Edwin H. Knopf


Producer

Biography

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

The Law and the Lady (1951)
Director
The Rebel (1933)
Director
Nice Women (1931)
Director
Galas de la Paramount (1930)
Director
Paramount on Parade (1930)
Director
The Santa Fe Trail (1930)
Director
The Light of Western Stars (1930)
Director
Only Saps Work (1930)
Director
Slightly Scarlet (1930)
Director
The Border Legion (1930)
Director

Writer (Feature Film)

Mr. Imperium (1951)
Screenwriter
Piccadilly Jim (1936)
Screenwriter
Baby Face Harrington (1935)
Screenwriter
The Wedding Night (1935)
Original Story
The Rebel (1933)
Writer
S.O.S. Iceberg (1933)
Dial
Nice Women (1931)
Screenwriter
Bad Sister (1931)
Dial
East of Borneo (1931)
Screenwriter
Free Love (1931)
Adapted and dial

Producer (Feature Film)

The Vintage (1957)
Producer
Tip on a Dead Jockey (1957)
Producer
Diane (1956)
Producer
Gaby (1956)
Producer
The King's Thief (1955)
Producer
The Glass Slipper (1955)
Producer
The Great Diamond Robbery (1954)
Producer
Lili (1953)
Producer
Scandal at Scourie (1953)
Producer
Fearless Fagan (1952)
Producer
Mr. Imperium (1951)
Producer
Night into Morning (1951)
Producer
The Law and the Lady (1951)
Producer
Malaya (1949)
Producer
Edward, My Son (1949)
Producer
B. F.'s Daughter (1948)
Producer
Cynthia (1947)
Producer
The Sailor Takes a Wife (1946)
Producer
The Secret Heart (1946)
Producer
The Valley of Decision (1945)
Producer
The Cross of Lorraine (1944)
Producer
Cry 'Havoc' (1944)
Producer
The Vanishing Virginian (1942)
Producer
Crossroads (1942)
Producer
The Trial of Mary Dugan (1941)
Producer
I'll Wait for You (1941)
Producer

Music (Feature Film)

Reckless (1935)
Composer

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

B.F.'s Daughter (1948) - Your Pretty Little Head Park Avenue, 1932, breakfasting with his wife (Spring Byington), industrialist B.F. Fulton (Charles Coburn) fumes over a radio commentator’s criticism as daughter Polly (Barbara Stanwyck) appears, sniffing a chance to help her fiancé (Richard Hart), opening MGM’s B.F.’s Daughter, 1948.
Glass Slipper, The (1955) - Goodbye, Cinder Ella! The narrator sounds like Walter Pidgeon because he is, opening the MGM Leslie Caron vehicle, derived from the first published version of Cinderella (1697, by Charles Perrault, Cendrillon ou la petite pantoufle de verre), directed by Charles Walters, music by Bronislau Kaper, dance by Roland Petit for Ballet de Paris, The Glass Slipper, 1955, also starring Michael Wilding.
Glass Slipper, The (1955) - How Cold Is The Water? The prince Charles (Michael Wilding), just returned to “a small European principality,” and pal Kovin (Keenan Wynn) are wandering in the woods at an old favorite site when Leslie Caron, the indignant local tomboy who’s decided she doesn’t mind being called “Cinderella,” shows up with an attitude, their first meeting, in MGM’s The Glass Slipper, 1955.
Glass Slipper, The (1955) - Son Of The Cook More than 40-minutes into the feature, in a sequence dreamed up by servant girl “Ella” (Leslie Caron), who’s been told that Prince Charles (Michael Wilding) is just “the son of the cook of the palace of the duke,” she joins the first dance number, Charles Walters directing, dance by Roland Petit for Ballet de Paris, in MGM’s The Glass Slipper, 1955.
Lili (1953) - You Have No Family? Everyone’s French and idyllic, Jean Pierre Aumont, Kurt Kasznar and Mel Ferrer haggling over fruit when title character Leslie Caron (in her first role after An American In Paris), arrives, her expectations let down, Alex Gerry as a storekeeper, opening the MGM fantasy musical hit Lili, 1953.
Lili (1953) - I'm A Very Interesting Fellow 16-year-old French orphan Leslie Caron (title character), fired from the carnival after failure as a waitress, moping until puppeteer Paul (Mel Ferrer) sees an opportunity, draws her into conference with his puppets, based on other members of the troupe, in MGM’s Lili, 1953.
Diane (1956) - You Have Sometimes Grieved In16th century France after a prologue establishing the historical and romantic stature of the title character, she (Lana Turner) is introduced with her husband the count (Torin Thatcher), David Miller directing for MGM, from a screenplay by Christopher Isherwood, based on historian John Erskine’s story, in Diane, 1956.
Diane (1956) - I See Manliness In His Face Now visiting King Francis I (Pedro Armendariz), presumably at Fontainbleau, petitioning for the release of her husband, the title character (Lana Turner) has been asked, due to her decorative qualities, to stick around, whereupon she meets the ruffian prince Henri (Roger Moore) and the more polite brother dauphin (Ronald Green), in Diane, 1956.
Diane (1956) - We'll Have A Fine Nest Of Italian Plotters Some MGM grandeur as the party has traveled to Marseilles, where the title character (Lana Turner) has trained the prince Henri (Roger Moore) in manners, their own passions bridled, before his wedding to Catherine de Medici (Marisa Pavan), royal staffers Tania Elg and John Lupton handling play-by-play, with several new charaters introduced, in Diane, 1956.
Scandal At Scourie (1953) - Best Ones Were Taken First On an Ontario stopover, traveling west with guardian nuns seeking homes for their charges after a fire, orphan Patsy (Donna Corcoran), hoping to save her goldfish from her bully friends, meets local Mrs. McChesney (Greer Garson, her first scene), in MGM's Scandal At Scourie, 1953.
Scandal At Scourie (1953) - Dictated By Rome Mrs. McChesney (Greer Garson) has not quite convinced her prominent Ontario Protestant storekeeper and mayor husband Patrick (Walter Pidgeon) that they should adopt just-arrived Catholic Quebecois orphan Patsy (Donna Corcoran) permanently, early in MGM's Scandal At Scourie, 1953.
Law And The Lady (1951) - Chemin de Fer On their first adventure in Monte Carlo, ex-servant Jane (Greer Garson) poses as "Lady Loverly," easily causing her newfound escort (Holmes Herbert) to lose at cards, her new partner Nigel (Michael Wilding) collecting, in The Law And The Lady, 1951.

Family

Alfred A Knopf
Brother
Publisher.

Companions

Mary Ellis
Wife
Actor. Divorced.

Bibliography