David Miller


Director
David Miller

About

Also Known As
David H. Miller, Dave Miller
Birth Place
Paterson, New Jersey, USA
Born
November 28, 1909
Died
April 14, 1992

Biography

Throughout his impressive career, David Miller served as a director on a variety of great films. Miller's early work as a director consisted of a variety of independent films, such as the historical film "Billy the Kid" (1941) with Robert Taylor, "Flying Tigers" (1942) and the Groucho Marx comedy "Love Happy" (1949). He also appeared in "Our Very Own" (1950) with Ann Blyth, the Joan ...

Biography

Throughout his impressive career, David Miller served as a director on a variety of great films. Miller's early work as a director consisted of a variety of independent films, such as the historical film "Billy the Kid" (1941) with Robert Taylor, "Flying Tigers" (1942) and the Groucho Marx comedy "Love Happy" (1949). He also appeared in "Our Very Own" (1950) with Ann Blyth, the Joan Crawford thriller "Sudden Fear" (1952) and the Ginger Rogers crime picture "The Beautiful Stranger" (1954). He continued to work in film in the fifties and the sixties, directing motion pictures like the June Allyson adaptation "The Opposite Sex" (1956), "The Story of Esther Costello" (1957) and "Happy Anniversary" (1959) with David Niven. He also appeared in "Midnight Lace" (1960). Miller was nominated for a Promoting International Understanding Golden Globe Award for "Captain Newman, M.D." in 1963. Toward the end of his career, Miller directed "Executive Action" (1973) with Burt Lancaster and "Bittersweet Love" (1976). Miller was most recently credited in "Cake Wars" (Food Network, 2014-15). Miller passed away in April 1992 at the age of 83.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

Goldie and the Boxer Go to Hollywood (1981)
Director
Love For Rent (1979)
Director
Goldie and the Boxer (1979)
Director
Bittersweet Love (1976)
Director
Executive Action (1973)
Director
Hammerhead (1968)
Director
Captain Newman, M. D. (1963)
Director
Lonely Are the Brave (1962)
Director
Back Street (1961)
Director
Midnight Lace (1960)
Director
Happy Anniversary (1959)
Director
The Story of Esther Costello (1957)
Director
The Opposite Sex (1956)
Director
Diane (1956)
Director
Twist of Fate (1954)
Director
Sudden Fear (1952)
Director
Saturday's Hero (1951)
Director
Love Happy (1950)
Director
Our Very Own (1950)
Director
Top O' the Morning (1949)
Director
Flying Tigers (1942)
Director
Sunday Punch (1942)
Director
Billy the Kid (1941)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

Blood Bath (1966)
Rock Baby-Rock It (1957)
Chief Crazy Horse (1955)
Lieutenant
The Savage (1952)
Lt. Eric Stanley
Tomahawk (1951)
Captain Ten Eyck
Lady in the Dark (1944)
Horn nose clown

Writer (Feature Film)

Twist of Fate (1954)
Based upon an Original story by

Music (Feature Film)

Around the World in 80 Days (1956)
Musician

Visual Effects (Feature Film)

Gladiator (2000)
U.K. unit, Special Effects

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

Chief Crazy Horse (1955)
Technical Advisor
The Savage (1952)
Indian tech adv
Tomahawk (1951)
Indian tech adv
India Speaks (1933)
Tech Director

Director (Short)

FURTHER PROPHECIES OF NOSTRADAMUS (1942)
Director
More About Nostradamus (1940)
Director
Drunk Driving (1939)
Director
Ice Antics (1939)
Director
Nostradamus (1938)
Director
The Great Heart (1938)
Director
It's in the Stars (1938)
Director
Fisticuffs (1938)
Director
Equestrian Acrobats (1937)
Director
Dexterity (1937)
Director
Penny Wisdom (1937)
Director
Let's Dance (1936)
Director
Trained Hoofs (1935)
Director
Crew Racing (1935)
Director

Writer (Short)

It's in the Stars (1938)
Writer

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Midnight Lace (1960) - Sexually Off The Track Having been harassed in the fog and now on the phone, American Kit (Doris Day) and English financier husband Tony (Rex Harrison) visit Scotland Yard where inspector Byrnes (John Williams) comments on local miscreants, in MIdnight Lace, 1960.
Diane (1956) - You Have Sometimes Grieved In16th century France after a prologue establishing the historical and romantic stature of the title character, she (Lana Turner) is introduced with her husband the count (Torin Thatcher), David Miller directing for MGM, from a screenplay by Christopher Isherwood, based on historian John Erskine’s story, in Diane, 1956.
Diane (1956) - I See Manliness In His Face Now visiting King Francis I (Pedro Armendariz), presumably at Fontainbleau, petitioning for the release of her husband, the title character (Lana Turner) has been asked, due to her decorative qualities, to stick around, whereupon she meets the ruffian prince Henri (Roger Moore) and the more polite brother dauphin (Ronald Green), in Diane, 1956.
Diane (1956) - We'll Have A Fine Nest Of Italian Plotters Some MGM grandeur as the party has traveled to Marseilles, where the title character (Lana Turner) has trained the prince Henri (Roger Moore) in manners, their own passions bridled, before his wedding to Catherine de Medici (Marisa Pavan), royal staffers Tania Elg and John Lupton handling play-by-play, with several new charaters introduced, in Diane, 1956.
Midnight Lace (1960) - A Real London Fog London fog and Grosvenor Square as American heiress Doris Day gets terrified in the opening to the 1960 thriller Midnight Lace, from producer Ross Hunter, directed by David Miller, co-starring Rex Harrison, with Myrna Loy, John Gavin and Roddy McDowall.
Midnight Lace (1960) - No Telephones In Gondolas Dining out in London with his possibly financially-troubled colleague Charles (Herbert Marshall) and her aunt Bea (Myrna Loy), businessman Tony (Rex Harrison) confides a thing or two regarding his heiress wife Kit (Doris Day), who's got a phone stalker, in MIdnight Lace, 1960.
Sudden Fear (1952) - Make Me The Heavy Tight opening from director David Miller, Jack Palance is actor Lester Blaine, impressing everyone in rehearsal except Joan Crawford, as playwright and financier Myra, persuading her lieutenants (Taylor Holmes, Lewis Martin) to let him go, from Sudden Fear, also starring Gloria Grahame.
Sudden Fear (1952) - Junior Is More Impressionable Actor Lester (Jack Palance), now happily married after some turmoil to San Francisco socialite playwright Myra (Joan Crawford), isn’t expecting Irene (Gloria Grahame), who’s not been mentioned as yet, to appear on the arm of one of their lawyers (Touch a.k.a “Mike” Connors), in Sudden Fear, 1952.
Sudden Fear (1952) - I'm Entitled To A Cut Wealthy acclaimed playwright Myra (Joan Crawford) on the train from New York is surprised to meet actor Lester (Jack Palance), whom she fired a month before from her now-hit play, by genuine chance, then impressed with his attitude and charm, in Sudden Fear, 1952, from a novel by Edna Sherry.
Opposite Sex, The (1956) - Open Season On Husbands Big scene for Joan Collins as showgirl Crystal (drawn from the Joan Crawford role in the 1939 original The Women), with trouper Pat (Carolyn Jones, Dean Jones the stage-hand), Leslie Nielsen her target and Dolores Gray and Joan Blondell catching on, in the musical re-make, The Opposite Sex, 1956.
Opposite Sex, The (1956) - Four Million Square Males Ann Sheridan as playwright Amanda off to a crisp start, opening the Fay and Michael Kanin musical adaptation of Clare Boothe Luce's "The Women," also introducing Dolores Gray as Sylvia, Alice Pearce as manicurist Olga and Joan Blondell in the dark, in The Opposite Sex, 1956, starring June Allyson.
Back Street (1961) - You Call This Living? Opening scenes introducing Lincoln, Nebraska, traveling marine Paul Saxon (John Gavin), USO volunteer and budding designer Rae (Susan Hayward) and her admiring pal Curt (Charles Drake), in producer Ross Hunter's 1961 version of Fannie Hurst's Back Street.

Trailer

Bibliography