Charles Lawton


Director Of Photography

Biography

Filmography

 

Cinematography (Feature Film)

Oh Dad, Poor Dad, Mama's Hung You in the Closet and I'm Feelin' So Sad (1967)
Co-photog
A Rage To Live (1965)
Director of Photography
Ensign Pulver (1964)
Director of Photography
Youngblood Hawke (1964)
Director of Photography
Spencer's Mountain (1963)
Director of Photography
Rome Adventure (1962)
Director of Photography
My Sister Eileen (1955)
Director of Photography
The Walking Hills (1949)
Director of Photography
Blondie Knows Best (1946)
Photography
See Here, Private Hargrove (1944)
Director of Photography
Young Ideas (1943)
Director of Photography
The Youngest Profession (1943)
Director of Photography
Dr. Gillespie's Criminal Case (1943)
Director of Photography
The Vanishing Virginian (1942)
Director of Photography
This Time for Keeps (1942)
Director of Photography
Fingers at the Window (1942)
Director of Photography
A Yank at Eton (1942)
Director of Photography
Eyes in the Night (1942)
Director of Photography
Joe Smith, American (1942)
Director of Photography
The Affairs of Martha (1942)
Director of Photography
Maisie Was a Lady (1941)
Director of Photography
Ringside Maisie (1941)
Director of Photography
The Penalty (1941)
Loc Camera
Free and Easy (1941)
Director of Photography
The Big Store (1941)
Director of Photography
Sky Murder (1940)
Director of Photography
Congo Maisie (1940)
Director of Photography
Dulcy (1940)
Photography
Forty Little Mothers (1940)
Photography
Andy Hardy Meets Debutante (1940)
Photography
Gold Rush Maisie (1940)
Director of Photography
Hullabaloo (1940)
Director of Photography
Miracles for Sale (1939)
Director of Photography
Within the Law (1939)
Photography
Nick Carter, Master Detective (1939)
Photography
Another Language (1933)
Camera Operator

Cinematography (Short)

FURTHER PROPHECIES OF NOSTRADAMUS (1942)
Cinematographer
Famous Boners (1942)
Cinematographer
More About Nostradamus (1940)
Cinematographer
The Giant of Norway (1939)
Cinematographer
Bravest of the Brave (1938)
Cinematographer
The King Without a Crown (1937)
Cinematographer

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Fingers At The Window (1942) — Can You Stand A Shock? With Chicago terrorized by axe murderers we viewers know are not random maniacs, surprisingly intrepid unemployed actor Oliver (Lew Ayres) has snuck into smitten potential girlfriend Edwina's (Laraine Day) apartment, aiming to lure the one who’s been after her (Charles Wagenheim), in Fingers At The Window, 1942.
Fingers At The Window (1942) — There Are No Evil Spirits Ever more clever unemployed actor Oliver (Lew Ayres) poses as one of the the paranoid schizophrenics being rounded up in Chicago, so he can see files linking the already captured axe-murderers to the psychiatric clinic, Miles Mander his enthused doctor, then wangles a ride back to his girlfriend, in Fingers At The Window, 1942.
Gunman's Walk (1958) - Yes, Big Brother Handsome opening by director Phil Karlson, photographed by Charles “Buddy” Lawton, introducing James Darren as voluble Davy, and avid horseman Tab Hunter as elder brother Ed, taciturn by comparison, and whistling, in the Columbia Technicolor Western, from a story by Ric Hardman and screenplay by Frank Nugent, Gunman’s Walk, 1958, starring Van Heflin.
Shockproof (1949) - Change Your Brand Of Men Nifty opening by director Douglas Sirk and co-screenwriters Helen Deutsch and Samuel Fuller, introducing female lead Patricia Knight, who joins her then-husband Cornel Wilde, who reveals the nature of their character's business, in Shockproof, 1949.
Gold Rush Maisie (1940) - Plenty Of Tears Ann Sothern (title character) is leaving town, from the diner where Harry (Irving Bacon) is sharing the big news, one customer (Henry Roquemore) leaving as another (Eddie Gribbon) arrives, and young Jubie (Virginia Weidler) appears seeking aid, in Gold Rush Maisie, 1940, the third in the MGM series.
Gold Rush Maisie (1940) - I Wanna Be Just Like You! Now all-in with the family of hard-luck dirt farmer turned gold prospector Bert (John F. Hamilton), Ann Sothern (title character) meets friend Elmo (Louis Mason), who boasts of success, then chats with admiring daughter Jubie (Virginia Weidler), in Gold Rush Maisie, 1940.
Gold Rush Maisie (1940) - What Kind Of A Town Is This? Third movie in the MGM series, this time the title character (Ann Sothern) has had a breakdown near an Arizona desert town, where, with some difficulty, she meets Lee Bowman as grumpy rancher Bill, who’s not much inclined to help, in Gold Rush Maisie, 1940, co-starring Virginia Weidler.
Jubal (1956) - Most Horses Is Better Than Humans First scene after the opening, in which rancher Shep (Ernest Borgnine) found Glenn Ford (title character) staggering out of the Wyoming woods, introducing Pinky (Rod Steiger), Sam (Noah Beery Jr.) and Carson (John Dierkes), in Jubal, 1956, directed by Delmer Daves, often cited as a Western treatment of Shakespeare’s Othello.
Jubal (1956) - They'll Steal You Blind Director Delmer Daves introduces key characters, as new ranch foreman Glenn Ford (title character) has to intervene when Pinky (Rod Steiger) and friends tangle with a caravan of Christian pilgrims (Basil Ruysdael as Shem Hoktor, Felicia Farr his daughter, Charles Bronson riding shotgun), in Jubal, 1956.
Jubal (1956) - We're Ending This Before It Starts Joining dinner with big-hearted rancher Shep (Ernest Borgnine) who’s taken a liking to his new hand (Glenn Ford, title character) and offers him a job, with no idea about the misdeeds of his youthful Canadian wife Mae (English ingenue Valerie French, in her first Hollywood role), in director Delmer Daves’ dark Western, Jubal, 1956.
Jubal (1956) - You Might Get Burned Glenn Ford (title character) is winning over folks at the Wyoming cattle ranch, where he was brought by the owner who found him wandering in the mountains, especially the rancher’s young wife Mae (Valerie French), whose intentions are barely disguised, in director Delmer Daves’ Jubal, 1956.
Jubal (1956) - Promised Land, I Guess If you wondered whey they were called “psychological Westerns,” ranch foreman Glenn Ford (title character) surprises himself, opening up to Naomi (Felicia Farr), whose father leads a band of pilgrims passing through, in Jubal, 1956, Delmer Daves directing from the screenplay he co-wrote with Russell S. Hughes, from a novel by Paul I. Wellman.

Bibliography