Charles Laughton


Actor
Charles Laughton

About

Birth Place
North Yorkshire, England, GB
Born
July 01, 1899
Died
December 15, 1962
Cause of Death
Cancer

Biography

A portly, but versatile actor, Charles Laughton became an international star in his native England before coming to America where he became one of Hollywood's most popular and respected performers. Laughton made his New York stage debut in "Payment Deferred" (1931) and soon after won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his scene-chewing performance in "The Private Life of Henry VIII" (1...

Photos & Videos

The Bribe - Lobby Card Set
The Big Clock - Movie Poster
Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd - Movie Poster

Family & Companions

Elsa Lanchester
Wife
Actor. Co-starred together, married in 1929.
Christopher Isherwood
Companion
Author. Had relationship in the 1940s.

Bibliography

"Charles Laughton : A Difficult Actor"
Simon Callow, Grove Press (1988)
"Charles Laughton : An Intimate Biography"
Charles Higham
"First Day in an Actor's Life : A Comedy Based on the Life of Charles Laughton"
Bruce Zortman
"Elsa Lanchester, Herself"
Elsa Lanchester

Biography

A portly, but versatile actor, Charles Laughton became an international star in his native England before coming to America where he became one of Hollywood's most popular and respected performers. Laughton made his New York stage debut in "Payment Deferred" (1931) and soon after won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his scene-chewing performance in "The Private Life of Henry VIII" (1933). Two years later, he delivered one of his most iconic roles, playing the cruel Captain Bligh in the excellent "Mutiny on the Bounty" (1935), and was brilliant as the deformed Quasimodo in "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" (1939). After running afoul of Alfred Hitchcock in "Jamaica Inn" (1939), Laughton dazzled in a variety of roles in films like "The Canterville Ghost" (1944), "Captain Kidd" (1945), "The Big Clock" (1948) and "The Man on the Eiffel Tower" (1949). He reprised Captain Kidd for "Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd" (1952) and King Henry VIII for "Young Bess" (1953), before making his one and only film as a director, "The Night of the Hunter" (1955), which was dismissed by critics at the time but was later deemed a masterpiece. Laughton continued to deliver great performances in films like "Witness for the Prosecution" (1957), "Spartacus" (1960) and "Advise and Consent" (1962), but a long battle with kidney cancer slowed him down and ultimately took his life. For three decades, Laughton was a gifted performer who maintained a high level of popularity matched by few character actors of any era.

Born on July 1, 1899 in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, England, Laughton was raised by his father, Robert, a hotel keeper, and his mother, Eliza. He attended the Roman Catholic Stonyhurst College until 1915, when his parents sent him off to work at Claridges Hotel while World War I raged across Europe. Despite his parents wanting him to join the family business, Laughton showed no interest outside of earning money, which he spent quite a bit of at London theatres. He joined the army in 1917 when he was old enough, serving in the Huntingdonshire Cyclists before being sent to the Western Front in 1918. It was there that Laughton came face to face with the horrors of war, things that he refused to talk about even decades later. Right before the armistice, Laughton was involved in a gas attack that burned the skin on his back and caused years of throat problems that jeopardized his early acting career. Meanwhile, he convalesced from his injuries, leaving the army in 1919 and returning home to resume his work at the family's hotel.

In order to fully heal, however, Laughton - whose desire to perform was rekindled while in the hospital - began acting in amateur theatre groups. When he was 27 years old, he was finally allowed by his family to attend the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, where he made his first professional stage appearance at the Barnes Theatre in the comedy "The Government Inspector" (1926). From there, he landed roles in productions of Chekhov's "The Cherry Orchard" and "The Tree Sisters" before snagging the lead for the London premiere of Sean O'Casey's "The Silver Tassie" (1928). Though physically not a classic leading man, the portly Laughton won audiences over with his immense talent in productions of "Mr. Prohack," "Alibi," "Mr. Pickwick" and "Payment Deferred." About this time, he began appearing in films, making his debut with a small role opposite Gilda Gray and Anna May Wong in the showbiz drama "Piccadilly" (1929). Laughton went on to appear in two early British talkies, starring opposite Dorothy Gish in "Wolves" (1930) and playing a half-Asian drug smuggler in the crime drama "Down River" (1931).

After making his New York stage debut in 1931, Laughton began his Hollywood career with James Whales' "The Old Dark Horse" (1932) and playing Emperor Nero in Cecil B. DeMille's religious epic "The Sign of the Cross" (1932). Also that year, he appeared in the Paramount Pictures anthology film "If I Had a Million" (1932) and played Dr. Moreau in the controversial horror thriller "Island of Lost Souls" (1932), starring Bela Lugosi and Kathleen Burke. Returning to England, Laughton delivered his most venerable performance, playing a mutton-eating King Henry VIII in the classic biopic "The Private Life of Henry VIII" (1933). Not only did his exuberant performance earn him the Academy Award for Best Actor and turn him into an international star, but the film itself put the previously ignored British cinema on the map. In 1933, Laughton had given up the stage in favor of motion pictures and next starred opposite Carole Lombard in "White Woman" (1933). He went on to play the malevolent father of adult children living under his room in "The Barretts of Wimpole Street" (1934) and police inspector Javert in "Les Misérable" (1935).

At MGM, Laughton delivered one of his most famous performances in "Mutiny on the Bounty" (1935), portraying cruel taskmaster Captain William Bligh, who earns the enmity of his misfit crew aboard the U.S.S. Bounty by dispensing discipline through repeated lashings and rationing of food. His brilliant performance as the despicable Bligh opposite Clark Gable's Fletcher Christian earned Laughton an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor. After starring in the comedy "Ruggles of Red Rap" (1935), he had a valiant turn as Dutch artist Rembrandt van Rijn in "Rembrandt" (1936), an interesting but failed biopic about the famed 17th century painter. He next starred opposite fellow Brits Vivian Leigh and Rex Harrison in "St. Martin's Lane" (1938), before starring in Alfred Hitchcock's last British picture, "Jamaica Inn" (1939), where he managed to outsize Hitchcock in terms of ego by demanding that his minor role be expanded into a major one. From there, Laughton had yet another iconic performance, movingly playing the grotesquely deformed Quasimodo to Maureen O'Hara's Esmeralda in "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" (1939), arguably the best adaptation of Victor Hugo's novel. Laughton reunited with Lombard for the marriage drama "They Knew What They Wanted" (1940), before playing the head of a family living in the South Seas in "The Tuttles of Tahiti" (1942) and an American admiral in the World War II drama "Stand By for Action" (1942).

Continuing to dazzle in a wide range of characters, Laughton was a cowardly schoolmaster in "This Land is Mine" (1943), an amiable but henpecked shopkeeper in "The Suspect" (1944), a feckless British aristocrat who fails to act on the field of battle in "The Canterville Ghost" (1944) and the titular "Captain Kidd" (1945), a seafaring adventure about the famed 17th century pirate. After playing a famed Broadway producer in the romantic comedy "Because of Him" (1946), Laughton somehow managed to get back into Hitchcock's good graces to appear in the Master's lesser film "The Paradine Case" (1947), starring Gregory Peck and Ann Todd. He next joined Ray Milland and Maureen O'Sullivan for the excellent but underrated film noir "The Big Clock" (1948). Laughton went on to play an analytical inspector on the trail of a clever murderer in "The Man on the Eiffel Tower" (1949) and was a member of a South American contraband racket in the good, but not great crime thriller "The Bribe" (1949). Following turns in the weepy drama "The Blue Veil" (1951) and opposite Boris Karloff in "The Strange Door" (1951), Laughton reprised the infamous Cpt. Kidd for the comedy "Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd" (1952).

Still very much in demand after two decades on the screen, Laughton reprised his Oscar-winning role of King Henry VIII for "Young Bess" (1953), a history-bending drama about the early years of the woman (Jean Simmons) who would later become Queen Elizabeth I. In the religious epic "Salome" (1953), he portrayed a superstitious King Herod, before playing a domineering boot shop owner in David Lean's satirical comedy "Hobson's Choice" (1954). Meanwhile, Laughton - who had previously directed theater back in his stage days - decided to have a go at directing a feature, "The Night of the Hunter" (1955), which featured a mesmerizing performance by Robert Mitchum as a murderous convict posing as a preacher in order to win over his old cellmate's family in an effort to locate hidden money. Both a literal and proverbial parable on good and evil, "The Night of the Hunter" was a critical and box office flop at the time of release. Despite expert craftsmanship on the part of Laughton - including amazing an amazing underwater shot of a body - he never again directed another film. Still, the film grew substantially in stature over the years and was lauded by many contemporary critics as a masterpiece, with Mitchum delivering one of the best and most frightening performances of his career.

In Billy Wilder's excellent courtroom drama "Witness for the Prosecution" (1957), Laughton delivered an Oscar-nominated performance as a master barrister in ill health who battles his overbearing nurse (played by real-life wife Elsa Lanchester) in order to take on the case of a man (Tyrone Power) accused of murder. Returning to the stage in 1958, he directed and starred in "The Party," which co-starred Lanchester and Albert Finney. He made his final stage appearances as Bottom in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" (1959) and as "King Lear" (1959), both for the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre. Failing health prevented Laughton from working as prolifically has he had done in the past. In fact, he only appeared in two more films, playing an unscrupulous Roman senator who opts for suicide rather than capital punishment in Stanley Kubrick's historical epic "Spartacus" (1960) and a curmudgeonly Southern politician in Otto Preminger's political drama "Advise and Consent" (1962). Later that year, on Dec. 15, 1962, Laughton died after a long battle with kidney cancer. He was 63 years old and left behind wife and frequent acting partner, Elsa Lanchester - best known for portraying "The Bride of Frankenstein" (1935) - whom he had married in 1929. But after his death, rumors persisted that Laughton was actually homosexual, which was seemingly confirmed by Lanchester in her autobiography. In fact, she claimed the reason they never had children together was because of Laughton's sexuality, though old friend Maureen O'Hara refuted the claim and insisted the reason was Lanchester's pair of abortions - one assumed to be from Laughton - she had undergone earlier in life and which rendered her unable to give birth. Though generally accepted by historians, Laughton's sexuality remained an open question.

By Shawn Dwyer

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

The Night of the Hunter (1955)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

Charles Laughton: A Difficult Actor (1988)
Himself
Head (1968)
The Epic That Never Was (I, Claudius) (1965)
Tiberius Claudius ("I, Claudius")
Advise & Consent (1962)
Sen. Seabright Cooley
Under Ten Flags (1960)
Adm. Russell
Spartacus (1960)
Gracchus
Witness for the Prosecution (1957)
Sir Wilfrid [Robarts]
Hobson's Choice (1954)
Henry Hobson
Salome (1953)
King Herod
Young Bess (1953)
King Henry [VIII]
Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd (1952)
Captain Kidd
O. Henry's Full House (1952)
Soapy Throckmorton
The Blue Veil (1951)
Frederick K. Begley
The Strange Door (1951)
Sire Alan de Maletroit
The Man on the Eiffel Tower (1950)
Inspector Maigret
The Bribe (1949)
J. J. Bealer
The Paradine Case (1948)
Lord Thomas Horfield
The Girl from Manhattan (1948)
The bishop
Arch of Triumph (1948)
[von] Haake
The Big Clock (1948)
Earl Janoth
Because of Him (1946)
John Sheridan
The Suspect (1945)
Philip [Marshall]
Captain Kidd (1945)
Captain William Kidd
The Canterville Ghost (1944)
Sir Simon de Canterville/The Ghost
Stand by for Action (1943)
Rear Admiral Stephan ["Iron Pants"] Thomas
This Land Is Mine (1943)
Albert Lory
The Man from Down Under (1943)
Jocko Wilson
Forever and a Day (1943)
Bellamy
Tales of Manhattan (1942)
Charles Smith
The Tuttles of Tahiti (1942)
Jonas [Tuttle]
It Started with Eve (1941)
Johnathan Reynolds
They Knew What They Wanted (1940)
Tony Patucci
The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939)
Quasimodo
The Beachcomber (1939)
Ginger Ted, [Edward C. Wilson]
Jamaica Inn (1939)
Sir Humphrey Pengallan
St. Martin's Lane (1938)
Charles Staggers
Rembrandt (1936)
Rembrandt [van Rijn]
Ruggles of Red Gap (1935)
[Colonel Marmaduke "Bill"] Ruggles
Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)
[Captain William] Bligh
Les Misérables (1935)
[Emile] Javert
The Barretts of Wimpole Street (1934)
Edward Moulton-Barrett
The Private Life of Henry VIII (1934)
Henry VIII
White Woman (1933)
Horace [H.] Prin
The Sign of the Cross (1932)
Nero
The Old Dark House (1932)
Sir William Porterhouse
Devil and the Deep (1932)
Commander Charles Sturm
Payment Deferred (1932)
William [Willie] Marble
Island of Lost Souls (1932)
Dr. Moreau
If I Had a Million (1932)
Phineas V. Lambert
Down River (1931)
Wolves (1930)
Piccadilly (1929)
Bluebottles (1928)
Day-Dreams (1928)

Writer (Feature Film)

The Night of the Hunter (1955)
Screenwriter

Music (Feature Film)

Knight of Cups (2016)
Song Performer

Production Companies (Feature Film)

The Beachcomber (1939)
Company
Jamaica Inn (1939)
Company
St. Martin's Lane (1938)
Company

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Galileo (1974)
Interpreter

Cast (Special)

Al Pacino: Inside Out (2001)
This Is Charles Laughton (1952)
Host

Cast (Short)

Cavalcade of the Academy Awards (1940)
Himself

Life Events

1931

Made New York stage debut in "Payment Deferred"

1932

Became established as a Hollywood star with roles in the films "Payment Deferred", "The Old Dark House", "The Devil and the Deep" and "The Sign of the Cross"

1955

Directed one film, "The Night of the Hunter"

1962

Last film, "Advise and Consent", directed by Otto Preminger

Photo Collections

The Bribe - Lobby Card Set
Here is a set of Lobby Cards from MGM's The Bribe (1949), starring Robert Taylor, Ava Gardner, Charles Laughton, and Vincent Price. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
The Big Clock - Movie Poster
Here is an original 3-Sheet movie poster from Paramount's The Big Clock (1948), starring Ray Milland and Charles Laughton.
Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd - Movie Poster
Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd - Movie Poster
Hobson's Choice - Movie Poster
Hobson's Choice - Movie Poster
Witness for the Prosecution - Movie Posters
Witness for the Prosecution - Movie Posters
It Started with Eve - Movie Poster
It Started with Eve - Movie Poster
Stand by for Action - Kapralik Trade Ad
Here is a trade ad for MGM's Stand by for Action (1943), starring Robert Taylor, Charles Laughton, and Brian Donlevy. The art is by mixed-media caricaturist Jaques Kapralik. Trade Ads were placed by studios in industry magazines like Variety and The Hollywood Reporter.
The Barretts of Wimpole Street (1934) - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for The Barretts of Wimpole Street (1934). One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
The Private Life of Henry VIII - Movie Poster
Here is an original American-release movie poster for the Korda production The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933), starring Charles laughton.
The Night of the Hunter - Pressbook
Here is the campaign book (pressbook) for The Night of the Hunter (1955), directed by Charles Laughton. Pressbooks were sent to exhibitors and theater owners to aid them in publicizing the film's run in their theater.
The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939) - Scene Stills
Here are some scene stills from RKO's The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939), starring Charles Laughton and Maureen O'Hara.
Because of Him - Publicity Stills
Here are a number of publicity stills from Universal's Because of Him (1946), starring Deanna Durbin, Charles Laughton, and Franchot Tone. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Because of Him - Scene Stills
Here are several scene stills from Universal Pictures' Because of Him (1946), starring Deanna Durbin, Charles Laughton, and Franchot Tone.
Devil and the Deep - Scene Stills
Here are several scene stills from Paramount Pictures' Devil and the Deep (1932), starring Gary Cooper, Tallulah Bankhead, and Charles Laughton.
Because of Him - Movie Posters
Here are a few movie posters from Universal Pictures' Because of Him (1946), starring Deanna Durbin, Charles Laughton, and Franchot Tone.
Devil and the Deep - Lobby Cards
Here are a few Lobby Cards from Paramount's Devil and the Deep (1932), starring Charles Laughton, Gary Cooper, and Tallulah Bankhead. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Devil and the Deep - Publicity Stills
Here are a few publicity stills from Paramount's Devil and the Deep (1932), starring Gary Cooper, Tallulah Bankhead, and Charles Laughton. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Ruggles of Red Gap - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for Paramount's Ruggles of Red Gap (1935), starring Charles Laughton, Mary Boland, and Charlie Ruggles. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
The Canterville Ghost - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for MGM's The Canterville Ghost (1944), starring Charles Laughton and Margaret O'Brien. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
The Bribe - Movie Poster
Here is the American One-Sheet Movie Poster for MGM's The Bribe (1949). One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
The Old Dark House - Lobby Cards
Here are a few Lobby Cards from the Universal horror film The Old Dark House (1932), directed by James Whale. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Rembrandt - Lobby Cards
Here are a few Lobby Cards from the American release of the London Films biopic Rembrandt (1936), starring Charles Laughton. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Charles Laughton - State Express Cigarette Card
This is a small cigarette card of actor Charles Laughton. These trading cards were included in Cigarette packs in the 30's and 40's and were collectible items. Customers could even purchase books to organize and collect these cards. State Express was an active Cigarette Card producer, creating a wide range of cards featuring famous people of which film stars were an often popular draw.

Videos

Movie Clip

Island Of Lost Souls (1932) - Are We Not Men? Accidental guest Parker (Richard Arlen) and Lota (Kathleen Burke), whom he doesn't know is an experimental animal-human hybrid, think they're escaping when they're waylaid by gangs of half-beasts (Bela Lugosi their leader), and Dr. Moreau (Charles Laughton) arrives to restore order, in Universal's Island Of Lost Souls, 1932.
Island Of Lost Souls (1932) - A Laughing Jackass Paul Hurst as Donahue has the unlucky assignment of escorting Ruth (Leila Hyams), come to find her fiancè Parker (Richard Arlen), on the south sea island where he’s been taken in by mad Dr. Moreau (Charles Laughton), knowing nothing as yet about his freaky man-beasts and “bio-anthropological research,” in Island Of Lost Souls, 1932.
Les Miserables (1935) - I Myself Was Born In Prison Villain Javert (Charles Laughton) is confirmed to his police rank, supplying his own character background, in an early scene from Richard Boleslawski's 20th Century Fox production of Victor Hugo's Les Miserables, 1935.
Les Miserables (1935) - A Wonderful Effort Crucial scene nicely wrought by director Richard Boleslawski, Fredric March, whom we know is really the reformed criminal Valjean, now known as M. Madeleine, a prosperous business owner, performs a rescue, stirring the memory of the magistrate Javert (Charles Laughton), his one-time jailer, in 20th Century-Fox’s Les Miserables, 1935.
Les Miserables (1935) - The Good Priest Bishop Bienvenue (Sir Cedric Hardwicke) makes a big deposit in the karma bank, telling the cops that the plates Valjean (Fredric March) stole were in fact a gift, in the 1935 Fox production of Victor Hugo's Les Miserables.
Les Miserables (1935) - Opening, Ten Years In The Galleys Title sequence and first scene introducing Valjean (Fredric March) from director Richard Boleslawski's lavish but efficient 1935 production of Victor Hugo's Les Miserables, from 20th Century Fox.
Les Miserables (1935) - Where's My Bread? Valjean (Fredric March) suffering and Javert (Charles Laughton) observing in director Richard Boleslawski's quick survey of Prisoner #2906's ordeal, from Fox's 1935 production of Victor Hugo's Les Miserables, 1935.
O. Henry's Full House (1952) - Many Kinds Of A Writer Henry Hathaway, among the five credited directors, directs this introduction, John Steinbeck hired to stand in for the deceased author, leading into the first story, featuring Charles Laughton as “Soapy,” in the popular 20th Century-Fox anthology O. Henry’s Full House, 1952.
Salome (1953) - You Will Die In Agony Herod (Charles Laughton) receives wife Herodias (Judith Anderson), alarmed about one John The Baptist, who might be the foretold Jewish messiah, Ezra (Maurice Schwartz) advising, early in Salome, 1953.
Rembrandt (1936) - Now You Owe Me A Kiss Back in Amsterdam ca. 1652, Charles Laughton (title character) meets cheery Hendrickje (Elsa Lanchester, who was Mrs. Laughton at the time) but tangles with the locals, in Alexander Korda’s Rembrandt, 1936.
Rembrandt (1936) - I Can Still See Her Rembrandt (Charles Laughton) is wholly concentrated on painting his recently deceased wife Saskia in this early scene from Alexander Korda's Rembrandt, 1936.
Rembrandt (1936) - Open, He Died In Obscurity Opening credit sequence and tony prologue for Alexander Korda's 1936 production of Rembrandt, starring Charles Laughton, Gertrude Lawrence and Elsa Lanchester.

Trailer

Witness For The Prosecution - (Original Trailer) A British barrister gets caught up in a couple's tangled marital affairs when he defends the husband for murder in Witness for the Prosecution (1957).
Ruggles Of Red Gap - (Re-issue trailer) A British valet (Charles Laughton) must adapt to the Wild West when he is won in a poker game in Ruggles Of Red Gap (1935).
Big Clock, The - (Original Trailer) Ray Milland gets the job of finding the man last seen with his boss' murdered mistress, knowing the evidence will point to him in The Big Clock (1948).
Mutiny On The Bounty (1935) - (Original Trailer) The sadistic Captain Bligh (Charles Laughton) drives his men to revolt during a South Seas expedition in Mutiny on the Bounty (1935).
O. Henry's Full House - (Original Trailer) Five stories reveal O. Henry's gift for the surprise ending with the help of five directors and a host of stars in O. Henry's Full House (1952).
Man from Down Under, The - (Original Trailer) A World War I veteran (Charles Laughton) sneaks two orphans back to his native Australia in The Man From Down Under (1943).
Stand By For Action - (Original Trailer) A haughty Harvard boy (Robert Taylor) is taken down a notch when he sees action in the Pacific in Stand By For Action (1943).
Tuttles of Tahiti, The - (Original Trailer) Charles Laughton heads The Tuttles of Tahiti (1942), a family in the South Seas that goes to any lengths to escape work.
Hunchback of Notre Dame, The - (Re-issue Trailer) A deformed bell ringer rescues a gypsy girl falsely accused of witchcraft in The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939) starring Charles Laughton.
Bribe, The - (Original Trailer) A sultry singer (Ava Gardner) tries to tempt a federal agent (Robert Taylor) from the straight-and-narrow in The Bribe (1949).
Young Bess - (Original Trailer) Jean Simmons plays the daughter of King Henry VIII (Charles Laughton) destined to become Queen Elizabeth I in Young Bess (1953).
Canterville Ghost, The - (Original Trailer) A ghost (Charles Laughton) who died a coward tries to inspire U.S. GIs to become heroes in The Canterville Ghost (1944), directed by Jules Dassin.

Promo

Companions

Elsa Lanchester
Wife
Actor. Co-starred together, married in 1929.
Christopher Isherwood
Companion
Author. Had relationship in the 1940s.

Bibliography

"Charles Laughton : A Difficult Actor"
Simon Callow, Grove Press (1988)
"Charles Laughton : An Intimate Biography"
Charles Higham
"First Day in an Actor's Life : A Comedy Based on the Life of Charles Laughton"
Bruce Zortman
"Elsa Lanchester, Herself"
Elsa Lanchester