Horace Mccoy


Biography

Horace McCoy's talent for screenwriting gave him a Hollywood career. McCoy's career beginnings can be traced back to writing for films such as "Fury of the Jungle" (1933), "Dangerous Crossroads" (1933) and "Parole!" (1936). He also appeared in "King of the Newsboys" (1938) and the Akim Tamiroff dramatic adaptation "Dangerous to Know" (1938). In the latter half of his career, McCoy ...

Biography

Horace McCoy's talent for screenwriting gave him a Hollywood career. McCoy's career beginnings can be traced back to writing for films such as "Fury of the Jungle" (1933), "Dangerous Crossroads" (1933) and "Parole!" (1936). He also appeared in "King of the Newsboys" (1938) and the Akim Tamiroff dramatic adaptation "Dangerous to Know" (1938). In the latter half of his career, McCoy wrote the Susan Hayward drama "The Lusty Men" (1952), the Jane Russell western "Montana Belle" (1952) and the drama "Bad For Each Other" (1954) with Charlton Heston. He also appeared in the Victor Mature crime flick "Dangerous Mission" (1954). McCoy was most recently credited in "Un Linceul n'a pas de poches" (1974) with Jean-Pierre Mocky. McCoy passed away in December 1955 at the age of 58.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

Texas Lady (1955)
Dialogue Director

Writer (Feature Film)

Un Linceul n'a pas de poches (1974)
Book As Source Material
Rage at Dawn (1955)
Screenwriter
The Road to Denver (1955)
Screenwriter
Texas Lady (1955)
Story and Screenplay
Dangerous Mission (1954)
Screenwriter
Bad for Each Other (1954)
Screenwriter
Dangerous Mission (1954)
Story
Bronco Buster (1952)
Screenwriter
Montana Belle (1952)
Screenwriter
The Lusty Men (1952)
Written for Screen by
The World in His Arms (1952)
Additional Dialogue
The Turning Point (1952)
Based on a Story by
The Fireball (1950)
Screenwriter
The Fireball (1950)
Original Story
The Fabulous Texan (1947)
Screenwriter
There's Something About a Soldier (1943)
Original Screenplay
Appointment in Berlin (1943)
Screenwriter
Flight for Freedom (1943)
Story
Valley of the Sun (1942)
Screenwriter
Gentleman Jim (1942)
Screenwriter
Texas (1941)
Screenwriter
Wild Geese Calling (1941)
Screenwriter
Western Union (1941)
Contr to dial
Queen of the Mob (1940)
Screenwriter
Women Without Names (1940)
Screenwriter
Texas Rangers Ride Again (1940)
Original story and Screenplay
Parole Fixer (1940)
Screenwriter
Undercover Doctor (1939)
Screenwriter
Television Spy (1939)
Screenwriter
Island of Lost Men (1939)
Screenwriter
Persons in Hiding (1939)
Screenwriter
Hunted Men (1938)
Screenwriter
Dangerous to Know (1938)
Screenwriter
Prison Farm (1938)
Contr to Screenplay const
King of the Newsboys (1938)
Original Story
Great Guy (1937)
Additional Dialogue
Postal Inspector (1936)
Screenwriter
Parole! (1936)
Screenwriter
Postal Inspector (1936)
Original Story
The Trail of the Lonesome Pine (1936)
Adaptation
Rendezvous (1935)
Contract Writer
Speed Wings (1934)
Story and Screenplay
Hold the Press (1933)
Story
Her Resale Value (1933)
Story
Dangerous Crossroads (1933)
Story
Soldiers of the Storm (1933)
Dial
Fury of the Jungle (1933)
Story

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Texas (1941) - Texas Ain't That Big Dan (William Holden) is off roping dinner when buddy Tod (Glenn Ford) gets grabbed by lawmen, not buying his true story of having robbed the bandits, so they wind up parting on their first night in the new territory, in Texas, 1941.
Bad For Each Other (1954) - Five Miles From Pittsburgh Opening with Charlton Heston as army doctor Tom narrating, exposition as he's greeted by Doc Scobee and druggist Upham (Rhys Williams, Earl Lee), then confronted by an old pal (Chris Alcaide) before visiting mom (Mildred Dunnock), in Bad For Each Other, 1954, also starring Lizabeth Scott.
Bad For Each Other (1954) - I Saw Him First Just home army doctor Tom (Charlton Heston) is in a hurry to clear the name of his brother who died in a mining incident, Lizabeth Scott "Helen," the hostess and daughter of mine owner Reasonover (Ray Collins), with Lydia Clarke, Heston's wife, the woozy guest, in Bad For Each Other, 1954.
Bad For Each Other (1954) - If It's Not Too Small Suddenly acting wolf-ish, army doctor Tom (Charlton Heston), back in his hometown and having learned his late brother left the family in debt, with divorcee Helen (Lizabeth Scott), at whose party he was a hit the night before, in Bad For Each Other, 1954, directed by Irving Rapper.
Gentleman Jim (1942) - This Is A Break For Me San Francisco bank clerk Errol Flynn (as Jim Corbett, title character) just got a raise, having expected to get fired for being seen at a boxing match, showing off for pal Walter (Jack Carson), Miss Ware (Alexis Smith, her first scene) and “Pop” (Alan Hale), early in Raoul Walsh’s Gentleman Jim, 1942.
Gentleman Jim (1942) - Come Out Fighting San Franciscan Errol Flynn (title character, Jim Corbett), cited by experts as among the most naturally gifted actors ever to play a fighter, squares off with Burke (Jack Foster) a former champ, Jack Carson, Alexis Smith, Alan Hale, Arthur Shields supporting, in Warner Bros.’ Gentleman Jim, 1942.
Gentleman Jim (1942) - If You Were My Girl Errol Flynn as title character Jim Corbett, still just a San Francisco local hero, stands by as Vicky Ware (Alexis Smith) meets the touring world champ Sullivan (Ward Bond), then tangles with her and her less virile boyfriend (John Loder), in Raoul Walsh’s fanciful bio-pic Gentleman Jim, 1942.
Gentleman Jim (1942) - You've Got A Good Build Still schmoozing affluent Miss Ware (Alexis Smith), who’s agreed to show handsome hustler Errol Flynn (title character) San Francisco’s Olympic Club, in the gym meets the judge (Wallis Clark) whom he did a favor, and Brit expert Watson (Rhys Williams), in the bio-pic Gentleman Jim, 1942.
Lusty Men, The (1952) - Wildest Show On Earth Incorporating some genuine rodeo footage, director Nicholas Ray and photographer Lee Garmes create the lonesome opening for Robert Mitchum (as cowboy "Jeff McCloud") in one of his most comfortable roles, in The Lusty Men, 1952, also starring Susan Hayward and Arthur Kennedy.
Lusty Men, The (1952) - Different Kind Of Buzz Ranch cow-hand and rodeo fanatic Wes (Arthur Kennedy) and wife Louise (Susan Hayward) are entertaining their new friend, has-been rodeo rider Jeff McCloud (Robert Mitchum), who’s just been hired on, in Nicholas Ray's The Lusty Men, 1952.
Lusty Men, The (1952) - Found You In A Tamale Joint Fiery Louise (Susan Hayward) decides to visit ex-rodeo rider Jeff (Robert Mitchum), wrongly convinced that he’s behind her husband’s decision to quit the ranch where they both work and take up rodeo riding, to earn the money to buy a house, in Nicholas Ray’s The Lusty Men, 1952.
Lusty Men, The (1952) - Strong Back And A Weak Mind Somewhat washed-up rodeo rider Jeff McCloud (Robert Mitchum) has dropped by the house where he grew up, meeting geezer Jeremiah (Burt Mustin), when ranch hand Wes and wife Louise (Arthur Kennedy, Susan Hayward), who want to buy the place, turn up, in Nicholas Ray's The Lusty Men, 1952.

Bibliography