Josephine Lovett


Biography

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Hot Saturday (1932) - Where Are Your Pigtails? Nosy peers (Lillian Bond, Grady Sutton) watch as Ruth (Nancy Carroll) sneaks home from playboy Cary Grant's party, surprised to find family friend Bill (Randolph Scott, who met longtime pal Grant on this picture), advocated by her parents (Jane Darwell, William Collier) in Hot Saturday, 1932.
Single Standard, The (1929) - Men Have Done As They Pleased The fairly smashing introduction of brunette, flapper-ish Greta Garbo (in her 2nd-to-last silent film) as "Arden," Mahlon Hamilton a wandering husband seeking her confidence, Dorothy Sebastian as Mercedes at the party, and Johnny Mack Brown as admirer Tommy, opening The Single Standard, 1929.
Single Standard, The (1929) - I Don't Believe In Half Measures Greta Garbo as free-spirited Arden has fled a San Francisco party, insisting that her occasional boyfriend, her family chauffeur Kendall (Robert Castle) accompany her for a drive, her higher society friends not approving, early in The Single Standard, 1929.
Single Standard, The (1929) - Want To See A Fight? Fleeing rain and wolves on the San Francisco streets, heroine Arden (Greta Garbo) comes upon a modern art exhibit and it's improbable prize-fighter turned-painter honoree "Packy," (Garbo's fellow Swede Nils Asther), in The Single Standard, 1929, from an Adela Rogers St. Johns novel.
Hot Saturday (1932) - You're Considered Much Too Dangerous Still in the opening setting, Ruth (Nancy Carroll) is the belle of the local bank, "Connie" (Edward Woods) a leading suitor but all are dazzled by playboy Romer (Cary Grant), who's already losing interest in his date (Rita La Roy), in Paramount's Hot Saturday, 1932.
Hot Saturday (1932) - A Girl Is Pretty Helpless Cary Grant, in one of seven films from his first year in Hollywood, comfortable as popular playboy "Romer," who's invited the local kids up to his lake house, polite in his pursuit of Ruth (Nancy Carroll), her date (Edward Woods) still annoyed, in Hot Saturday, 1932.
Our Modern Maidens (1929) - Wouldn't It Be A Riot Gil (Douglas Fairbanks Jr.) wowing party guests with impressions (of his real-life father), friend Kentucky (Anita Page) charmed, when his girlfriend Billie (Joan Crawford) unleashes her famous dance number, aimed at influential Abbott (Rod LaRocque), in MGM's Our Modern Maidens, 1929.
Our Modern Maidens (1929) - I'm Mad About You Billie (Joan Crawford, in her last silent film) has wheedled her way to the home of diplomat Abbott (Rod LaRocque), aiming to tease him into helping her boyfriend's career, with too much success, in MGM's Our Modern Maidens, 1929.
Our Modern Maidens (1929) - Lunch Is Poured New college grads hurrying home after a party on the morning train, Billie (Joan Crawford) leads the gang along with pal Kentucky (Anita Page) and newly secretly engaged beau Gil (Douglas Fairbanks Jr.), early in MGM's Our Modern Maidens, 1929.
Our Dancing Daughters - Open, Vicious Opening credits and the introduction of Joan Crawford (as fun-loving-but-decent Diana, in her breakthrough film), preparing with her mother (Dorothy Cumming) for a night out, in MGM's Our Dancing Daughters, 1928.
Our Dancing Daughters - Diana The Dangerous Fiery flapper Diana (Joan Crawford) is entirely the life of the party, attracting the gaze of very eligible Ben Blaine (John Mack Brown) in MGM's Our Dancing Daughters, 1928.
Our Dancing Daughters - Beauty And Purity Character insights on Ann (Anita Page) and her mother (Kathlyn Williams), which will figure prominently in the coming romantic drama, in MGM's daring Our Dancing Daughters, 1928.

Bibliography