Robert Krasker


Director Of Photography

Biography

Accomplished cinematographer who collaborated several times with Carol Reed and is best known for the director's shadow-ridden masterpiece, "The Third Man" (1949).

Filmography

 

Cinematography (Feature Film)

Cry Wolf (1980)
Director Of Photography
Senso (1968)
Director of Photography
The Trap (1967)
Director of Photography
The Heroes of Telemark (1966)
Director of Photography
The Collector (1965)
Director of Photographer, British staff
The Epic That Never Was (I, Claudius) (1965)
Camera Operator ("I, Claudius")
The Heroes of Telemark (To Be Deleted) (1965)
Director Of Photography
The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964)
Camera
The Running Man (1963)
Director of Photography
Birdman of Alcatraz (1962)
Co-photog
The Concrete Jungle (1962)
Director of Photography
Billy Budd (1962)
Director of Photography
Guns of Darkness (1962)
Director of Photography
Romanoff and Juliet (1961)
Director of Photography
El Cid (1961)
Director of Photography
Libel (1959)
Director of Photography
The Doctor's Dilemma (1959)
Director of Photography
The Quiet American (1958)
Photography
Behind The Mask (1958)
Director Of Photography
The Rising of the Moon (1957)
Director of Photography
The Story of Esther Costello (1957)
Director of Photography
Trapeze (1956)
Director of Photography
Alexander the Great (1956)
Director of Photography
That Lady (1955)
Director of Photography
Romeo and Juliet (1954)
Director Of Photography
Never Let Me Go (1953)
Director of Photography
The Malta Story (1953)
Director Of Photography
Another Man's Poison (1952)
Director of Photography
Cry, the Beloved Country (1952)
Director Of Photography
State Secret (1950)
Director Of Photography
The Third Man (1949)
Photography
The Saint Meets the Tiger (1943)
Photography
Rose of Tralee (1942)
Camera Operator
Murder on Diamond Row (1937)
Camera Operator
Men Are Not Gods (1937)
Camera Operator
Things to Come (1936)
Camera Operator
Rembrandt (1936)
Camera Operator
The Rise Of Catherine The Great (1934)
Camera Assistant

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

Red (1976)
Photography
Bonnie Prince Charlie (1948)
Photography
Odd Man Out (1947)
Photography
Uncle Silas (1947)
Photography
Caesar And Cleopatra (1945)
Photography
Brief Encounter (1945)
Photography
Henry V (1944)
Photography
The Lamp Still Burns (1943)
Photography
The Gentle Sex (1943)
Photography
One Of Our Aircraft Is Missing (1941)
Additional Photography

Life Events

1932

Moved to Great Britain, working and training under Georges Perinal at London Films (date approximate)

Videos

Movie Clip

Billy Budd (1962) - What Was His Crime? The merchant ship from which he was pressed still on the horizon, title character Terence Stamp is made to witness the administration of punishment by Master-At-Arms Claggart (Robert Ryan), Peter Ustinov (who also directed and co-wrote) in command, Melvyn Douglas as veteran seaman Dankser, in BIlly Budd, 1962, from the Herman Melville novel.
Billy Budd (1962) - Too Much Perfection With officers Seymour (Paul Rogers) and Ratcliffe (John Neville), Peter Ustinov (who also directed and co-wrote) as Captain Vere considers the promotion of the the title character (Terence Stamp, not seen) and the challenge posed by his abusive Master-At-Arms, on a British fighting ship, ca. 1800, in BIlly Budd, 1962, from the Herman Melville novel.
Billy Budd (1962) - To Subdue All Things Committing the body of a sailor whose death was caused by the cruelty of one commander (Robert Ryan as Claggart), Peter Ustinov as Captain Vere officiates, also directing, from his co-written screenplay, Melvyn Douglas joining the liturgy as Dansker, Terence Stamp as the title character reflects, Victor Brooks and Thomas Heathcote his jaded colleagues, in Billy Budd from the Herman Melville novel.
Billy Budd (1962) - Is It Ignorance Or Irony? Part of a notable exchange, pivotal in the original Herman Melville novel, Terence Stamp as the ingenuous title character converses with his cynical Master-At-Arms Claggart (Robert Ryan), whose role in the death of a colleague he earlier exposed, on board a British man-of-war during the Napoleonic wars, in BIlly Budd, 1962, directed by co-star Peter Ustinov.
Henry V (1944) - Upon The King Director and title character Laurence Olivier elects to offer this segment of the famous speech as interior monologue, on the eve of Agincourt, from act four, scene one of the Shakespeare, interrupted by Erpingham (Morland Graham), from the partly government-financed 1944 production of Henry V.
Brief Encounter (1945) - Idle Gossip Opening scenes, Godby (Stanley Holloway) working bar girl Myrtle (Joyce Carey), Dolly (Everley Gregg) intruding on Laura (Celia Johnson) and Alec (Trevor Howard) who, director David Lean will reveal, are in a desperate private moment, from Brief Encounter, 1945.
Never Let Me Go (1953) - I'm Seeing Molotov On Monday Thwarted thus far seeking permission to marry, American newsman Sutherland (Clark Gable) visits the ambassador in Moscow (Robert Henderson) and introduces the eager Marya (Gene Tierney), in Delmer Daves' Never Let Me Go, 1953.
Brief Encounter (1945) - Noel Coward's Brief Encounter Opening credit sequence for David Lean's acclaimed film from the Noel Coward original screenplay, Brief Encounter, 1945, starring Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson.
Brief Encounter (1945) - Lucky Escape Still narrating in her flashback in her imagined confession, Laura (Celia Johnson) feels contrition if no shame over her visit with new friend Alec, arriving to discover an emergency at home, husband Fred (Cyril Raymond) helping her through, in David Lean's Brief Encounter, 1945.
Brief Encounter (1945) - I Killed Two Patients Laura (Celia Johnson), well into her internal imagined confession to her husband, recalling her first proper sit-down with doctor Alec (Trevor Howard), at her usual luncheon on her Thursday shopping trip, in David Lean's Brief Encounter, 1945.
Brief Encounter (1945) - Romance, I Think Having persuaded husband Fred (Cyril Raymond) that she's not upset over her fainting spell, some poignant chat leads Laura (Celia Johnson) into her narrated flashback in earnest, in Brief Encounter, 1945, directed by David Lean from a Noel Coward play.
Rising Of The Moon, The (1957) - We'll Not Be Needin' The Cork Inspector Dillon (Cyril Cusack) with Dan (Noel Purcell) whom he doesn't want to arrest, moonshiner Mickey (Jack MacGowran) glad he's not the target, in the first segment of John Ford's Irish pastoral The Rising Of The Moon, 1957.

Trailer

Bibliography