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    • Schedule Change for James Garner Tribute on Monday, July 28

    • Turner Classic Movies Pays Tribute to James Garner on Monday, July 28 with the following festival of films. This program will replace the previously scheduled movies for that day so please take note.

      The new schedule for Monday, July 28 will be:
      6:00 AM Toward the Unknown
      8:00 AM Shoot-out at Medicine Bend
      9:30 AM Grand Prix
      12:30 PM Cash McCall
      2:15 PM The Wheeler Dealers
      4:00 PM Darby's Rangers
      6:15 PM Mister Buddwing
      8:00 PM The Thrill of it All
      10:00 PM The Americanization of Emily
      12:00 AM The Children's Hour
      2:00 AM Victor/Victoria
      4:30 AM Marlowe



      An enormously likable and well-respected star since the early 1950s, James Garner was an Oscar-nominated American actor with a knack for playing lovable rogues in scores of films and television series. Though his rugged good looks made him a capable leading man in features like "The Great Escape" (1963), "The Americanization of Emily" (1964), and "Grand Prix" (1969), Garner found his greatest fame on the small screen; most notably in two popular series: the tongue-in-cheek Western, "Maverick" (ABC, 1957-1962) and the detective drama "The Rockford Files" (NBC, 1974-1980). Both programs made excellent use of Garner's folksy, underplayed delivery, earning him an Emmy (for "Rockford") and scores of nominations. Unlike many of his contemporaries, he remained exceptionally active in movies and television, as well as scores of commercials, well into his eighth decade.

      Born James Scott Bumgarner in Norman, OK on April 7, 1928, Garner was one of three sons born to Weldon Bumgarner, a carpet layer, and his wife Mildred, who died when Garner was three. The boys - who included brothers Charlie, who died in 1965, and Jack, who followed Garner into acting in the mid-1960s - were sent to live with relatives until 1934, when their father remarried. The stepmother was apparently cut from typical fairytale cloth; in interviews, Garner recalled receiving consistent beatings from the woman, which ended only when he physically attacked her and she split from his father.

      Garner's father relocated to Los Angeles following the divorce, while his sons remained in Oklahoma. Displeased with the options afforded him there, the 16-year-old lied about his age while signing up for the United States Merchant Marines in 1944. A year later, he joined his father in Los Angeles and attempted to earn his diploma at Hollywood High School. Despite being a popular student and a skilled athlete in football and basketball, he dropped out in 1946 and returned to Norman, where he gave high school one final try before dropping out in 1948. Garner later joined the Army and served in Korea, where he earned two Purple Hearts for injuries sustained in the conflict. Those injuries would later dash his hopes of a college career after his return to the United States; he eventually moved back to Los Angeles and worked in a score of odd jobs, including a model for Jantzen's swim trunks.

      Garner's acting career began in 1954 after meeting Paul Gregory, a former classmate from Hollywood High, who was producing the Broadway run of "The Caine Mutiny Court Martial." Gregory got Garner a non-speaking role as a judge in the show, which allowed him to study its star, Henry Fonda, on a nightly basis. He eventually returned to Los Angeles and began working steadily in commercials and episodic television, which lead to a contract at Warner Bros., where he earned $150 a week. The studio also changed his name to "Garner" without his permission, but the new moniker stuck. He made his TV debut in a 1955 episode of "Cheyenne" (ABC, 1955-1963), which was quickly followed by his first feature, "Toward the Unknown," in 1956. That same year, he met Lois Clarke and married her after only 14 days. He became stepfather to her daughter, Kelly, and the couple had a daughter of their own, Greta, who later became a noted writer and - ironically enough, considering his future definitive role - a private investigator.

      Garner worked his way up from featured player to supporting actor in features - including "Sayonara" opposite none other than Marlon Brando in 1957 - before landing the role of gambler, drifter and reluctant hero Bret Maverick on "Maverick" in 1957. Originally envisioned as a standard issue horse opera and not unlike the plethora of cowboy series that dominated the networks at the time, creator Roy Huggins and Garner soon inverted the show's focus - and genre expectations as a whole - to make Maverick into an anti-hero, more interested in cards and relaxation than any sort of heroics. He was still a decent sort, and could be called upon to right wrongs when necessary, but Garner's Maverick did so with his wits; not his fists or guns. Eventually, the show took a decidedly satirical tone, even poking fun at established Western series like "Bonanza" (NBC, 1959-1973) and "Gunsmoke" (CBS, 1955-1975). Audiences flocked to the show as a fresh alternative on a stagnating genre, finding Garner's semi-comic tone enormously appealing. He would receive an Emmy nomination for his performance as Maverick in 1957, and take home a Golden Globe as Most Promising Newcomer in 1958. He would also make a cameo as the character in the 1959 comedy "Alias Jesse James," starring Bob Hope.

      Unfortunately, the network never felt entirely secure with Huggins and Garner's approach, and brought aboard Jack Kelly to play Bret's brother, Bart, who would bring a more traditional style of Western hero in the program. For the next three seasons, Garner and Kelly alternated as the star of the show, and occasionally appeared together in the same episode. But in 1960, he left "Maverick" over a contract dispute, and the show soon faltered before cancellation in 1962. Garner returned to moviemaking, but now as a leading man.

      Though he could more than carry his own in serious drama - he was fine if underutilized as the upstanding fiancée to Shirley Maclaine, who was carrying on an affair with Audrey Hepburn in "The Children's Hour" (1961) - Garner fared best in action pictures, which made excellent use of his tall, athletic frame. When given the chance, he was also surprisingly adept at comedies, to which he could apply his understated humor. He was a fine substitute for Rock Hudson in two Doris Day comedies - "The Thrill of It All," (1963) and "Move Over, Darling" (1964) - and played agreeable variations on his Maverick persona in "The Wheeler Dealers" (1963) and "The Art Of Love" (1965) with Dick Van Dyke and Elke Sommer. Garner also held his own amidst a cast of fellow up-and-comers, including Steve McQueen, James Coburn, Charles Bronson, and David McCallum, in John Sturges' classic World War II film "The Great Escape," and developed an interest in racing after starring in John Frankenheimer's gritty "Grand Prix" (1966). He was occasionally given chances to play outside his established screen persona, most notably in the anti-war drama "The Americanization of Emily" (1964), which earned controversy for Julie Andrews's wartime widow who trades sexual favors for commodities, and "Mr. Buddiwing" (1966), which cast Garner as an amnesiac searching for his identity. Thanks to "Maverick," he was regularly cast in Westerns, where he played everything from violent loners like his take on Wyatt Earp in "Hour of the Gun" (1967) to charming con men, such as in the hit comedy "Support Your Local Sheriff!" (1969), its sequel "Support Your Local Gunfighter" (1971), and the amusing "Skin Game" (1971) with Louis Gossett, Jr.

      After playing an exceptionally laid-back Phillip Marlowe in 1969's "Marlowe" (which featured a show-stopping fight with a pre-stardom Bruce Lee), Garner returned to network television with "Nichols" (NBC, 1971-72). The unusual Western cast Garner as a scheming con man whose get-rich schemes were interrupted by his appointment as sheriff of his small hometown. Audiences never warmed to the unscrupulous character, so he was shot dead in the season finale and replaced by his more benevolent twin - also played by Garner. Unfortunately, the network pulled the plug on the series before viewers could see if the change in direction was an improvement.

      Garner's next series proved to be one of his biggest career triumphs. He reunited with "Maverick" producer Roy Huggins, who teamed with producer Stephen J. Cannell to create "The Rockford Files," which also took a revisionist approach to a well-established TV genre - the detective series. Garner's Jim Maverick was as far afield from the small screen private eyes of the period as one could get - an ex-con with a spotty employment record, he solved low-rent cases (insurance scams, missing persons, and the like) for rock-bottom prices, and preferred to avoid violence at all costs. Everything about Rockford was laid back, from Garner's easygoing delivery to his questionable clothing choices and living situation - a trailer near the home of his retired dad (Noah Beery Jr.). The only nods to hipness were his car - a beautiful Pontiac Firebird - and the show's theme song by Mike Post and Pete Carpenter, which became a Grammy-winning Top 10 hit. Despite the lack of flash, audiences loved the interplay between Garner and Beery and the other series regulars, including Stuart Margolin as former cellmate and pal Angel, and Rockford's disregard for authority figures like the police (though J Santos' Sgt. Dennis Becker was a rare exception). "Rockford" was a moderate success in the ratings during its six-year run - it would become considerably more popular in reruns - and earned Garner several Emmy nominations before he took home the trophy in 1977.

      Despite the acclaim, the daily grind of a series took its toll on Garner's health. He preferred to work long hours and perform his own stunts, which exacerbated problems with his knees that he had incurred in Korea, and later resulted in back problems and an ulcer. At the advice of doctors, he left the show in 1980, much to the disappointment of its many fans. He attempted to fulfill his contract to NBC by launching a revival of "Maverick" in various forms - he had brought back the character in a 1978 TV-movie, "The New Maverick," in the debut episode of a failed spinoff series, "Young Maverick" (NBC, 1979); but "Bret Maverick" (NBC, 1981), was pulled after just 18 episodes.

      Garner would later engage in a bitter and protracted legal battle with NBC over the profits from "Rockford," which the network claimed had operated in the red for several seasons. Garner, who co-produced the series through his Cherokee Productions, disagreed, and the dispute remained unsettled until the early 1990s, when the network paid the actor an undisclosed sum out of court. From 1994 through 1999, Garner and most of the original "Rockford" cast (save Noah Beery, who died in 1994) reunited for a string of popular TV-movies which managed to recapture the low-key charm of the original series and netted Garner two Screen Actors Guild award nominations.

      The 1980s were a remarkably prolific and well-regarded period in Garner's career. He appeared in several features during the decade, most notably Blake Edwards' "Victor/Victoria" (1982) as the bewildered love interest for Julie Andrews' cross-dressing chanteuse, and earned his only Oscar nomination for the sweet, unassuming drama "Murphy's Romance" (1985) as the courtly town druggist who sweeps divorcee Sally Field off her feet. But he found regular and more substantial work in television movies, which frequently the now-50ish Garner in more serious roles. He co-starred with Mary Tyler Moore in an adaptation of Martha Weinman Lear's "Heartsounds" (1984), a chronicle of the difficulties faced by a couple after the husband underg s double bypass heart surgery, and teamed with James Woods in a pair of exceptional films - "Promise" (1985), with Garner as the brother of a schizophrenic (Woods), and "My Name Is Bill W." (1989), which explored the origins of Alcoholics Anonymous - which he also co-produced. There was also fine work in the miniseries "Space" (1985), with Garner as real-life Senator Norman Grant, who oversaw the development of the U.S. space program, and the Southern family drama "Decoration Day" (1990). For this impressive body of work, Garner received numerous Emmy and Golden Globe nominations, and brought home two awards - an Emmy for Outstanding Drama Special for "Promise" and a Golden Globe for Best Actor in "Decoration Day."

      Garner's health took an alarming turn in the late 1980s when he was forced to undergo quintuple bypass surgery. Earning his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1990 undoubtedly raised his spirits, and he continued with his busy work schedule, which saw him make a return to series work with "Man of the People" (NBC, 1991), a comedy about a scam artist appointed to a city council chair in a small California town. Despite solid ratings, the show was axed after only 10 episodes. Garner then resumed his TV-movie career, which balanced the crowd-pleasing "Rockford" reunions with more dramatic fare like "Barbarians at the Gate" (1993), which cast him in another Golden Globe-winning role as Nabisco chief F. Ross Johnson, who faces overwhelming opposition in his attempt to buy out the rest of the company's shareholders, and "Streets of Laredo" (1995), a sequel to the massively popular "Lonesome Dove" (1989) with Garner in Tommy Lee Jones' role. Garner also made a few returns to feature films, most notable the big-screen adaptation of "Maverick" (1994), now with Mel Gibson in the role and Garner as his father, and "Fire in the Sky" (1993) as a cagey Texas Ranger investigating claims of UFO abductions.

      Garner ended the 1990s with solid work in the detective drama "Twilight" (1998) opposite a galaxy of aging but well-regarded stars, including Paul Newman, Gene Hackman, Susan Sarandon and Stockard Channing, and the TV-movie "Legalese" (1998) as a slick celebrity lawyer defending an actress accused of murder. He began the new millennium with surgery on both knees, but the now-72-year-old Garner refused to slow down. He joined the cast of "Chicago Hope" (CBS, 1994-2000) in its final season to play the head of the hospital, then played a retired astronaut called back to duty for Clint Eastwood's rousing feature "Space Cowboys" (2000). More series work followed - he was a conservative Supreme Court judge on the short-lived "First Monday" (CBS, 2001), and later voiced an exceptionally laid-back Almighty in the animated series "God, the Devil and Bob" (NBC, 2000).

      In 2003, Garner made interesting headlines by stepping in to replace the late John Ritter as the father figure on "8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter" (ABC, 2002-05). Originally envisioned as a guest shot, Garner (who played series regular Katey Sagal's father) was later hired as a cast member, along with his former "Support Your Local Gunfighter" co-star Suzanne Pleshette, and stayed with the series until its cancellation in 2005. During this period, he also enjoyed two sizable hits at the movies - as Sandra Bullock's father in "The Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood" (2002), and as the devoted husband to Alzheimer's-stricken Gena Rowlands in the formidable weeper "The Notebook" (2004), which earned him another Screen Actors Guild award nod. A year later, the organization would give him their Lifetime Achievement Award.

      In addition to his lengthy acting career, Garner was in demand as a commercial spokesman and voice-over artist. In the 1970s, he appeared alongside Mariette Hartley in a series of TV spots for Polaroid that were almost as well-known as his work on "Rockford Files." The pair's chemistry was so palpable that many viewers mistook them for real-life spouses. Later, he replaced the late James Coburn as the voice of Chevrolet's "Like a Rock" campaign. Garner also lent his time and services to several charitable causes, including the National Support Committee for the Native American Rights Fund (Garner was part Cherokee) and the National Advisory Board of the United States High School Golf Association. In 2008, the seemingly unstoppable force that was Garner underwent surgery for a minor stroke. Doctors gave his prognosis in April of that year as positive, giving fans a sigh of relief.

      (Bio courtesy of TCMDb)

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  1. New Books

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    • Elizabeth and Michael

    • By Donald Bogle

      One of the country's leading authorities on popular entertainment presents an eye-opening and unique biography of two larger-than-life legends--Elizabeth Taylor and Michael Jackson--and their unlikely yet enduring friendship.

      From the moment Elizabeth Taylor and Michael Jackson met, they were hooked on each other. He peered into her violet eyes and was transfixed; she, in turn, was dazzled by his talent, intrigued by his sweet-tempered childlike personality, and moved by the stories she had already heard about his troubled early life. Soon a deep friendship blossomed, unexpectedly unlike anything either had ever experienced. Through thick and thin, through their various emotional upheavals, through the peaks and valleys of their careers, through their personal traumas and heartaches, through the unending health issues and extreme physical pain that each experienced, and through the glare of the often merciless public spotlight, their bond held them together, and their love for each other endured.


      Donald Bogle skillfully recreates the moving narrative of Taylor and Jackson's experiences together and their intense emotional connection, without shying away from the controversies that swirled around them. Through interviews with friends and acquaintances of the two stars, as well as anonymous but credible sources, Elizabeth and Michael emerges as a tender, intimate look at this famous "odd couple" and a treasure to their millions of fans.

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    • Robert Wagner's I LOVED HER IN THE MOVIES: Memories of Hollywood's Legendary Actresses

    • By Robert Wagner and Scott Eyman

      In a career that has spanned over sixty years, Robert Wagner has witnessed the twilight of the Golden Age of Hollywood and the rise of television, becoming a beloved star in both film and TV. During this time, he became acquainted, both professionally and socially, with many of the greatest female screen personalities of all time. I LOVED HER IN THE MOVIES: Memories of Hollywood's Legendary Actresses (On-sale: 11/15/16) by Robert Wagner, with co-author Scott Eyman, provides an intimate and revealing account of the charisma of these women on film, why they became stars, and how their specific emotional and dramatic chemistries affected the choices they made both as actresses and as women.

      I LOVED HER IN THE MOVIES offers a privileged look behind the scenes at some of the most well-known women in show business. Among Wagner's subjects are Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Marilyn Monroe, Gloria Swanson, Norma Shearer, Loretta Young, Joan Blondell, Irene Dunne, Rosalind Russell, Dorothy Lamour, Debra Paget, Jean Peters, Linda Darnell, Betty Hutton, Raquel Welch, Glenn Close, and the two actresses whom he ultimately married, Natalie Wood and Jill St. John. In addition to offering perceptive commentary on these women, Wagner examines topics like the strange alchemy of the camera--how it can transform the attractive into the stunning, and vice-versa--and how the introduction of color brought a new erotic charge to movies--one that enabled these actresses to become aggressively sexual beings in a way that that black and white films had only hinted at.


      Robert Wagner is the star of such films as A Kiss Before Dying, The Longest Day, The Pink Panther, and most recently, the Austin Powers franchise. On television, he starred in It Takes a Thief (with Fred Astaire), Switch (with Eddie Albert and Sharon Gless), and Hart to Hart (with Stefanie Powers). He has recently appeared on Two and a Half Men and NCIS. He is married to actress Jill St. John.

      Scott Eyman is the author of eleven books about the movies, including Lion of Hollywood: The Life of Louis B. Mayer (which the Wall Street Journal called one of the five best books ever written about Hollywood), Empire of Dreams: The Epic Life of Cecil B. DeMille, and more recently, John Wayne: The Life and Legend.

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    • King of Jazz: Paul Whiteman's Technicolor Revue

    • King of Jazz: Paul Whiteman's Technicolor Revue tells the story of the making, release, and restoration of Universal's 1930 Technicolor extravaganza King of Jazz. Authors James Layton and David Pierce have uncovered original artwork, studio production files, behind-the-scenes photographs, personal papers, unpublished interviews, and a host of other previously unseen documentation. The book offers a richly illustrated narrative with broader context on the film's diverse musical and theatrical influences. The story concludes with an in-depth look at the challenges Universal overcame in restoring the film in 2016. Additionally, the book's appendix provides a comprehensive guide to all of the film's performers, music, alternate versions, and deleted scenes.

      King of Jazz was one of the most ambitious films ever to emerge from Hollywood. Just as movie musicals were being invented in 1929, Universal Pictures brought together Paul Whiteman, leader of the country's top dance orchestra; John Murray Anderson, director of spectacular Broadway revues; a top ensemble of dancers and singers; early Technicolor; and a near unlimited budget. The film's highlights include a dazzling interpretation of George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue," which Whiteman had introduced to the public in 1924; Walter Lantz's "A Fable in Jazz," the first cartoon in Technicolor; and Anderson's grand finale "The Melting Pot of Music," a visualization of popular music's many influences and styles. The film is not only a unique document of Anderson's theatrical vision and Whiteman's band at its peak, but also of several of America's leading performers of the late 1920s, including Bing Crosby in his first screen appearance, and the Russell Markert Dancers, who would soon become Radio City Music Hall's famous Rockettes.


      James Layton is Manager of the Museum of Modern Art's Celeste Bartos Film Preservation Center. Prior to this he worked at George Eastman House in Rochester, NY, where he curated two gallery exhibitions and the website Technicolor 100. Layton has also acted as Cataloguer and Workflow Coordinator at the East Anglian Film Archive in Norwich, UK, and is co-author of the Image Permanence Institute's informational poster Knowing and Protecting Motion Picture Film (2009).

      David Pierce is an independent film historian and archivist. He was formerly the Head of Preservation and Curator of the National Film and Television Archive at the British Film Institute. His articles have appeared in numerous journals, and his report on the survival of American silent feature films was published by the Library of Congress in 2013. He founded the Media History Digital Library, providing free online access to millions of pages of motion picture magazines and books.

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    • THE ESSENTIALS: 52 Must-See Movies and Why They Matter

    • By Jeremy Arnold
      Forward by Robert Osborne

      Since its inception on Turner Classic Movies in 2001, The Essentials has become the ultimate for movie lovers to expand their knowledge of must-see cinema and discover or revisit landmark films that have had a lasting impact on audiences everywhere.

      Based on the hit series, THE ESSENTIALS by Jeremy Arnold showcases 52 must-see movies from the silent era to modern times. Readers can enjoy one film per week, like on the show, for a year of great viewing, or indulge in a movie-watching binge-fest. Each film is profiled with entertaining discourse on why it's an Essential, and running commentary is provided by TCM's Robert Osborne and Essentials guest hosts past and present: Sally Field, Drew Barrymore, Alec Baldwin, Rose McGowan, Carrie Fisher, Molly Haskell, Peter Bogdanovich, Sydney Pollack, and Rob Reiner.

      Featuring full-color and black-and-white photography of the greatest stars in movie history throughout, THE ESSENTIALS is the ultimate curated guide to 52 films that define the meaning of the word "classic."


      Jeremy Arnold, a writer and film historian, is the author of Lawrence of Arabia: The 50th Anniversary, a coffee-table book companion to that film's Blu-ray release. In addition to his work for numerous film trade publications, he has written over five hundred programming articles for the Turner Classic Movies website and contributed audio commentaries and historical essays to the DVD and Blu-ray releases of classic films.

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  1. DVD Reviews

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    • Dick Dinman Salutes Undervalued Star Van Johnson!

    • DICK DINMAN SALUTES UNDERVALUED STAR VAN JOHNSON: Kino Lorber's KL Studio Classics division has just released on Blu-ray a sparkling brand new 4K restoration of the riveting suspense thriller 23 PACES TO BAKER STREET and producer/host Dick Dinman welcomes noted author and classic film aficionado John McElwee to the show as both pay tribute to the versatile and undervalued 23 PACES TO BAKER STREET star Van Johnson.

      PLUS: "Dick's Picks" salutes KL Studio Classics Blu-ray releases of I WAKE UP SCREAMING, Elia Kazan's BOOMERANG, THE HOUSE ON 92nd STREET, THE LODGER, Preston Sturges' BEAUTIFUL BLONDE FROM BASHFUL BEND, Fritz Lang's WESTERN UNION, Henry King's DAVID & BATHSHEBA and PRINCE OF FOXES, NO HIGHWAY IN THE SKY, THE SICILIAN CLAN and BOY ON A DOLPHIN (stunning new 4K restoration!).

      EXTRA!
      DICK DINMAN SALUTES COHEN'S CHABROL COLLECTION!


      The award-winning DICK DINMAN'S DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR is the only show devoted to Golden Age Movie Classics as they become available on DVD and Blu-ray. Your producer/host Dick Dinman includes a generous selection of classic scenes, classic film music and one-on-one interviews with stars, producers, and directors. To hear these as well as other DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR shows please go to www.dvdclassicscorner.com or www.dvdclassicscorner.net.

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    • Dick Dinman & William Wellman Jr. Salute BATTLEGROUND!

    • DICK DINMAN & WILLIAM WELLMAN JR. SALUTE "BATTLEGROUND!": BATTLEGROUND remains producer/host Dick Dinman's all-time favorite WW2 film and distinguished actor, writer and producer William Wellman Jr. rejoins Dick as both salute William Wellman's Oscar-winning once in a lifetime epic military drama which has just been beautifully remastered on Blu-ray by the Warner Archive.

      The award-winning DICK DINMAN'S DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR is the only show devoted to Golden Age Movie Classics as they become available on DVD and Blu-ray. Your producer/host Dick Dinman includes a generous selection of classic scenes, classic film music and one-on-one interviews with stars, producers, and directors. To hear these as well as other DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR shows please go to www.dvdclassicscorner.com or www.dvdclassicscorner.net.

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    • Dick Dinman & Eddie Muller are ON DANGEROUS GROUND!

    • DICK DINMAN & EDDIE MULLER ARE "ON DANGEROUS GROUND": The Warner Archive has just released an astonishing looking (and sounding!) Blu-ray rendition of Nicholas Ray's dark yet hypnotically beautiful film noir ON DANGEROUS GROUND which features a steely yet sensitive performance from noir icon Robert Ryan that easily ranks up there with his finest efforts ever and producer/host Dick Dinman and his guest "Czar of Noir" Eddie Muller dissect the various qualities which make this film so captivatingly unique (including the plaintively emotional score by Bernard Herrmann which was one of his two favorites).

      PLUS: SHORT TAKES: Kino's Kl Classics' THE HOUSE ON 92nd STREET, DAISY KENYON and Cohen Film Collection's SUDDEN FEAR.

      COMING ATTRACTIONS: The Warner Archives' BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK and Twilight Time's KISS OF DEATH.

      The award-winning DICK DINMAN'S DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR is the only show devoted to Golden Age Movie Classics as they become available on DVD and Blu-ray. Your producer/host Dick Dinman includes a generous selection of classic scenes, classic film music and one-on-one interviews with stars, producers, and directors. To hear these as well as other DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR shows please go to www.dvdclassicscorner.com or www.dvdclassicscorner.net.

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    • Dick Dinman & Eddie Muller Explore THE ASPHALT JUNGLE!

    • DICK DINMAN & EDDIE MULLER EXPLORE "THE ASPHALT JUNGLE": Producer/host Dick Dinman welcomes back the "Czar of Noir" himself Eddie Muller as both celebrate the Criterion Collection's pristine release on Blu-ray of John Huston's THE ASPHALT JUNGLE which remains conceivably the greatest "heist/noir" masterwork ever committed to celluloid. (It's early in the year but its difficult to conceive that any home video outfit in the ensuing year will be able to top the astonishing "special features" included on this sensational disc.)

      PLUS: Show opener "Dick's Picks" salutes the Criterion Collection's recent Blu-ray releases of Robert Altman's McCABE & MRS. MILLER, Marlon Brando's ONE EYED JACKS and Howard Hawks' HIS GIRL FRIDAY.

      COMING SOON: DICK DINMAN & EDDIE MULLER ARE "ON DANGEROUS GROUND"!

      The award-winning DICK DINMAN'S DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR is the only show devoted to Golden Age Movie Classics as they become available on DVD and Blu-ray. Your producer/host Dick Dinman includes a generous selection of classic scenes, classic film music and one-on-one interviews with stars, producers, and directors. To hear these as well as other DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR shows please go to www.dvdclassicscorner.com or www.dvdclassicscorner.net.

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  1. Press Release

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    • Alec Baldwin to Host TCM's THE ESSENTIALS


    • Legendary Late Night Host David Letterman, Emmy and Golden Globe® Winner Tina Fey and Oscar-Winning Director William Friedkin Set to Join as Special Guests Throughout the Season.

      Premieres May 6 & Airs Saturdays at 8 p.m.



      Turner Classic Movies announced that Emmy® winner and Oscar® nominee Alec Baldwin will host The Essentials, TCM's popular franchise showcasing "must see" classic films. Joining Baldwin each week throughout the season will be one of three special guests: late-night television icon David Letterman, acclaimed actress, writer and comedian Tina Fey and legendary filmmaker William Friedkin. Together, Baldwin and his guests will introduce a hand-picked classic and offer color commentary on its cultural significance, its influence on other films, behind-the-scenes stories and their own personal reflections. The new season of The Essentials, which airs every Saturday night, premieres May 6 at 8 p.m. (ET).

      The Essentials will kick off with special guest David Letterman joining Baldwin to discuss a plethora of poplar classics including:
      • The Bad and the Beautiful (1952) - airing May 6
      • East of Eden (1955) - airing on May 13
      • No Time for Sergeants (1958) - airing on May 27
      • The Big Sleep (1946) - airing on June 16

      Tina Fey will make her guest appearance starting on June 24 to discuss her favorite classic films including:
      • Rear Window (1954) - airing June 24
      • The Lady Eve (1941) - airing on July 1
      • The Bride of Frankenstein (1935) - airing on July 8
      • Singin' in the Rain (1952) - airing on August 5

      Rounding out the entertaining new season, William Friedkin will join Baldwin to highlight another round of notable films such as:
      • The Quiet Man (1952) - airing on Aug. 12
      • The Manchurian Candidate (1962) - airing on Aug. 19
      • 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) - airing on Sept. 2
      • The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) - airing on Sept. 23

      Baldwin takes over The Essential's hosting duties following the death of his close friend and colleague, Robert Osborne, who hosted the franchise from 2006 to 2015. A longtime friend of TCM and supporter of classic films, Baldwin has appeared frequently on the network, including as co-host of The Essentials with Robert Osborne from 2009 to 2011. He demonstrated his skill as an interviewer in 2008, when he joined one of his idols, Gene Wilder, for an hour-long discussion at Wilder's home in the special Role Model: Gene Wilder. Baldwin turned the tables on Osborne in 2015 by interviewing the longtime TCM host for Private Screenings: Robert Osborne, a one-hour special that premiered as part of TCM's 20th Anniversary celebration. This past October, Baldwin was the on-air host for a month-long look at the world's greatest and most influential documentaries for TCM's Spotlight showcase.

      "I have some big shoes to fill hosting The Essentials, and I plan on doing Bob proud with this new season of The Essentials," said Baldwin. "Dave, Tina and Billy each bring a unique perspective to the movies in our lineup, and they have some fascinating, and even surprising, insights to share as we shine a spotlight on some of our favorite 'must-see' films from over a century of epic moviemaking."

      Additionally, select titles from The Essentials will also be available at 30,000 feet through Delta Studio, Delta Air Lines' industry-leading, free in-flight entertainment collection. Delta operates the world's largest in-flight entertainment-equipped fleet, offering up to 300 movies, 750 TV shows, 100 foreign film titles, 2,400 songs, 18 channels of live satellite TV on select aircraft and a selection of games on aircraft with seat-back entertainment systems.

      To view a promo and for more information including a complete schedule, bios, images and film information, please visit tcm.com/essentials.

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Sabrina (1954) DVD
$5.45
was $8.98
Some Like It Hot DVD
$11.21
was $14.98
The Randolph Scott Round-Up: Volume 2 DVD
$11.21
was $14.98
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  •  
  • Wednesday, March 20, 2011

  • Removed: 10:00pm Springfield Rifle
    12:00pm Casablanca
    Added: 1:00pm Virginia City
    12:15pm Casablanca
  •  
  • Wednesday, March 20, 2011

  • Removed: 10:00pm Springfield Rifle
    12:00pm Casablanca
    Added: 1:00pm Virginia City
    12:15pm Casablanca
  •  
  • Wednesday, March 20, 2011

  • Removed: 10:00pm Springfield Rifle
    12:00pm Casablanca
    Added: 1:00pm Virginia City
    12:15pm Casablanca