James Mason


Actor
James Mason

About

Also Known As
James Neville Mason
Birth Place
Yorkshire, England, GB
Born
May 15, 1909
Died
July 27, 1984
Cause of Death
Heart Attack

Biography

Gifted with one of the most mellifluous and distinctive voices of his era, James Mason managed to convey volumes of emotion while often remaining surprisingly understated. Following some stage experience and roles in British B-pictures, Mason became a star in his homeland via films like "The Man in Grey" (1943), "The Wicked Lady" (1945), and "Odd Man Out" (1947) and was eventually lured ...

Photos & Videos

The Marriage-Go-Round - Movie Posters
Lord Jim - Movie Poster
Pandora and the Flying Dutchman - Movie Posters

Family & Companions

Pamela Kellino
Wife
Actor, columnist, writer, TV host. Born 1916; married 1941, divorced 1964; daughter of producer Maurice Ostrer; formerly married to director Roy Kellino, with whom Pamela and Mason had formed Gamma Productions in 1938; died on June 29, 1996 at the age of 80.
Clarissa Kaye
Wife
Actor. Married August 8, 1971.

Bibliography

"Before I Forget"
James Mason (1981)
"The Films of James Mason"
Clive Hirschhorn, L.S.P. Books (1975)
"The Cats in Our Lives"
James Mason and Pamela Mason (1949)
"James Mason: An Authorised Biography"
Jno P Monaghan, World Film Publications (1947)

Notes

Mason is not to be confused with American actor James Mason (1890-1959), who was busy in American silent film but whose career declined with the advent of talking pictures.

Biography

Gifted with one of the most mellifluous and distinctive voices of his era, James Mason managed to convey volumes of emotion while often remaining surprisingly understated. Following some stage experience and roles in British B-pictures, Mason became a star in his homeland via films like "The Man in Grey" (1943), "The Wicked Lady" (1945), and "Odd Man Out" (1947) and was eventually lured to Hollywood. His performances in "The Desert Fox: The Story of Rommel" (1951), "A Star is Born" (1954), "North by Northwest" (1959), and "Lolita" (1962) ranked amongst his very finest. He also appeared in such projects as "Heaven Can Wait" (1978), "Murder by Decree" (1979), and "The Verdict" (1982), all of which made excellent use of attributes that had long endeared Mason to audiences worldwide. Mason's uniqueness and versatility were his greatest assets and served him well throughout his career, particularly when he aged into being one of the finest character players in cinema.

James Neville Mason was born in Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England on May 15, 1909. Following his graduation from Cambridge University, Mason seemed poised for a career in architecture, but the experience of acting in several of Cambridge's dramatic productions prompted him to more thoroughly explore performing. West End exposure led to Mason appearing regularly at the Old Vic Theater in London and with the Dublin-based Gate Theatre Company. He made a very inauspicious movie debut in a 1933 movie directed by Alexander Korda, who fired Mason not long into shooting and recast his role. Thus, Mason's official cinematic bow actually came two years later in the low-budget crime drama "Late Extra" (1935), but the intelligent and well-spoken young actor quickly progressed to starring roles in other "Quota Quickies," along with supporting assignments in grander efforts like "Fire Over England" (1937) and "Return of the Scarlet Pimpernel" (1937). He also became one of the first British actors seen on the brand new medium of television when he was featured in a handful of live dramas broadcast on the BBC in 1938 and 1939.

While starring in the thriller "I Met a Murderer" (1939), Mason fell in love co-star Pamela Kellino, wife of the film's director, Roy Kellino. After separating from her husband, she wed Mason in 1941. During that time, Mason also raised some eyebrows by registering with the British government as a conscientious objector, a move that alienated him from his family for a number of years. Following some additional stage work, he really began to hit his stride in the movie world via roles in pictures like "The Night Has Eyes" (1942) and "Thunder Rock" (1942). Genuine notoriety came via his sadistic upper class antagonist in "The Man in Grey" (1943), and subsequent turns in "The Seventh Veil" (1945) and "The Wicked Lady" (1945) further solidified Mason's reputation and popularity with audiences. He was also particularly well utilized as a determined I.R.A. member in Carol Reed's superb thriller "Odd Man Out" (1947). Thanks to projects such as these, Mason was voted the most popular British star from 1944 through 1947. He eventually succumbed to overtures from Hollywood and relocated to America, but opted to remain a free agent, rather than be locked down by the often restrictive Hollywood contract player system of the time. Mason also accepted an invitation to perform on Broadway, portraying David in the play "Bathsheba" (1947).

However, movies remained his primary focus and Mason would not return to the Great White Way for more than 30 years. Wife Pamela Mason was one of his co-stars in "Bathsheba" and the pair authored the humorous and affectionate book The Cats in Our Lives (1949). Mason half-apologetically stated that he wrote it strictly as a way to make money during a slow patch in his career, but he genuinely loved cats and owned a dozen at one point. Although he occasionally returned to England for local productions, Mason concentrated mainly on Hollywood assignments, which earned him snooty criticism from former colleagues who felt that he was more concerned with money than advancing himself as an actor. Mason copped to the financial incentive years later in an interview, but still showed them up with a series of excellent performances in some fine films, beginning with his turn as celebrated tactician Field Marshall Erwin Rommel in the World War II drama "The Desert Fox: The Story of Rommel" (1951). He was also strikingly good as a valet selling secrets to the Nazis in the superior spy thriller "5 Fingers" (1952), made for the perfect embodiment of Brutus in Joseph L. Mankiewicz's all-star version of "Julius Caesar" (1953), and impressed once again via an encore as Rommel in "The Desert Rats" (1953).

Mason's brilliant, but fanatical Captain Nemo ranked among the highlights of Walt Disney's big-budget epic "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" (1954) and the actor earned an Academy Award nomination for his moving performance as alcoholic fallen star Norman Maine in the first remake of "A Star is Born" (1954), co-starring an equally magnificent Judy Garland. That year, Mason also made another rare return to the stage when invited by Canada's Stratford Festival to star in their productions of "Measure for Measure" and "Oedipus Rex." In the wake of middling reviews, he decided to return to movies and deftly rode an emotional rollercoaster in "Bigger than Life" (1956), an early depiction of prescription drug addiction that found Mason convincingly swinging from wild euphoria to paranoia induced threats of violence.

As he progressed further into middle age, Mason became a much desired character player. He gave one of his most understated and wholly effective performances as the cultured villain responsible for Cary Grant's travails in Alfred Hitchcock's classic "North by Northwest" (1959) and Mason's customary degree of authority and persuasiveness helped viewers to overlook the occasional juvenile silliness of "Journey to the Center of the Earth" (1959). In the midst of all that activity, Mason suffered a heart attack in 1959, but had no lasting ill effects and soon resumed working. He was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his film and television achievements in 1960 and gave a remarkable (and remarkably brave) turn as pathetic pedophile Humbert Humbert in Stanley Kubrick's controversial adaptation of "Lolita" (1962). During that time, Mason moved to Switzerland, citing tax concerns as one of the main factors in his decision, but he was also candid in his dislike of Los Angeles and the whole nature of Hollywood.

In 1964, Mason filed for divorce, alleging infidelity on his wife's part. However, it was Pamela Mason who emerged victorious in the end, winning such a large settlement that he was effectively wiped out. In need of money, Mason agreed to appear in some less than stellar films in the years that followed, but also continued to operate at the height of his craft in more ambitious fare like the historical adventure "Lord Jim" (1965) and the hit romantic comedy "Georgy Girl" (1966), for which he earned a second Oscar nomination. Luckily for Mason, much of the worst work he did during that era - notably, the disastrous 1970 black comedy "The Yin and the Yang of Mr. Go" - was not widely seen. However, that was not always the case. In regards to the spaghetti Western "Bad Man's River" (1972), Mason stated that he had signed on to the lowbrow action comedy for some quick cash and a trip to Spain. Thinking it would never be widely distributed, he was mortified when "Bad Man's River" got a large and well-publicized theatrical release in England.

Whatever damage was done to Mason's reputation by these weak movies was fairly minimal, thanks to the fine dramatic turns he continued to give in productions like the twisty movie industry mystery "The Last of Sheila" (1973) and the large scale made-for-TV feature "Frankenstein: The True Story" (NBC, 1973). In keeping with the established pattern in the American phase of his career, that work was followed by his casting as a slave owner in the embarrassingly racist and inane exploitation film "Mandingo" (1975), perhaps the nadir of Mason's entire career. Good fortune soon smiled upon him again, however, and he was wonderful as an otherworldly bureaucrat in "Heaven Can Wait" (1978), Warren Beatty's popular remake of the 1940s classic "Here Comes Mr. Jordan" (1941), effectively unsettling as an exiled Nazi in "The Boys from Brazil" (1978), and offered an effectively contrasted Dr. Watson to Christopher Plummer's Sherlock Holmes in the underrated mystery "Murder by Decree" (1979).

After an absence from the stage of more than 20 years, Mason headlined the Broadway play "Faith Healer" (1979), opposite his second wife, Clarissa Kaye-Mason (an Australian actress whom he married in 1971), but it attracted little notice and closed after only 20 performances. As the 1980s dawned, Mason published his autobiography entitled Before I Forget (1981) and gave his finest late career turn as Paul Newman's imposingly formidable courtroom foe in "The Verdict" (1982), earning a third and final Academy Award Nomination. When Paul Scofield broke his leg in an accident during the production of "The Shooting Party" (1985), Mason stepped in to replace the stage veteran as the lead in a middling adaptation of Isabel Colegate's novel about the change in British society brought about by World War I. "The Shooting Party" turned out to be Mason's final motion picture. He suffered a heart attack at his home in Vevey, Switzerland and was taken to the University Hospital of Lausanne, where he died on July 27, 1984. In his will, Mason left everything to Kaye-Mason with the understanding that Portland and Morgan Mason, the two children from his first marriage, would then receive what remained after her passing. However, when Kaye-Mason died in 1994, it was revealed that she had put Mason's £15 million estate into a trust apparently overseen by the Sathya Sai Baba religious sect. In November 2000, after much legal wrangling and more than 15 years having passed since his death, the children were able to claim Mason's ashes, which had been secured inside a bank vault in Switzerland. The actor's remains were then buried in a cemetery on the shores of Lake Geneva.

By John Charles

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

Unknown Chaplin (1986)
Narrator
The Assisi Underground (1985)
The Shooting Party (1984)
Sir Randolph Nettleby
Alexandre (1983)
Yellowbeard (1983)
Evil Under The Sun (1982)
Odell Gardener
Ivanhoe (1982)
Isaac Of York
A Dangerous Summer (1982)
Ingles
The Verdict (1982)
Ffolkes (1980)
Admiral Sir Francis Brinsden
Bloodline (1979)
The Water Babies (1979)
Grimes
Murder by Decree (1979)
The Passage (1979)
Sherlock Holmes and Saucy Jack (1979)
The Boys From Brazil (1978)
Eduard Seibert
Cross Of Iron (1977)
Colonel Brandt
Homage to Chagall - The Colours of Love (1977)
Narration (English)
People of the Wind (1976)
Narration
Paura in citta (1976)
Inside Out (1976)
Ernst Furben
Voyage Of The Damned (1976)
People of the Wind (1976)
Narrator
Autobiography of a Princess (1975)
Cyril Sahib
Mandingo (1975)
Gente di rispetto (1975)
La Citta sconvolta - caccia spietato ai rapitori (1975)
The Destructors (1974)
11 Harrowhouse (1974)
Cold Sweat (1974)
Ross
Great Expectations (1974)
Magwich
The Mackintosh Man (1973)
Sir George Wheeler
The Last Of Sheila (1973)
Philip
Bad Man's River (1972)
Child's Play (1972)
Jerome Malley
Hunt the Man Down (1971)
Age of Consent (1969)
Bradley Morahan
Mayerling (1969)
Emperor Franz Josef
The Uninhibited (1968)
Pascal Regnier
Duffy (1968)
J. C. Calvert
Cop-Out (1968)
John Sawyer
The Sea Gull (1968)
Trigorin
The Deadly Affair (1967)
Charles Dobbs
The Blue Max (1966)
Count von Klugermann
Georgy Girl (1966)
James
Lord Jim (1965)
Gentleman Brown
Genghis Khan (1965)
Kam Ling
Torpedo Bay (1964)
Captain Blayne
The Pumpkin Eater (1964)
Bob Conway
The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964)
Timonides
Tiara Tahiti (1963)
Capt. Brett Aimsley
Escape from Zahrain (1962)
Johnson
Lolita (1962)
Humbert Humbert
Hero's Island (1962)
Jacob Webber
The Marriage-Go-Round (1960)
Paul Delville
A Touch of Larceny (1960)
Commander Max "Rammer" Easton
The Trials Of Oscar Wilde (1960)
Edward Carson
Journey to the Center of the Earth (1959)
Prof. Oliver Lindenbrook
North by Northwest (1959)
Phillip Vandamm
Cry Terror! (1958)
Jim Molner
The Decks Ran Red (1958)
Capt. Edwin B. Rumill
Island in the Sun (1957)
Maxwell Fleury
Bigger Than Life (1956)
Editor Avery
Forever, Darling (1956)
The Guardian Angel
Prince Valiant (1954)
Sir Brack
A Star Is Born (1954)
Norman Maine
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954)
Capt. Nemo
Botany Bay (1953)
Capt. Paul Gilbert
Julius Caesar (1953)
Brutus
The Desert Rats (1953)
[Field Marshal Erwin] Rommel
The Story of Three Loves (1953)
Charles Coudray
The Man Between (1953)
Ivo
The Tell-Tale Heart (1953)
Narrator
Face to Face (1952)
Captain
5 Fingers (1952)
Ulysses Diello, also known as Cicero
The Prisoner of Zenda (1952)
Rupert of Hentzau
Lady Possessed (1952)
[Jimmy] Del Palma
Pandora and the Flying Dutchman (1952)
Hendrick van der Zee
The Desert Fox (1951)
Field Marshal Erwin Rommel
East Side, West Side (1950)
Brandon Bourne
One Way Street (1950)
[Dr.] Frank Matson
Caught (1949)
Larry Quinada
The Reckless Moment (1949)
Martin Donnelly
Madame Bovary (1949)
Gustave Flaubert
Hatter's Castle (1948)
Dr. Renwick
Odd Man Out (1947)
Johnny
Hotel Reserve (1945)
Peter Vadassy
They Were Sisters (1945)
The Wicked Lady (1945)
Captain Jerry Jackson
The Seventh Veil (1945)
Nicholas
A Place of One's Own (1945)
Fanny By Gaslight (1944)
The Bells Go Down (1943)
They Met in the Dark (1943)
The Man in Grey (1943)
Lord Rohan
Secret Mission (1942)
Thunder Rock (1942)
The Night Has Eyes (1942)
I Met a Murderer (1939)
The Return of the Scarlet Pimpernel (1938)
Jean Tallien
Fire over England (1937)
Hillary Vane
Catch as Catch Can (1937)
The Mill On The Floss (1937)
The High Command (1937)
Twice Branded (1936)
Prison Breaker (1936)
The Secret of Stamboul (1936)
Troubled Waters (1936)
Blind Man's Bluff (1936)
Late Extra (1935)

Writer (Feature Film)

Lady Possessed (1952)
Screenwriter
I Met a Murderer (1939)
Screenwriter

Producer (Feature Film)

Age of Consent (1969)
Producer
Hero's Island (1962)
Co-producer
Bigger Than Life (1956)
Producer
Lady Possessed (1952)
Producer
I Met a Murderer (1939)
Producer

Production Companies (Feature Film)

Age of Consent (1969)
Company

Cast (Special)

Doctor Fischer of Geneva (1985)
The American Film Institute Salute to John Huston (1983)
Performer
Hollywood: The Pioneers (1980)
Guest Star
The Plot to Murder Hitler (1971)
Narrator
The Legend of Silent Night (1968)
Franz Gruber
Tonight in Samarkand (1961)
Sourab

Cast (Short)

Vienna The Years Remembered (1968)
Himself

Cast (TV Mini-Series)

A.D. (1985)
George Washington (1984)
Salem's Lot (1979)
Jesus of Nazareth (Do Not Use) (1977)
Origins of the Mafia (1974)
Frankenstein: The True Story (1973)
Dr Polidori

Life Events

1931

Stage debut in touring production of "Rasputin the Rascal Monk" at Aldershot Hippodrome

1933

Performed with Old Vic for season

1933

West End debut in "Gallows Glorious"

1935

Under contract to agent-director Albert Parker; film debut in Parker's "Late Extra"

1936

Under contract to Fox-British

1938

Formed Gamma Productions with Roy and Pamela Kellino

1939

First film as co-screenwriter and producer (also actor and first Gamma production), "I Met a Murderer" (dir. Roy Kellino)

1946

Moved to USA; unsuccessful attempt to form production company with David Rose

1947

Broadway debut in "Bathsheba"

1948

First American film, "Caught", directed by Max Ophuls

1951

First Portland film, "Lady Possessed" (also co-writer; producer), based on novel by Pamela Kellino and co-directed by William Spier and Roy Kellino)

1951

Formed Portland Pictures production company

1953

US TV debut on series, "Omnibus"

1962

Moved to Vevey, Switzerland

1984

Made last film, "The Assisi Underground" (released in 1985)

1993

Career celebrated in a retrospective held at Lincoln Center's Walter Reade Theater in New York City

Photo Collections

The Marriage-Go-Round - Movie Posters
The Marriage-Go-Round - Movie Posters
Lord Jim - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for Columbia Pictures' Lord Jim (1965), starring Peter O'Toole and James Mason. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Pandora and the Flying Dutchman - Movie Posters
Here are a few original release American movie posters for MGM's Pandora and the Flying Dutchman (1951), starring Ava Gardner and James Mason.
Julius Caesar (1953) - Publicity Stills
Here are a number of photos taken to help publicize MGM's Julius Caesar (1953), starring Marlon Brando, Deborah Kerr, James Mason, and Greer Garson. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Lolita - Peter Sellers Scene Stills
Here are several scene stills from Stanley Kubrick's Lolita (1962), all of them featuring Peter Sellers as Clare Quilty.
Lolita - Pressbook
Here is the campaign book (pressbook) for MGM's Lolita (1962), directed by Stanley Kubrick. Pressbooks were sent to exhibitors and theater owners to aid them in publicizing the film's run in their theater.
North by Northwest - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are several behind-the-scenes photos taken during the shooting of North by Northwest (1959). Look for director Alfred Hitchcock and stars Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint, and James Mason.
A Star is Born (1954) - Lobby Card
Here is a Lobby Card from A Star is Born (1954), starring Judy Garland and James Mason. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Lolita - Scene Stills
Here are several scene stills from Stanley Kubrick's Lolita (1962), starring James Mason and Sue Lyon.
Caught - Lobby Card Set
Here is a set of Lobby Cards from Caught (1949), starring James Mason and Barbara Bel Geddes. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Madame Bovary - Lobby Card Set
Here is a set of Lobby Cards from MGM's Madame Bovary (1949), starring Jennifer Jones, Van Heflin, and James Mason. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Odd Man Out - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for the British film Odd Man Out (1947), directed by Carol Reed. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
The Man Between - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for Carol Reed's The Man Between (1953), starring James Mason and Claire Bloom. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
The Boys from Brazil - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for The Boys from Brazil (1978), starring Laurence Olivier, Gregory Peck, and James Mason. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
The Decks Ran Red - Pressbook
Here is the campaign book (pressbook) for The Decks Ran Red (1958). Pressbooks were sent to exhibitors and theater owners to aid them in publicizing the film's run in their theater.
East Side, West Side - Movie Poster
Here is an original half-sheet movie poster for MGM's East Side, West Side (1949), starring Barbara Stanwyck, James Mason, Ava Gardner, and Van Heflin.
The Decks Ran Red - Lobby Card
Here is a Lobby Card from The Decks Ran Red (1958). Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.

Videos

Movie Clip

Julius Caesar (1953) - Open, Senseless Things Stately opening and comments from tribunes Flavius (Michael Pate) and Marullus (George MacReady), from Joseph L. Mankiewiecz's 1953 MGM production of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, starring Marlon Brando, John GIelgud, Louis Calhern and James Mason.
Julius Caesar (1953) - Friends, Romans, Countrymen! Just the first portion of the famous speech, Marlon Brando as "Mark Antony," come not to praise but to bury, in Joseph L. Mankiewicz's production of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, 1953.
Julius Caesar (1953) - Beware The Ides Of March Caesar (Louis Calhern) returns to Rome, checks in with wife Calpurnia (Greer Garson) and under-dressed Antony (Marlon Brando), then a blind soothsayer (Richard Hale) with famous words of warning, also getting a reading off Brutus (James Mason) in Joseph L. Mankiewicz's production of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, 1953.
Julius Caesar (1953) - Not In Our Stars... On a balcony with a statue of Caesar, Cassius (John Gielgud) tempts Brutus (James Mason) with murderous ideas, in Joseph L. Mankiewicz's 1953 production of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar.
Desert Fox, The (1951) - Already A Legend Michael Rennie is narrating but it's the author of the original book Desmond Young playing himself, in this scene introducing Erwin Rommel (James Mason), the title character, in Henry Hathaway's The Desert Fox, 1951.
Cry Terror! (1958) - That Makes Him The Patsy James Mason as electronics expert Jim has hurried to his suburban home to explain to his wife (Inger Stevens) that he’s realized he was tricked into making a bomb used in a sensational hijack threat, and as the perpetrator Hoplin (Rod Steiger) appears, his play is not yet clear, in Cry Terror!, 1958 from independent and thriller specialist Andrew L. Stone.
MacKintosh Man, The (1973) - Open, You See Before You A Villain A stately if simple opening from director John Huston, crossing the Thames to Parliament and finding James Mason as a Tory MP, Harry Andrews in the gallery, then star Paul Newman crossing Trafalgar Square, in The MacKintosh Man, 1973, also starring Dominique Sanda, from a novel by Desmond Bagley.
MacKintosh Man, The (1973) - Diamonds In The Mail Paul Newman has just entered an office off Trafalgar Square where exposition begins, as we learn he’s Rearden, who might be some sort of agent, greeted by Dominique Sanda as in-the-know office help Mrs. Smith and Harry Andrews as the title character, with oblique chat about crime, early in John Huston’s The MacKintosh Man, 1973.
Star is Born, A (1954) - Your Face Is Just Dandy At first failing to recognize her in studio make-up, Norman (James Mason) takes over the preparations for Esther (Judy Garland) before her screen test, an intimate scene from George Cukor's A Star Is Born, 1954.
Mandingo (1975) - On This Plantation Out of the credits with the end of Muddy Waters’ recording of the original theme song by Maurice Jarre and Hi Tide Harris, James Mason as plantation owner Maxwell, Paul Benedict as slave trader Brownlee, Ji-Tu Cumbuka as Cicero and Perry King as son Hammond, with foul language typical of the controversial box-office hit Mandingo, 1975.
Pandora And The Flying Dutchman (1952) - A Lack Of Love Following their first embrace, Pandora (Ava Gardner) and van der Zee (James Mason) on the Spanish coast of an evening, in writer-director Albert Lewin's Pandora And The Flying Dutchman, 1952.
Pandora And The Flying Dutchman (1952) - Darling Of The Gods Skinny-dipping American Pandora (Ava Gardner) on the Spanish Mediterranean coast finds a yacht and its captain (James Mason, his first scene), strange events in writer-director Albert Lewin's Pandora And The Flying Dutchman, 1952.

Trailer

Prince Valiant - (Original Trailer) A young Viking prince strives to become a knight in King Arthur''s Court and restore his exiled father to his rightful throne in Prince Valiant (1954).
Last of Sheila, The - (Original Trailer) The Last of Sheila (1973), an all-star whodunit written by Stephen Sondheim and Anthony Perkins.
Genghis Khan - (Original Trailer) The Asian conqueror (Omar Sharif) and his mentor (Stephen Boyd) vie for the same woman in Genghis Khan (1965).
Julius Caesar - (Re-issue Trailer) Marlon Brando heads an all-star cast in Joseph L. Mankiewicz's film of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar (1953).
East Side, West Side - (Original Trailer) Chic New York couple Barbara Stanwyck and James Mason are torn apart by a seductive model in East Side, West Side (1950).
Prisoner of Zenda, The (1952) - (Original Trailer) An Englishman who resembles the king of a small European nation gets mixed up in palace intrigue when his look-alike is kidnapped in The Prisoner of Zenda (1952), starring Stewart Granger, Deborah Kerr and James Mason.
Decks Ran Red, The - (Original Trailer) Dishonest seamen plan a murderous mutiny. Starring James Mason and Dorothy Dandridge.
Forever Darling - (Original Trailer) Desi Arnaz may say "I don't love Lucy!" unless her guardian angel (James Mason) can fix their marriage in Forever Darling (1956).
Deadly Affair, The - (Original Trailer) A secret agent investigates the tangled affairs surrounding a government official's suicide in The Deadly Affair (1966) starring James Mason.
Boys From Brazil, The - (Original Trailer) A Nazi hunter (Laurence Olivier) tracks a mad scientist (Gregory Peck) out to bring back Hitler.
Heaven Can Wait (1978) - (Original Trailer) When a football player dies early, he gets a second chance in the body of a crooked industrialist in Heaven Can Wait (1978) starring Warren Beatty and Julie Christie.
Madame Bovary (1949) - (Original Trailer) A romantic country girl sacrifices her marriage when she thinks she's found true love in Madame Bovary (1949) starring Jennifer Jones.

Family

John Mason
Father
Mabel Mason
Mother
Portland Mason
Daughter
Author, actor. Born 1948.
Morgan Mason
Son
Producer, executive, agent. Born 1949; was an executive producer of "sex, lies and videotape" (1989); married to pop singer Belinda Carlisle (formerly of the all-female band The Go-Gos).

Companions

Pamela Kellino
Wife
Actor, columnist, writer, TV host. Born 1916; married 1941, divorced 1964; daughter of producer Maurice Ostrer; formerly married to director Roy Kellino, with whom Pamela and Mason had formed Gamma Productions in 1938; died on June 29, 1996 at the age of 80.
Clarissa Kaye
Wife
Actor. Married August 8, 1971.

Bibliography

"Before I Forget"
James Mason (1981)
"The Films of James Mason"
Clive Hirschhorn, L.S.P. Books (1975)
"The Cats in Our Lives"
James Mason and Pamela Mason (1949)
"James Mason: An Authorised Biography"
Jno P Monaghan, World Film Publications (1947)

Notes

Mason is not to be confused with American actor James Mason (1890-1959), who was busy in American silent film but whose career declined with the advent of talking pictures.