Joan Lorring


Joan Lorring

About

Also Known As
Mary Magdalene Ellis, Dellie Ellis, Madeline Ellis
Birth Place
Hong Kong
Born
April 17, 1926
Died
May 30, 2014

Biography

Actress Joan Lorring was born in Hong Kong in April 1926, as Madeline Ellis, known to friends and family as Dellie. (Some sources give her birth name as Mary Magdalene Ellis.) Lorring was of Russian-Anglo descent, and following the Japanese invasion of Hong Kong in 1939, she and her mother fled to the United States. Lorring and her mother chose to make San Francisco their home, and shor...

Biography

Actress Joan Lorring was born in Hong Kong in April 1926, as Madeline Ellis, known to friends and family as Dellie. (Some sources give her birth name as Mary Magdalene Ellis.) Lorring was of Russian-Anglo descent, and following the Japanese invasion of Hong Kong in 1939, she and her mother fled to the United States. Lorring and her mother chose to make San Francisco their home, and shortly afterward, young Dellie Ellis began working in radio. After establishing herself in the non-visual medium, the actress made her first screen appearances at the tender age of 18 in the film "Song of Russia" (1944), for which the studio changed her name to Joan Lorring. Lorring appeared in the second film version of Thornton Wilder's best-selling novel "The Bridge of San Luis Rey" (1944). The following year, Lorring appeared opposite screen legend Bette Davis in the melodrama "The Corn Is Green." Her role as conniving Bessie Watty was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Following her nomination, Lorring was cast in a few Hollywood noir thrillers including "The Verdict" (1946) and "Three Strangers" (1946). During the 1950s and '60s, Lorring began working primarily on stage -- including an acclaimed lead role in the 1950 production "Come Back Little Sheba" -- and in televised plays. Her final big screen role came in the gritty Burt Lancaster-directed crime drama "The Midnight Man" (1974), followed by a year-long stint on the popular soap opera "Ryan's Hope" (ABC 1975-1989). Joan Lorring died on May 30, 2014 in the New York City suburb of Sleepy Hollow.

Life Events

1944

Appeared in "The Bridge of San Luis Rey"

1945

Nominated for an Academy Award for "The Corn Is Green"

1974

Appeared in "The Midnight Man" opposite Burt Lancaster

Videos

Movie Clip

Three Strangers (1946) - At Least Ten Years Of Fainting The last bit of Crystal (Geraldine Fitzgerald) having it out with her husband (Alan Napier, whom she claimed was overseas) then she’s transported via Kwan Yin’s statue to join her new co-conspirator West (Peter Lorre), whose mysterious friend Icy (Joan Lorring) arrives, John Huston and Howard Koch’s script twisting, in Three Strangers, 1946.
Three Strangers (1946) - She's A Very Ancient Personage Geraldine Fitzgerald still hasn’t exchanged names with equally unacquainted Peter Lorre and Sydney Greenstreet, having lured them up to her plush first floor London apartment, beginning to explain what she has in mind, from an original script by John Huston and Howard Koch, in Three Strangers, 1946.
Gangster, The (1947) - My Conscience Never Bothered Me Heady opening in a relatively high-priced entry from Monogram/Allied Artists, Barry Sullivan (as “Shubunka”) narrates about his operation in a fictional New York neighborhood, soda jerk Henry Morgan, cashier Joan Lorring, and underling Akim Tamiroff on the phone, in The Gangster, 1947.
Gangster, The (1947) - I'm In A Hole Shorty (Henry Morgan) and cashier Dorothy (Joan Lording), both with plenty attitude, both work for title-character Shubunka (Barry Sullilvan) in his boardwalk soda-shop front operation, gambler Karty (John Ireland) pleading for for a bailout, in The Gangster, 1947.
Verdict, The (1946) - The Size Of My Britches George Coulouris is Buckley, the policeman who brought about the firing of his predecessor Grodman (Sydney Greenstreet), here chuckling with friend Victor (Peter Lorre), then sly Lottie (Joan Loring) at the crime scene, in The Verdict, 1946, directed by Don Siegel.

Bibliography