder at the World Series (1977)
Director
Banjo Hackett: Roamin' Free (1976)
Director
The Last Hard Men (1976)
Director
Stowaway to the Moon (1975)
Director
Log of the Black Pearl (1975)
Director
Mitchell (1975)
Director
Cahill, U.S. Marshal (1973)
Director
something big (1971)
Director
One More Train to Rob (1971)
Director
Fools' Parade (1971)
Director
Chisum (1970)
Director
The Undefeated (1969)
Director
The Ballad of Josie (1968)
Director
Hellfighters (1968)
Director
The Devil's Brigade (1968)
Director
Bandolero! (1968)
Director
Monkeys, Go Home! (1967)
Director
The Way West (1967)
Director
The Rare Breed (1966)
Director
Shenandoah (1965)
Director
McLintock! (1963)
Director
The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come (1961)
Director
Freckles (1960)
Director
The Abductors (1957)
Director
Man in the Vault (1956)
Director
Gun the Man Down (1956)
Director
Blood Alley (1955)
Assistant Director
Track of the Cat (1954)
Assistant Director
The High and the Mighty (1954)
Assistant Director
Fort Vengeance (1953)
Assistant Director
Island in the Sky (1953)
Assistant Director
Plunder of the Sun (1953)
Assistant Director
Kansas Pacific (1953)
Assistant Director
Hellgate (1952)
Director
Wild Stallion (1952)
Assistant Director
Big Jim McLain (1952)
Assistant Director
Here Come the Marines (1952)
Assistant Director
Bullfighter and the Lady (1951)
Assistant Director

Cast (Feature Film)

Paris--Underground (1945)
Sergeant
Since You Went Away (1944)
Former plowboy

Producer (Feature Film)

Sahara (1984)
Executive Producer
something big (1971)
Producer
Fools' Parade (1971)
Producer
Seven Men from Now (1956)
Producer

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

Hondo (1954)
Unit Production Manager

Director (Special)

Royce (1976)
Director

Life Events

1925

Moved to the USA

1945

Began working as a production assistant at Republic Pictures

1951

Worked as an assistant director on Budd Boetticher's "Bullfighter and the Lady"; produced by John Wayne

1952

Assistant director to John Ford on "The Quiet Man"; starring Wayne, Maureen O'Hara and Victor McLaglen

1954

Served as assistant director to William A Wellman on "Track of the Cat", "The High and Mighty" and "Blood Alley"; the latter two starred John Wayne

1956

With Wayne's brother Robert Morrison, co-produced Boetticher's "Seven Men From Now"

1956

First feature films as director, "Gun the Man Down" and "Man in the Vault"

1957

Directed his father in "The Abductors"

1958

Directed his father in "The O'Hare Story" episode of "Have Gun--Will Travel"

1959

Helmed "Incident of the Shambling Man" episode of "Rawhide", starring his father

1963

First time directing Wayne, "McLintock!"

1965

Directed "Shenandoah", starring James Stewart

1967

Helmed Disney movie, "Monkeys Go Home!"

1969

Reteamed with Wayne for "The Undefeated"

1970

Third film with Wayne, "Chisum"

1973

Fourth and final film with Wayne, "Cahill, United States Marshall"

1975

TV-movie debut, "Stowaway to the Moon" (CBS)

1978

Helmed "The Wild Geese", a silly but entertaining action yarn starring Richards Burton and Harris, along with Roger Moore

1982

Directed "Louis L'Amour's 'The Shadow Riders'", a CBS movie starring Tom Selleck and Sam Elliott

1982

TV miniseries debut, "The Blue and the Gray" (CBS)

1984

Executive produced and directed "Sahara", starring Brooke Shields

1985

Helmed CBS movie sequel, "The Dirty Dozen: Next Mission", with Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine and Richard Jaeckel repeating their roles from the 1967 feature

1986

Last TV project to date, the NBC miniseries "On Wings of Eagles"

1991

Last feature to date, "L'oeil de la veuve/Eye of the Widow" (filmed in 1989 and 1990)

Videos

Movie Clip

Chisum (1970) - Open, Weary, Saddle Worn Unusual opening credits, with art by the fairly prominent Western painter Russ Vickers, lyrics by producer and screenwriter Andrew J. Fenady, voice by William Conrad, all setting up the star John Wayne, playing the minor New Mexico historical figure, surveying his domain, in Chisum, 1970.
Chisum (1970) - You Can't Buy Anything With Lead In 1870’s New Mexico, John Wayne the title character, rancher John Chisum, Ben Johnson his sidekick Pepper, confronting rustlers led by Neemo (Lloyd Battista), with support from neighbor Tunstall (Patric Knowles) and a new employee, William Bonney (Geoffrey Deuel), in Chisum, 1970.
Chisum (1970) - That Sounded Like A Threat Pretty far into the narrative here, Lincoln, New Mexico financier-villain Murphy (Forrest Tucker) has just installed a new sheriff (Christopher George) for the purpose of arresting Billy The Kid, who’s one of the good guys, allied with John Wayne, the title character based on a real person, in Chisum, 1970.
Chisum (1970) - Lonely Wind Pure reflection here, John Wayne as the title character and historical figure John Chisum, on his ranch around the Pecos River valley in the New Mexico territory, reflecting on personal history with his fictional niece (Lynda Day, later George), visiting from back east, in Chisum, 1970, Andrew V. McLaglen directing.
Shenandoah (1965) - A Lot Of Noisy Silence Exposition, introducing the cast, during the Civil War, James Stewart as farmer and father Charlie Anderson addresses his sons, Philip Alford entering, then Glenn Corbett, James McMullan, Patrick Wayne (Duke’s son), Charles Robinson, and Tim McIntire, his daughter (Rosemary Forsyth) and daughter-in-law (Katharine Ross) silent, early in Shenandoah, 1965.
Shenandoah (1965) - Women Are Like That Virginia widower farmer Charlie Anderson (James Stewart), abstaining from the Civil War, relates to his soon-to-be son-in-law, Confederate recruit Sam (Doug McClure), while the bride (Rosemary Forsyth), attempts to understand her sister-in-law (Katharine Ross), in Shenandoah, 1965, from James Lee Barrett’s original screenplay.
Shenandoah (1965) - A Horrible Thing To Behold His youngest son taken prisoner as a (wrongly) suspected Confederate, neutral Virginia farmer Charlie (James Stewart) consults with his eldest son (Glenn Corbett) about rescue options, then visits with his daughter-in-law (Katharine Ross) and his first grandchild, Andrew V. McLaglen directing, in Shenandoah< 1965.
Shenandoah (1965) - These Are My Sons A more explicit expression by James Stewart, as Virginia farmer Charlie Anderson, maintaining firm neutrality during the Civil War, just barely civil toward a Confederate officer (Tom Simcox) out to recruit his sons (Glenn Corbett, Patrick Wayne, James McMullan) et al, in Shenandoah, 1965.
Cahill, United States Marshal (1973) - Any Of You Wanna Surrender? Snow on a dark soundstage, Scott Walker and crew (Rayford Barnes, Dan Kemp) sensing the arrival of John Wayne (title character), who dismisses Indian visitor Lightfoot (Neville Brand) before doing business, opening Cahill, United States Marshal, 1973, directed by Andrew V. McLaglen.
Cahill, United States Marshal (1973) - It Was A Friendly Fight John Wayne (title character) returns to Valentine, Texas where Hank Worden is the station master, not knowing jailed Fraser (George Kennedy) and Strother (Morgan Paull) have involved his own son (Gary Grimes) in robbery and murder, Jackie Coogan the drunk, early in Cahill, United States Marshal, 1973.
Cahill, United States Marshal (1973) - Austin To El Paso Widower John Wayne (title character) appoints Mrs. Green (Marie Windsor) to care for his younger son (Clay O’Brien), then takes his deputized older boy (Gary Grimes), who’s already in thrall to murderous bandit George Kennedy, to hire tracker Lightfoot (Neville Brand), in Cahill, United States Marshal, 1973.
McLintock! - Katherine George Washington McLintock (John Wayne) visits his estranged wife Katherine (Maureen O'Hara) in her hotel room, where they argue about their daughter, in McLintock!, 1963.

Trailer

Chisum (1970) -- (Original Trailer) The star is just about the only emphasis in the original trailer for director Andrew V. McLaglen’s 1970 John Wayne Western, Chisum.
Devil's Brigade, The - (Original Trailer) Experienced Canadian soldiers and misfit Americans join to beat the Nazis in The Devil's Brigade (1968).
Bullfighter and the Lady - (Original Trailer) An American (Robert Stack) takes up bullfighting to impress the ladies but learns to respect the sport in Budd Boetticher's Bullfighter and the Lady (1951).
Big Jim McLain - (Original Trailer) An investigator (John Wayne) for the House Un-American Activities Committee takes on Communists in Hawaii in Big Jim McLain (1952).
Cahill, United States Marshal - (Original Trailer) John Wayne stars as a tough lawman who has to bring in his own sons for train robbery in Cahill, U.S. Marshall (1973).
Rare Breed, The - (Original Trailer) In this Western with breeding, James Stewart and Maureen O'Hara fight to take a rare English bull to Texas in The Rare Breed (1966).
High and the Mighty, The -- (Original Trailer) The passengers and crew of an imperiled airliner reflect on their lives in William Wellman's The High and the Mighty (1954), Starring John Wayne.
Track Of The Cat - (Original Trailer) A panther haunts a dysfunctional pioneer family in Track of the Cat (1954) starring Robert Mitchum.
Blood Alley - (Original Trailer) John Wayne breaks out of a Chinese jail and dodges Communist agents through the road to Hong Kong called Blood Alley, 1955, with Lauren Bacall in tow.
Shenandoah - (Original Trailer) James Stewart is a Virginia farmer who refuses to take sides in the Civil War even as it rages around him in Shenandoah (1965).
Plunder of the Sun - (Original Trailer) Aztec ruins hold the secret of a long-buried treasure in Plunder of the Sun (1953) starring Glenn Ford and Patricia Medina (Mr. Arkadin).
Island in the Sky -- (Original Trailer) it's a saga of survival as a WWII transport plane crashes in the Canadian wilderness in William Wellman's Island in the Sky (1953).

Family

Victor McLaglen
Father
Actor, boxer. Won Oscar for "The Informer"; born in 1883; died in 1959; lasted six rounds with heavyweight champ Jack Johnson in Vancouver.
Enid Mary McLaglen
Mother
Sharon McLaglen
Daughter
Andrew Victor McLaglen Jr
Son
Josh McLaglen
Son
Assistant director. First assistant director to James Cameron on "Titantic" (1997); appeared in his father's "Chisum" (1970).
Mary McLaglen
Daughter
Model, production manager, producer. Executive produced "Hope Floats" (1998); appeared in father's "Chisum"; worked crew on several of his films, beginning with "The Wild Geese" (1977).

Companions

Veda Ann Borg
Wife
Actor. Married in 1946, divorced in 1957; second wife.
Sally Pierce
Wife
Married in 1957; divorced in 1979; third wife.

Bibliography