Julie London


Actor
Julie London

About

Also Known As
Julie Peck
Birth Place
Santa Clara, California, USA
Born
September 26, 1926
Died
October 18, 2000
Cause of Death
Complications From A Stroke

Biography

The daughter of a vaudeville song-and-dance team, Julie London had show business in her blood. But rather than adopting the eager-to-please energy of vaudeville, London became known for a chilly inaccessibility that made her stunning blonde-bombshell looks even more enticing. The most enduring image of her long career occurs early in the classic rock and roll comedy "The Girl Can't Help ...

Family & Companions

Jack Webb
Husband
Actor, director. Married 1945, divorced 1953.
Bobby Troup
Husband
Actor. Appeared opposite London in TV series "Emergency".

Biography

The daughter of a vaudeville song-and-dance team, Julie London had show business in her blood. But rather than adopting the eager-to-please energy of vaudeville, London became known for a chilly inaccessibility that made her stunning blonde-bombshell looks even more enticing. The most enduring image of her long career occurs early in the classic rock and roll comedy "The Girl Can't Help It," when star Tom Ewell hallucinates London (playing his ex-girlfriend) coolly stalking him around his living room singing her signature hit single "Cry Me A River" with disdainful hauteur. London began her film career in the early 1940s, co-starring in pleasant but forgettable B-movies like "The Red House" and "Tap Roots." During this period, she was married to a struggling young actor named Jack Webb; following their 1954 divorce, London married jazz musician Bobby Troup, best known for writing the standard "Route 66." In 1955, London began her singing career with her aforementioned smash hit, following it with several years' worth of similarly cool jazz-pop hits delivered in her trademark husky whisper of a voice and packaged in some eye-popping LP sleeves. London wound down her film career in the early 1960s as her music career took precedence, but in 1972, Webb hired both London and Troup to play starring roles in the hit TV series "Emergency! ," which he produced. London retired from acting when "Emergency! " went off the air in 1978, having ceased her singing career several years previously. Julie London died October 18, 2000.

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

Emergency! (1972)
Nurse Dixie Mccall
The Helicopter Spies (1968)
The George Raft Story (1961)
Sheila Patton
The 3rd Voice (1960)
Corey Scott, also known as Frances
The Wonderful Country (1959)
Ellen Colton
Night of the Quarter Moon (1959)
Ginny O'Sullivan Nelson
Voice in the Mirror (1958)
Ellen Burton
Saddle the Wind (1958)
Joan Blake
Man of the West (1958)
Billie Ellis
The Great Man (1957)
Carol Larson
Drango (1957)
Shelby Ransom
The Girl Can't Help It (1956)
Crime Against Joe (1956)
Frances "Slacks" Bennett
The Fighting Chance (1955)
Janet Wales
The Fat Man (1951)
Pat Boyd
Return of the Frontiersman (1950)
Janie Martin
Task Force (1949)
Barbara McKinney
Tap Roots (1948)
Aven Dabney
The Red House (1947)
Tibby [Rinton]
A Night in Paradise (1946)
Palace maiden
On Stage Everybody (1945)
Vivian Carlton
Billy Rose's Diamond Horseshoe (1945)
Girl
Nabonga Gorilla (1944)
Doreen Stockwell

Music (Feature Film)

Poms (2019)
Song Performer
Greta (2019)
Song Performer
The Widow (2018)
Song Performer
Welcome to Marwen (2018)
Song Performer
Crazy Love (2007)
Song Performer
The Notorious Bettie Page (2006)
Song Performer
V for Vendetta (2006)
Song Performer
Bridget Jones's Diary (2001)
Song Performer
Viva las Nowhere (2001)
Song Performer
The Big Tease (2000)
Song Performer
Panic (2000)
Song Performer
Teaching Mrs. Tingle (1999)
Song Performer
Teaching Mrs. Tingle (1999)
Song
Don't Go Breaking My Heart (1998)
Song Performer
Broken Noses (1987)
Song Performer
Sharky's Machine (1981)
Song Performer
Voice in the Mirror (1958)
Composer

Cast (Special)

The Gershwin Years (1962)
Frances Langford Presents (1959)
Maggie Malone (1959)
Maggie Malone

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Wonderful Country, The (1959) - They Don't Stay Very Pretty Forthright Texas Ranger captain Rucker (Albert Dekker) speaks to hired gun Brady (Robert Mitchum) about Ellen (Julie London), the center of attention at a party hosted by her husband Major Colton (Gary Merrill), with whom he soon initiates a difficult conversation, in The Wonderful Country, 1959.
Girl Can't Help It, The (1956) - A Story Of Music Tom Ewell in director Frank Tashlin's introduction of the technique he used to open both his Jayne Mansfield comedies, then credits with Little Richard's performance of the title tune by Bobby Troup, from The Girl Can't Help It, 1956.
Wonderful Country, The (1959) - Ever Heard The Word Gringo? American-born gunmam Brady (Robert Mitchum), stuck in Texas with a broken leg, is interviewed by Major Colton (Gary Merrill), who hopes he might rat out his Mexican crime-lord boss, the major's wife (Julie London) taking note, in Robert Parrish's The Wonderful Country, 1959.
Man of the West - Opening Credits Hard to say whether the mountains or Gary Cooper seem more immovable in the opening credit sequence from Anthony Mann's Man of the West, 1958, co-starring Lee J. Cobb, Julie London and Arthur O'Connell.
Man of the West - Do You Talk? The Tobin gang bungles the robbery of a train, and ex-outlaw Link (Gary Cooper), con-man Beasley (Arthur O'Connell) and singer Billie (Julie London) are left behind, in Anthony Mann's Man of the West, 1958.
Man of the West - Do It Your Way! Just a portion of the epic and nuanced fistfight between recently-introduced cousins Coaley (Jack Lord) and Link (Gary Cooper), overseen by vicious Uncle Dock (Lee J. Cobb) in Anthony Mann's Man of the West, 1958.
Man of the West - Ticket to Fort Worth Thespian work by Gary Cooper (as "Link") seeing his first train, dealing with schmoozer Beasley (Arthur O'Connell) and fending off the sheriff (Frank Ferguson) in Anthony Mann's Man of the West, 1958.

Companions

Jack Webb
Husband
Actor, director. Married 1945, divorced 1953.
Bobby Troup
Husband
Actor. Appeared opposite London in TV series "Emergency".

Bibliography