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  1. Top News Stories

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    • Home of the Brave on Blu-ray

    • The socially progressive movies of the early postwar years were a serious movement and not a fad. Sam Goldwyn's prestigious production The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) offered a realistic view of the harsh welcome extended to returning veterans, and its success encouraged a brief burst of issue-related pictures, until the movement was silenced by the blacklist. Producers Walter Wanger and Darryl F. Zanuck had been associated with subject matter considered politically leftist before the war. Among others, they were joined by Louis de Rochemont (Lost Boundaries) (1949) and Robert Stillman (Try and Get Me!) (1950) in making controversial movies with the overt purpose of raising public awareness. In his position as a studio production head, Zanuck did his best to protect 'suspect' writers and directors from the blacklist.

      Back in the 1940s it was an act of courage for a movie to criticize the American status quo, or to tell the truth about deplorable social inequities. The Mervyn LeRoy-Albert Maltz-Frank Sinatra short subject The House I Live In (1945) was a simple plea for religious tolerance, yet it caused a minor conservative uproar. Elia Kazan's Gentleman's Agreement seems rather self-important now, but in 1947 a movie targeting anti-Semitism was a very big deal. Of course, most of these films were as commercially oriented as any Hollywood product. Producers claimed to be telling the whole truth even as their films made significant compromises in search of a wide audience. The murder victim in the breakthrough thriller Crossfire (1947) was originally written as a homosexual, but the existence of gays was too much for the Production Code so the victim became a Jew.

      A producer who frequently characterized himself as a brave pioneer tackling the tough subjects was Stanley Kramer. Kramer tried a number of genres, coming up with worthy non-hits (Member of the Wedding (1952), The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T (1953)) but also a few popular winners (High Noon (1952), The Wild One (1953)). To Kramer, really powerful drama always meant controversy. His earlier shows included an unusual story about handicapped war veteran, and a pre- Psycho thriller about a deranged serial killer. Almost every one of Kramer's later films would address a 'big issue': medical ethics, race prejudice, nuclear war, the Scopes 'monkey trial', and so forth. Unkind reviewers remarked that his pictures oversimplified complex problems for public consumption.

      From the very beginning, Stanley Kramer promoted the idea that he and his creative collaborators were demonstrating great moral courage by daring to tell an important truth. For his third production, Kramer asked his close writing associate Carl Foreman to adapt a 1946 stage play by Arthur Laurents. Home of the Brave (1949). Laurents' 'problem minority' character was Jewish, but the film adaptation makes him an African-American. Arthur Laurents said that when he asked about the change, Kramer replied, "Jews have been done." Kramer wanted to 'blow the lid off the race issue', not revisit Gentleman's Agreement. Although the shift of the central character from Jewish to black fares more smoothly in some respects than it does in others, the film is now considered the archetype of a socially conscious issue film.

      In the South Pacific of 1944, an army doctor (Jeff Corey) has only a couple of days to shake Private Peter Moss (James Edwards) out of a psychosomatic inability to walk. Moss just returned from a near-suicide mission to survey a Japanese-held island. The mission leader was young Major Robinson (Douglas Dick), and in flashbacks we meet Moss's fellow volunteers Finch (Lloyd Bridges), Sergeant Mingo (Frank Lovejoy) and T.J. Everett (Steve Brodie), all of whom are white. Mingo isn't bothered by Moss's skin color, and Finch and Moss were best pals in high school. But T.J. Everett is a bigot. He initially thinks that serving alongside a black will be impossible, and when they get to the island his caustic remarks about Moss's color put the mission on edge. After Finch lets slip a prejudicial comment as well, Moss's hopes for group acceptance vanish. Japanese snipers complicate the team's withdrawal. Unable to save the one comrade he still trusts, Moss gets the notion that he is a coward, and loses the ability to use his legs.

      The smartly conceived Home of the Brave combines themes of combat, race prejudice and psychology. Director Mark Robson and screenwriter Carl Foreman were fresh from Kramer's previous hit Champion (1949). Except for some stock footage and a scene shot on a Malibu beach, the entire picture was filmed on modest interior sets. Dimitri Tiomkin's busy orchestral score evokes a feeling of a much bigger production.

      Robson's direction and the well-chosen cast make Laurents' play feel concentrated instead of claustrophobic. Douglas Dick's Major Robinson thinks at first that a mistake has been made with Moss, but his commanding officer straightens him out: "What color is he? I don't care if he's purple. We need him for this mission." Lloyd Bridges is hale 'n' hearty as Finch. As we see in another flashback, Finch tried to be a good pal to Peter Moss back in school, extending an invitation to a post-graduation party that Moss couldn't/wouldn't attend. Good actor Steve Brodie is most noted for playing unreliable or treacherous characters in films noir like Out of the Past (1947). Brodie's T.J. is an unusually credible racist in that he's ignorantly unaware that his 'harmless' jokes and comments give offense. Frank Lovejoy's levelheaded Sergeant Mingo is alone among the group in simply accepting Moss for what he is, another soldier doing his job. The film's stage origins do show through on occasion. Stuck in a high-pressure situation on an enemy island, Mingo takes time out to recite poetry.

      The talented James Edwards was a true Hollywood barrier breaker several years before the arrival of Sidney Poitier. Unlike most every other black film actor of the late '40s, Edwards seldom played servants or African natives. He instead had standout roles in pictures as diverse as Member of the Wedding, The Phenix City Story (1955), The Killing (1956), The Manchurian Candidate (1962) and The Sandpiper (1965). Edwards' Private Peter Moss is a solid underdog, and an optimist willing to earn his position in the special unit. The screenplay doesn't position him as a hero, military or moral. In the high school flashback he already seems to be questioning why his buddy Finch is being so friendly. Under the stress of the mission, he is quick to resent T.J. and Finch's racial slurs.

      The racial tension makes itself felt as soon as Private Moss appears, and the stressful mission brings it out into the open. The word 'nigger' hadn't been allowed in American movies since the Production Code came in, and its return in a widely distributed film was surely a surprise to audiences. Had the show simply charted a case of white-on-black prejudice it might have had only a sensational, perhaps exploitative impact. But Home of the Brave gives Moss a much more complicated reaction. Although it may now seem like something from a '50s live TV drama, Moss's psychological trauma, converting his feelings of low self-esteem into a physical impairment, is the best part of the movie. James Edwards fully expresses Moss's anguish, and his interplay with Jeff Corey's highly motivated medic is exemplary. The 'new' psychology was a popular theme in '40s pictures, and Home of the Brave uses it to make an important statement: racial prejudice is a society-wide mental illness stemming from ignorance and insecurity.

      The changing of Moss from a Jew to a black puts a strain on the show's credibility, mainly because the issues with the two minorities are not really interchangeable. The film's high school flashback seems forced, and false. Moss is uncomfortable around Finch for subtle reasons, when everyone on campus including Finch would surely be aware that a white student associating with a black student would at best be considered socially 'uncomfortable'. Even if Moss were a star athlete, it might not have made much of a difference.

      The "hard hitting" movie also soft-pedals the facts about racial segregation in WW2. Carl Foreman's script implies that Major Robinson is assigned a black surveyor due to a lack of manpower. This would seem an extraordinary circumstance. There were obviously qualified black engineers and surveyors in the 1940s, but the entire wartime Army was completely segregated. Most black combat units were 'held in reserve', and instead assigned to duties like driving trucks. President Truman didn't integrate the armed services until 1948. In his autobiography, Arthur Laurents noted that not a single critic pointed out what any veteran would recognize as a glaring misrepresentation. The film pretends that official racism in the armed forces had never existed, sweeping the issue under the rug. Does this put producer Kramer's liberal commitment in question, or is it just another example of an unavoidable Hollywood compromise?

      In general, the racial animus expressed in Home of the Brave would seem to be grossly understated. A quick read of Studs Terkel's book The Good War gives the impression that race hatred in the U.S. Army was so intense that many white soldiers considered blacks as much the enemy as the Germans or Japanese. It's much more likely that even the fair-minded Sergeant Mingo would reject Moss, as an unnecessary complication to a job that was tough enough already. A black audience of 1949 might reject the Peter Moss character as well, for the reason that he has supposedly lived in America for twenty years yet seems unrealistically unaware of the scope and depth of race hatred. In general, African-American audiences had little use for most of Hollywood's 'social issue' films about black America.

      The story made much better sense as Arthur Laurents wrote it. Anti-Semitic hatred isn't any less vicious, but bigots first have to identify their target for abuse through something less obvious than skin color. American Jews surely endured their share of discrimination in the armed forces, but they were allowed to serve throughout the services and were considered equals in the military hierarchy. It is far more credible that a Jewish soldier with an optimistic attitude might undergo a gradual disillusionment and crisis of self-doubt such as is seen in Home of the Brave. Arthur Laurents named his Jewish private Peter Coen, nicknamed 'Coney'. We can imagine Pete Coen trying not to hurt Finch's feelings as he makes excuses for not attending a party where he wouldn't be made welcome. And we can better imagine Pete Coen eager to be part of an important stealth mission, only to endure psychological strain when he realizes that he's not going to be accepted there either. All it takes to ruin mission solidarity is one mouthy bigot like T.J..

      Through clever promotion and marketing Stanley Kramer made the impressive Home of the Brave into a mini-cause cèlébre. Arthur Laurents' play had closed in New York after just a couple of weeks, but the movie has long been touted as a milestone for race-related filmmaking. Its creative contributors certainly felt the political backlash of the right wing -- Jeff Corey and Carl Foreman were blacklisted and Lloyd Bridges had his own close scrape with the committees. Frank Lovejoy seems to have come out of this period unscathed, but his filmography takes an abrupt turn to the right just a few films later. After Cy Endfield's socially critical Try and Get Me!, Lovejoy starred in the hysterical anti-Red thriller I Was a Communist for the FBI (1951), and was suddenly typed as a specialist in salute-the-flag soldiers and cops.

      Producer Stanley Kramer eventually took an aggressive and outspoken attitude toward the Hollywood blacklist. When asked why he hired a 'tainted' writer for his The Defiant Ones, Kramer retorted that America was a free country and he'd not let anyone tell him who he could and could not hire. This left his ideological adversary Ronald Reagan to back-pedal, claiming that blacklisted writers were targeted not for their scripts, but for their agitation in labor guilds. Mr. Kramer wore the label "nervy liberal" with pride.

      Olive Films' disc of Home of the Brave is another Blu-ray of a Stanley Kramer production originally released through United Artists. It once showed on TV fairly frequently but disappeared in the 1970s. The film elements appear to be in excellent condition. Cinematographer Robert De Grasse's classy B&W images often make us forget that we're mostly looking at a studio-concocted island jungle set. The bold music score by Dimitri Tiomkin expands the film's canvas, pulling in plenty of quotes from other bits of music. Home of the Brave remains one of the most adventurous race-equality issue films of the late 1940s.

      By Glenn Erickson

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  1. New Books

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    • Elizabeth and Michael

    • By Donald Bogle

      One of the country's leading authorities on popular entertainment presents an eye-opening and unique biography of two larger-than-life legends--Elizabeth Taylor and Michael Jackson--and their unlikely yet enduring friendship.

      From the moment Elizabeth Taylor and Michael Jackson met, they were hooked on each other. He peered into her violet eyes and was transfixed; she, in turn, was dazzled by his talent, intrigued by his sweet-tempered childlike personality, and moved by the stories she had already heard about his troubled early life. Soon a deep friendship blossomed, unexpectedly unlike anything either had ever experienced. Through thick and thin, through their various emotional upheavals, through the peaks and valleys of their careers, through their personal traumas and heartaches, through the unending health issues and extreme physical pain that each experienced, and through the glare of the often merciless public spotlight, their bond held them together, and their love for each other endured.


      Donald Bogle skillfully recreates the moving narrative of Taylor and Jackson's experiences together and their intense emotional connection, without shying away from the controversies that swirled around them. Through interviews with friends and acquaintances of the two stars, as well as anonymous but credible sources, Elizabeth and Michael emerges as a tender, intimate look at this famous "odd couple" and a treasure to their millions of fans.

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    • Robert Wagner's I LOVED HER IN THE MOVIES: Memories of Hollywood's Legendary Actresses

    • By Robert Wagner and Scott Eyman

      In a career that has spanned over sixty years, Robert Wagner has witnessed the twilight of the Golden Age of Hollywood and the rise of television, becoming a beloved star in both film and TV. During this time, he became acquainted, both professionally and socially, with many of the greatest female screen personalities of all time. I LOVED HER IN THE MOVIES: Memories of Hollywood's Legendary Actresses (On-sale: 11/15/16) by Robert Wagner, with co-author Scott Eyman, provides an intimate and revealing account of the charisma of these women on film, why they became stars, and how their specific emotional and dramatic chemistries affected the choices they made both as actresses and as women.

      I LOVED HER IN THE MOVIES offers a privileged look behind the scenes at some of the most well-known women in show business. Among Wagner's subjects are Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Marilyn Monroe, Gloria Swanson, Norma Shearer, Loretta Young, Joan Blondell, Irene Dunne, Rosalind Russell, Dorothy Lamour, Debra Paget, Jean Peters, Linda Darnell, Betty Hutton, Raquel Welch, Glenn Close, and the two actresses whom he ultimately married, Natalie Wood and Jill St. John. In addition to offering perceptive commentary on these women, Wagner examines topics like the strange alchemy of the camera--how it can transform the attractive into the stunning, and vice-versa--and how the introduction of color brought a new erotic charge to movies--one that enabled these actresses to become aggressively sexual beings in a way that that black and white films had only hinted at.


      Robert Wagner is the star of such films as A Kiss Before Dying, The Longest Day, The Pink Panther, and most recently, the Austin Powers franchise. On television, he starred in It Takes a Thief (with Fred Astaire), Switch (with Eddie Albert and Sharon Gless), and Hart to Hart (with Stefanie Powers). He has recently appeared on Two and a Half Men and NCIS. He is married to actress Jill St. John.

      Scott Eyman is the author of eleven books about the movies, including Lion of Hollywood: The Life of Louis B. Mayer (which the Wall Street Journal called one of the five best books ever written about Hollywood), Empire of Dreams: The Epic Life of Cecil B. DeMille, and more recently, John Wayne: The Life and Legend.

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    • King of Jazz: Paul Whiteman's Technicolor Revue

    • King of Jazz: Paul Whiteman's Technicolor Revue tells the story of the making, release, and restoration of Universal's 1930 Technicolor extravaganza King of Jazz. Authors James Layton and David Pierce have uncovered original artwork, studio production files, behind-the-scenes photographs, personal papers, unpublished interviews, and a host of other previously unseen documentation. The book offers a richly illustrated narrative with broader context on the film's diverse musical and theatrical influences. The story concludes with an in-depth look at the challenges Universal overcame in restoring the film in 2016. Additionally, the book's appendix provides a comprehensive guide to all of the film's performers, music, alternate versions, and deleted scenes.

      King of Jazz was one of the most ambitious films ever to emerge from Hollywood. Just as movie musicals were being invented in 1929, Universal Pictures brought together Paul Whiteman, leader of the country's top dance orchestra; John Murray Anderson, director of spectacular Broadway revues; a top ensemble of dancers and singers; early Technicolor; and a near unlimited budget. The film's highlights include a dazzling interpretation of George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue," which Whiteman had introduced to the public in 1924; Walter Lantz's "A Fable in Jazz," the first cartoon in Technicolor; and Anderson's grand finale "The Melting Pot of Music," a visualization of popular music's many influences and styles. The film is not only a unique document of Anderson's theatrical vision and Whiteman's band at its peak, but also of several of America's leading performers of the late 1920s, including Bing Crosby in his first screen appearance, and the Russell Markert Dancers, who would soon become Radio City Music Hall's famous Rockettes.


      James Layton is Manager of the Museum of Modern Art's Celeste Bartos Film Preservation Center. Prior to this he worked at George Eastman House in Rochester, NY, where he curated two gallery exhibitions and the website Technicolor 100. Layton has also acted as Cataloguer and Workflow Coordinator at the East Anglian Film Archive in Norwich, UK, and is co-author of the Image Permanence Institute's informational poster Knowing and Protecting Motion Picture Film (2009).

      David Pierce is an independent film historian and archivist. He was formerly the Head of Preservation and Curator of the National Film and Television Archive at the British Film Institute. His articles have appeared in numerous journals, and his report on the survival of American silent feature films was published by the Library of Congress in 2013. He founded the Media History Digital Library, providing free online access to millions of pages of motion picture magazines and books.

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    • THE ESSENTIALS: 52 Must-See Movies and Why They Matter

    • By Jeremy Arnold
      Forward by Robert Osborne

      Since its inception on Turner Classic Movies in 2001, The Essentials has become the ultimate for movie lovers to expand their knowledge of must-see cinema and discover or revisit landmark films that have had a lasting impact on audiences everywhere.

      Based on the hit series, THE ESSENTIALS by Jeremy Arnold showcases 52 must-see movies from the silent era to modern times. Readers can enjoy one film per week, like on the show, for a year of great viewing, or indulge in a movie-watching binge-fest. Each film is profiled with entertaining discourse on why it's an Essential, and running commentary is provided by TCM's Robert Osborne and Essentials guest hosts past and present: Sally Field, Drew Barrymore, Alec Baldwin, Rose McGowan, Carrie Fisher, Molly Haskell, Peter Bogdanovich, Sydney Pollack, and Rob Reiner.

      Featuring full-color and black-and-white photography of the greatest stars in movie history throughout, THE ESSENTIALS is the ultimate curated guide to 52 films that define the meaning of the word "classic."


      Jeremy Arnold, a writer and film historian, is the author of Lawrence of Arabia: The 50th Anniversary, a coffee-table book companion to that film's Blu-ray release. In addition to his work for numerous film trade publications, he has written over five hundred programming articles for the Turner Classic Movies website and contributed audio commentaries and historical essays to the DVD and Blu-ray releases of classic films.

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  1. DVD Reviews

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    • Dick Dinman & William Wellman Jr. Salute BATTLEGROUND!

    • DICK DINMAN & WILLIAM WELLMAN JR. SALUTE "BATTLEGROUND!": BATTLEGROUND remains producer/host Dick Dinman's all-time favorite WW2 film and distinguished actor, writer and producer William Wellman Jr. rejoins Dick as both salute William Wellman's Oscar-winning once in a lifetime epic military drama which has just been beautifully remastered on Blu-ray by the Warner Archive.

      The award-winning DICK DINMAN'S DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR is the only show devoted to Golden Age Movie Classics as they become available on DVD and Blu-ray. Your producer/host Dick Dinman includes a generous selection of classic scenes, classic film music and one-on-one interviews with stars, producers, and directors. To hear these as well as other DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR shows please go to www.dvdclassicscorner.com or www.dvdclassicscorner.net.

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    • Dick Dinman & Eddie Muller are ON DANGEROUS GROUND!

    • DICK DINMAN & EDDIE MULLER ARE "ON DANGEROUS GROUND": The Warner Archive has just released an astonishing looking (and sounding!) Blu-ray rendition of Nicholas Ray's dark yet hypnotically beautiful film noir ON DANGEROUS GROUND which features a steely yet sensitive performance from noir icon Robert Ryan that easily ranks up there with his finest efforts ever and producer/host Dick Dinman and his guest "Czar of Noir" Eddie Muller dissect the various qualities which make this film so captivatingly unique (including the plaintively emotional score by Bernard Herrmann which was one of his two favorites).

      PLUS: SHORT TAKES: Kino's Kl Classics' THE HOUSE ON 92nd STREET, DAISY KENYON and Cohen Film Collection's SUDDEN FEAR.

      COMING ATTRACTIONS: The Warner Archives' BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK and Twilight Time's KISS OF DEATH.

      The award-winning DICK DINMAN'S DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR is the only show devoted to Golden Age Movie Classics as they become available on DVD and Blu-ray. Your producer/host Dick Dinman includes a generous selection of classic scenes, classic film music and one-on-one interviews with stars, producers, and directors. To hear these as well as other DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR shows please go to www.dvdclassicscorner.com or www.dvdclassicscorner.net.

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    • Dick Dinman & Eddie Muller Explore THE ASPHALT JUNGLE!

    • DICK DINMAN & EDDIE MULLER EXPLORE "THE ASPHALT JUNGLE": Producer/host Dick Dinman welcomes back the "Czar of Noir" himself Eddie Muller as both celebrate the Criterion Collection's pristine release on Blu-ray of John Huston's THE ASPHALT JUNGLE which remains conceivably the greatest "heist/noir" masterwork ever committed to celluloid. (It's early in the year but its difficult to conceive that any home video outfit in the ensuing year will be able to top the astonishing "special features" included on this sensational disc.)

      PLUS: Show opener "Dick's Picks" salutes the Criterion Collection's recent Blu-ray releases of Robert Altman's McCABE & MRS. MILLER, Marlon Brando's ONE EYED JACKS and Howard Hawks' HIS GIRL FRIDAY.

      COMING SOON: DICK DINMAN & EDDIE MULLER ARE "ON DANGEROUS GROUND"!

      The award-winning DICK DINMAN'S DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR is the only show devoted to Golden Age Movie Classics as they become available on DVD and Blu-ray. Your producer/host Dick Dinman includes a generous selection of classic scenes, classic film music and one-on-one interviews with stars, producers, and directors. To hear these as well as other DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR shows please go to www.dvdclassicscorner.com or www.dvdclassicscorner.net.

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    • Dick Dinman Salutes Air Hero Jimmy Stewart!

    • DICK DINMAN SALUTES WW2 AIR HERO JIMMY STEWART: The dual releases of Olive Films stunning Blu-ray incarnation of the James Stewart air power classic STRATEGIC AIR COMMAND as well as author Robert Matzen's awe inspiring book MISSION: JIMMY STEWART AND THE FIGHT FOR EUROPE, which for the first time ever reveals the truth about Stewart's dangerous bombing missions over Germany, give producer/host Dick Dinman ample motivation to salute the spectacular military career of screen icon Stewart and Dick is joined by returning guest Robert Matzen as they marvel at the courage, skill and fortitude of this certifiable American hero.

      The opening DICK'S PICKS segment salutes Olive Films and their latest Blu-ray releases of not only STRATEGIC AIR COMMAND but Orson Welles' MACBETH (two versions!), HOUDINI, THE PRIVATE AFFAIRS OF BEL AMI, VILLA RIDES. ONE OF OUR AIRCRAFT IS MISSING and two new 4k releases of THE QUIET MAN and JOHNNY GUITAR (first time in original widescreen format on home video!).

      The award-winning DICK DINMAN'S DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR is the only show devoted to Golden Age Movie Classics as they become available on DVD and Blu-ray. Your producer/host Dick Dinman includes a generous selection of classic scenes, classic film music and one-on-one interviews with stars, producers, and directors. To hear these as well as other DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR shows please go to www.dvdclassicscorner.com or www.dvdclassicscorner.net.

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  1. Press Release

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    • IT'S ALWAYS FAIR WEATHER at NYC's Film Forum Celebrating Betty Comden's Centennial, 5/3

    • Gene Kelly & Stanley Donen's It's Always Fair Weather, starring Kelly, with music by AndrĂ© Previn and screenplay and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, will have a special screening at 8:15 pm at Film Forum on May 3, the 100th anniversary of Betty Comden's birth. The screening will be introduced by Green's daughter, actress, singer, and Tony-nominated lyricist/songwriter Amanda Green.

      Born Basya Cohen to Russian immigrants in Brooklyn on May 3, 1917, Betty Comden first attracted attention as part of the Revuers, a theater troupe comprised of herself, Judy Holliday, Leonard Bernstein, and Adolph Green, which performed to acclaim at the Village Vanguard in Greenwich Village. Her first Broadway show was 1944's On the Town with Green, Bernstein, and choreographer Jerome Robbins - besides writing the book and lyrics (including the iconic "New York, New York"), she and Green also co-starred in supporting roles.

      In the late 1940s, Comden and Green went Hollywood, where they wrote screenplays for classic films like Singin' in the Rain and The Band Wagon. Even after the move to Hollywood, the team continued to write lyrics for Broadway, teaming with many of American musical theater's most important composers, including Bernstein (Wonderful Town), Jule Styne (Bells Are Ringing, Subways Are Sleeping, Fade Out - Fade In, Hallelujah, Baby!), and Cy Coleman (On the Twentieth Century, The Will Rogers Follies). Her final public appearance was at Film Forum.

      35mm. Approx. 102 Min.

      For more information, links and showtimes, visit www.filmforum.org

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The Egg and I DVD
$8.55
was $14.98
Westward The Women DVD
$14.96
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The Graduate (Criterion Collection) DVD
$23.35
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  • Wednesday, March 20, 2011

  • Removed: 10:00pm Springfield Rifle
    12:00pm Casablanca
    Added: 1:00pm Virginia City
    12:15pm Casablanca
  •  
  • Wednesday, March 20, 2011

  • Removed: 10:00pm Springfield Rifle
    12:00pm Casablanca
    Added: 1:00pm Virginia City
    12:15pm Casablanca
  •  
  • Wednesday, March 20, 2011

  • Removed: 10:00pm Springfield Rifle
    12:00pm Casablanca
    Added: 1:00pm Virginia City
    12:15pm Casablanca